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The Port Gibson reveille. [volume] (Port Gibson, Miss.) 1890-current, May 25, 1916, Image 5

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86090233/1916-05-25/ed-1/seq-5/

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CONNIE MACK'S FAMED $100,000 INFIELD
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Famous Quartet of Players Now Broken Up.
Somebody tagged the name "$100,000 infield" on the Mclnnis-Colllns
Barry-Baker combination in the pennant-winning days of Connie Mack's
Athletics, and it stuck until the infield was broken up. There was always
the idea, however, that the title was not to be Interpreted literally, despite
the recognized worth of the combination. The sale of Frank Baker to the
Yankees has proved that the famous infield was not overrated, financially;
in fact, it was underrated. •
Mack got $50,000 when he transferred Eddie Collins to the White Sox.
Later he got $8,000 for Jack Barry from Joe Lannin of Boston. Two members
of the quartet remained, and there was some doubt as to whether Mack
. would, or could, get $42,000 for the pair. The price for Baker has never been
officially announced, but it is generally understood that the home-run king
cost Ruppert and Houston $35,000. This leaves only $7,000 to be accounted
for by Stuffy Mclnnis. Stuffy, who is still a youngster, has batted over .300
for six successive years in the majors, and he would bring two or three times
that $7,000. So that famous infield was more than a $100,000 proposition
after all.
MOBBED FOR WINNING GAME
Mordecai Brown, Famous Cub Pitcher,
Tells of Contest Which Stands
Out Above All Others.
In a fanning bee Mordecai Brown
was asked to tell the best game that
he ever pitched.
"There is one game which stands
out in my mind above all others. That
was in 1908, when we beat the New
York Giants in the play-off for the Na
tional league pennant. You will re
member that Pfeister started that
game and filled the bases in the first
Inning. Chance motioned to me to go
in, and I got out of the hole with but
one run scored against us.
"In the third inning we made four
runs off Mathewson. In the seventh
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Mordecai Brown.
inning the Giants started a rally and
made one run. The game ended with
the score, 4 to 2.
"The strain of that game was never
equaled by me. Upon it hinged a
league championship and the right and
honor of play in the world's series. In
addition to this, the feeling in New
York was at such an extreme pitch
that we had received 'Black Hand' let
ters, which threatened us with our
several lives if we took the pennant
from New York.
"I don't believe I ever was so
alarmed on a diamond as at the con
clusion of that game, when the crowd
at the Polo grounds practically mob
bed us. Chance was hit in the neck
and could not speak for several days.
Other players were similarly treated.
Luckily I escaped."
YANKS' OUTFIELD IS SPEEDY
Magee, Maisel and Gilhoofey Can Also
Throw and Are Dangerous at Bat—
Combine Offense and Defense.
.. With Magee, Maisel and Gilhooley
(and there is no longer any question
about these three being the selec
tions) Donovan has a trio of outfield
ers who have speed, can throw and in
addition are dangerous at bat and on
the bases. They combine more defen
sive and offensive strength than any
outfield combination the New Yorks
have had in years.
EX-FED PLAYS GAME ALONE
Player Under Contract to Newark
CfUb Reports for Duty Every
Morning and Afternoon.
Rupert Mills, a kid playbr with the
Newark Feds last year, is under con
tract with former owner Pat Powers,
who is unable t» get the boy a berth.
So in order to earn his salary of $3,000
Mills Reports each morning for prac
tice and works with some neighbor
hood plavnî».
DIAMOND
NOTES
Hans Wagner seems to be the same
old demon of the past.
* * *
The Athletics continue to prove
easy for their opponents.
* ♦ •
One solid wallop delivered in the
pinch covers a multitude of errors.
* • •
Joe Jackson is hitting the ball hard
these days, but he is not getting many
hits.
<!
The town that produces a famous
basebàll pitcher can well afford to rest
on its laurels.
• /■
* • *
Adams of the Phils sets aside two
hours each day perfecting his famous
express-speed ball.
• * *
Here's news! Connie Mack says
that his team will not be a pennant
contender this year.
* • •
Is Hans .Wagner aged?' Watch his
batting every day. He has been get
ting bingles regularly.
* *' * * *
Hal Chase appears to have his old
time punch back again. He is play
ing great ball for the Reds.
0*0
Joe Wood, the once great pitcher
of the Sox, is asking for a job from
any club in the big leagues.
• * *
The Cleveland Indians, with Tris
Speaker acting as field captain, are
much improved over last year.
* * *
"Fried eggs càuse insanity,
an expert. Ah! Now we know what
ails the baseball fans of Sir. Louis.
* * *
If the managers' predictions come
true this season, the two major league
pennant races will furnish an eight
piece tie.

says
* * *
As a special concession Benny
Kauff permits the other members of
the Giants to live in the same hotel
with him. *
• • *
Joe Judge, Washington first-sacker,.
originally toiled in an electric power
house. Now we know why he sparkles
in fast company. •
• • *
This is the time of the year when
great baseball teams throw
games that they bitterly regret in the
shank of the season.
* * *
Joe Gedeon, the new second base
man of the Yankees, is playing a good
game and is making the New York
team look like champions.
• • *
Heilman, who is playing first for
the Tigers, has shown so much clàss
that he will soon be rated as the best
first baseman in the league.
• • •
away
The Oäkland club has released Babe
Danzig and Frank Hosp, who failed to
show signs of coming back, and re
turned Catcher Dave Griffith to Wich
ita.
0 0 *
Another Titus breaks into the game
this year. His front name is Elmer
and he hails from Philadelphia. He
will play with Wheeling in the Central
league.
\
• * *
George O'Brien, catcher sold by the
St. Louis Browns to the Terre Haute
Central league club, is out with an an
nouncement that he will retire from
baseball.
„ m * * *
Manager Tinker has always con
tended that Max Flack is a wonderful
little outfielder and he is bearing out
the manager's comment by starring in j
the outfield. I
m
LINGO OF AUSTRALIA
Description of a Baseball Game
Is Quite Unique.
Pitcher "Mounts the Box" and "Treats
Batter With Respect"—"Came
With Brilliant Hit Right
Out to Left Field."
The following description of a base
ball game played recently in Australia
between native and American resident
nines gives an excellent idea of an
tipodean baseball vernacular:
The American mounted the box first,
sending Marre to face the attack. The
pitcher treated him with respect, al
lowing him to walk to first. Casey
followed, and Hearnden's error ena
bled him to reach second In safety.
Caswell then threw wildly at first bag,
and before the ball was recovered
Marre and Gasey had sprinted across
the plate. Tucker, meanwhile, had
made good on the diamond, but Bragg's
fly, which was muffed, gave the fields
man an opportunity of cutting the run
ner off at third. Bragg consequently
scored on Brown's hit to the country,
making three runs for the inning.
Australia sent Hearndon to the box
first, but a putout at first base was
registered.
Marre's bad throw saw him safely
landed at first Golby then came with
a brilliant hit right out to left field,
bringing Comber home. Spiller, who
had been missed by the catcher, made
his way to third and a passed ball
completed the distance for him. In
the next term America could not get
off the box, and then Australia made a
determined effort to draw level in the
succeeding term. Hearndon brilliant
ly smashed to the left "garden" for
,a Iwo-bagger, and a passed ball sent
hLx on to third. Another passed ball
completed the Journey for him, and
the score read three-all.
"Spiller was indulging in daring
pilfering on the diamond, and a well
Judged steal gave him second base,
from where he was sent flying across
the plate on Golby's clout, which
Casey allowed to get past. Golby had
reached third when Lambert went
into bat, and the Leichhardt player
brought him home on a fine outfield
hit, which produced two bags. Cas
well then brought Lambert home, mak
ing four runs for the session."
• i

Comber followed and
it
TIPPLE SENT TO BALTIMORE
Manager Bill Donovan Wins Out. In
Argument With Captain Huston
Over Recruit Pitcher.
It seems that Manager Bill Donovan
of the Yankees has found a real club
magnate in Capt. Til Huston. They
disputed over the fate of Pitcher Dan
Tipple, for whom the New York club
had paid $9,000 or so. Donovan decid
ed Tipple would not do and ordered
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him to the Baltimore Internationals,
all other major league managers agree
ing that he didn't look good, but Hus
ton, remembering the price paid for
the pitcher,, insisted he should be giv
en more trial. Donovan won in the
end, because Tipple failed to make
good.
LAJOIE RETAINS' OLD SKILL
Big Frenchman Has Been In Major
Leagues Twenty Years—Is Most
Graceful Infielder.
"Larry" Lajoie, who will be forty
two years of age next September,
played a brilliant fielding game. This
is his twenty-first year as p, profes
sional ball player and his twentieth
in the major leagues. He always has
been one of the most graceful infield
ers in the profession and still possesses
much of his old skill.
\
SUITS
TEAMS DISCARD OLD
Boston Braves and Chicago Cube Ar
ray Themselves in Gray Uniform^
While Traveling.
The somber blue or black or what
ever it was that the Boston Braves
wore on the road has been discarded
and they are rigged out in a light gray
for this season. The Cubs also have
discarded their blue uniforms and gray
in one shade or another is the popular
brand for traveling suits.
Passing of a Highbrow.
Eddie Grant's retirement from base
ball to take up the practice of law
marks the passing of one of the real
highbrows of the game. Grant, a grad
uate of Harvard, probably is one of the
most thoroughly educated men who
ever played professional ball.
j Will be used by teams of a semipro
I league this season
Use for Old Cub Park.
The West side park in Chicago, for
so many years the home of the Cubs,
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Congressmen Want Portraits in the Directory.
W ASHINGTON.—The Congressional Record recently contained a petition
signed by 65 members of the house recommending that In all future issues
of the Congressional directory the photographs of the 435 members of the
house accompany their autobiogra
phies In that annual publication.
Furthermore, the house voted In
formally to Include In the Bgrohart
printing bill an amendment authoris
ing publication of photographs in the
directory.
An amusing debate, participated
in by handsome and not so handsome
members of the bouse, preceded the
adoption of the amendment. Con
gressmen Edward of Georgia and
Smith of Idaho sponsored the amend
ment. Among the reasons advanced why the pictures of members ought to
be published in the directory the following were enumerated in the petition:
Members would be more quickly acquainted with each other; officials In
the departments would easily recognize members and make introductions less
necessary; the directory would be more valuable as a public document; the
expense would be nominal, only a few hundred dollars each session.
When Congressman Ragsdale suggested moving pictures of members, and
Congressman Walsh recommended a plush-covered album for the clerk's desk,
Congressman Smith insisted that this was a serious matter, and he did not
Intend to reply to Jocular inquiries. Mr. Walsh said that "it might be wise to
have the fingerprints to aid In the identification of members.
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Public Health Service Monkey Causes Trouble
B ECAUSE an innocent, but bewhiskered, monkey belonging to the publio
health service was locked in a room while a citizen of Washington was
looking up the animal's antecedents, the United States may be sued for dam
age. The room was the property of
a man living near the hygienic labora
tory, and although the monkey was
the occupant thereof for only.an hour,
what he did to the apartment was
aplenty. He made gay with a pair
of trousers, smashed a large banquet
lanfp and toi^ off 12 square yards of
wall paper.
The trouble started when the
monkey left the laboratory without
pdJurission. For several weeks be
had been confined in a cage in the
building and, in company with a horse, many guinea pigs and several chickens,
had submitted to a number of experiments at the hands of surgeons. One of
the uses to which he was put was the testing of serums, but he did not like
the hypodermic. Watching his chance, one day he left the cage when one of
the helpers forgot to lock the door, and within a few minutes was skipping
over the roofs.
ö;
The first thing the surgeons knew about the monkey's escape was a call
from a nearby retail merchant, who inquired whether a reward had been
I will give you your monkey for $2," he said,
offered for the animal's return.
"and that is cheap, too, for I had a terrible time catching him.
"But we have no fund for that purpose," replied the doctor in charge of
the laboratory. "I think myself it is worth $2 to catch a live monkey. I
wouldn't do it for $10." The man wanted to get rid of the monkey, so he led
one of the attendants to his house.
When the door was opened to the room where the monkey was confined
it was found to be a wreck,
caught the runaway.
Perhaps you had better keep the monkey for the damage he has done,
suggested the man from the laboratory.
Not on your life," cried the owner of the trousers,
house tw<^ hours longer there will be nothing left Take Mm away, and I will
sue the United States for what I have lost
•«
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Oh, my new trousers," cried the man who
Just look at them; they cost me $9 last week.
U
« •
If he stays in my
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Mystery of tire Missing Reindeer Is Unsolved
H0 ate the reindeer?" is the question that is agitating the department of
ff the Interior. It is a deep, dark mystery. Herbert Meyer, private sec
retary to the secretary of the interior, affects to believe that the matter is one of
no moment But when he is pressed
\ into discussion of the subject his face
[ IG0NÊ ^ wears the expression seen upon the
^ * face of the cat after its justly cele
brated interview with the canary. But
he is the one member of the secre
tary's immediate official family who
has produced an alibi for himself.
Private secretaries, in the very nature
of their work, are experts in alibis.
The story of the missing reindeer
starts with the beginning of the win
||| ter's social activities in Washington.
For the first time in several years official Washington determined to
the old practice of having cabinet dinners. That is, each cabinet officer in turn
was- to give a dinner to the president and Mrs. Wilson.
Bright young men about the department concluded that here
chance to pull a clever stunt and incidentally advertise the resources of
Alaska. Stephen T. Mather, a young millionaire who puts in some 14 hours a
day at work as assistant to the secretary, put the idea Into effect. He got
William T. Loop, who is in charge of the Alaska school and reindeer service,
to import a shipment of reindeer meat from Alaska via Seattle, and it was put
in cold storage awaiting Secretary Lane's cabinet dinner.
The secretary was called West unexpectedly, and it was necessary to
postpone the feast. Therefore the cold-storage warehouse had the custody of
the precious meat for some time.
When the dinner date approached someone thought to check up on the
meat A delegation visited the butcher shop where it had been stored. Mother
Hubbard's sensations on discovering the bareness of her cupboard had nothing
on the sensations of the delegation. The meat so the butcher said, had been
withdrawn by order of the secretary. The secretary, when this was reported
to him, was mystified, but since several have authority to do things in his
name he concluded to remain mystified. Inquiries might prove embarrassing.
So it was that President Wilson had something else to eat when he tucked
his legs under Secretary Lane's table. Alaska reindeer did not appear on
the menu.
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Even the President Couldn't Resist This Show
T HE boy in a man remains even if the man becomes president of the United
States. This was demonstrated the day President Wilson went to congress
to advise the lawmakers that he had sent the ultimate note on the submarine
issue to Germany. Plainly cognizant
of the seriousness of the step he had
taken the president left the White
House in his automobile for the mile
drive up Pennsylvania avenue to the
capitol. Passing one of the local
newspaper offices was a crowd of
thousands stretched completely across
the wide thoroughfare, stopping the
presidental party, bent upon an er
rand of the greatest concern to the
entire nation. The great crush puz
zled the president and the secret
service men until they followed the upward gaze of the sea of faces and saw
suspended in midair a man struggling to release himself from a straight jacket.
It was a^well-known. juggler performing one of his outdoor advertising
»feats. "Ttie police fbrced a passageway for the White House car, which
moved ahead Jlowly, the president all the while peering through the windows,
first the side.lthen the rear, apparently as much absorbed in the man's antics
as any newsboy. He seemed disappointed when the way was eleared for the
continuance cé his journey before the vaudevillian had extricated himself.
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COLOR-BLIND BEES.
According to the London correspondent of the New York Sun, Prof. K.
von Frisch ofl
to test the,colq
ever color sea^
not comprised
the open air ne
ence method, heVotmd that one day's training was enough to teach many
hundreds of bees $o distinguish between blue and gray.
To test the beé\s perception of color, he offered them a material induce
ment to remember'.(and distinguish) that whatever was colored blue was
sweet, and whateveif was gray (although he employed 32 shades) was not
sweet. In the same fway they were taught later that yellow indicated sweet
ness. But no amount of training was ever able to teach the bees that there
was any difference in «jolor between red and black. The bees were totally
Hfolor blind to red.
Berlin baa been making a series of interesting experiments
p sense of bees. These experiments seem to show that, what
|p bees may possess, the ability to distinguish red as red is
In it. The professor carried on his experiments on bees in
ar his hives, and by the aid of what is called the food-prefer
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In Woman 's Realm
Extremely Pretty Dress for Summer May Be Made of Plain and
Dotted Organdie, Though Other Materials May Be Chosen
Selection of the Veil Is Most Important—Innumerable
Patterns From Which to Choose.
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A very pretty and summery dress of
plain and dotted organdie achieves fine
style by combining these familiar ma
terials. Organdie in cottons, as taf
feta in silks, has proved peculiarly well
adapted to the styles of today. The
originality of the model lies in combin
ing the plain and dotted surfaces so
that they play parts of equal impor
tance, and it suggests the use of other
goods in the same way.
In the model shown the body and
skirt are of the plain organdie. Five

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8UMMER DRESS.
graduated ruffles of the dotted organ
die encircle it, the first and widest
about the hem and the narrow fifth
ruffle at the waist line. The under
skirt is gored and gathered to flare.
Its crispness and that of the ruffles is
almost equivalent to the effect of crin
oline.
The three-quarter length sleeves
and square cape of the dotted organdie
are edged with narrow ruffles made of
1L The throat opens with a shallow V.
A belt of ribbon in any color desired
may be worfi with this dress. White
moire, corded near the edges, makes
that shown in the picture. Silk stock
ings and white buckskin or canvas slip
pers will finish the pretty toilette suit
ably.
Among the new summer goods there
are plain voiles and lawns in beautiful
are plain voiles and lawns in beautiful
veil has no following.
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MOST POPULAR VEIL.
colors with which dainty interpreta
tions of Scotch plaids may be found in
light tints and varied colors. Some
thing very distinctive and original
might be made by combining these in
the manner shown in this organdie
dress. Then there are the crossbar
and striped organdies, which might be
used instead of the more familiar dot
ted varieties. They are sheerer than
chiffon, the daintiest of >all cotton,
weaves, and retain the crispness which
distinguishes the plain material. Noth
ing could be better for a graduating
gown.
A circular veil with hexagonal mesh
and border of small chenille balls is
one of many that have aided designers
in the conception of new effects in
Scintillant Coiffures.
The fashion for peacock hair orna
ments is said to be directly traceable
to Bakst. All kinds of fancy combs
are studded with sparkling blue and
green stones. The wide-open fan ar
rangements are supposed to top off
the Spanish coiffure, after the style
adopted in the "Goyescas"—the new
Spanish opera. Barettes of studded
tortoise are also seen; some of them
are oblong, others heart-shaped, and
several were fashioned after a shield
design.
millinery. Those to be worn over the
face are of unbroken mesh with aUl
sorts of fancy borders, and are woven!
of fine hairlike threads, so that they,
win not interfere with the vision. Oth
ers, to be thrown back, are purely
an adjunct of the hat and show sur
faces broken by big polka dots of flat
sequins, or lace patterns in convent
tional and floral designs.
These small veil-trimmed hats ar«
very chic, but this management of the
veil is quite outside the real realm of

is
its usefulness. Veils are worn fof
two reasons, to keep the hair neatly
in place and because they are becom
ing. There are so many patterns ta
choose from that a selection is a mat
ter of trying them on as in choosing a
hat or a color for a gown. One may
buy a mesh in almost any shape, as
square, round, diamond shape or hex
agonal. Borders vary ate» aa/Llhsrg
%re several colors to choose from,
Taupe, brown, gray and purple tonesi
with several shades of dark blue;
make it worth while to experimenti
as they are adapted to varied come
plexions. Black remains most popular^
but is not always the happiest choice,
The threads of which veils, and es«
pecially black veils, of today are wov
en are incredibly fine, and the heav*
veil has no following.
Veilings and separate veils are made
in narrow widths with narrow borders.
The border reaches to the chin so that
the veil covers just the face,
centric methods at draping have
peared so far in the'season's history,
unless we clase the harem veil, which,
has been introduced for the motor
ist, under that head. Many of the
new motor veils are of very thin chif
fon and some of them are circular,
suspended from an elastic cord that
holds them in place about the hat In
the manner shown for the face veil
pictured here.
No eo
ap
Embroidery Hint.
It Is intefesting to copy the designs
of good china in embroidery, whether
in silk or wools, upon any suitabl®
ground. One woman has just embroid
ered the familiar blue Copenhagen
china design on white for a table cen
terpiece to go with her own Delft
china. The many colored little bunches
of flowers that are hand painted
Worcester and other old English chi
nas are just as fascinating when you
see them worked on quilts, cushions
and the like.
on

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