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The Port Gibson reveille. [volume] (Port Gibson, Miss.) 1890-current, July 20, 1916, Image 2

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THE REVEILLE
tklkphonk NO. 19
THURSDAY, JULY 2o. iyi6
H. H. CRISLER.
UBSCRIPTION PRICE S2 PER YEAR
Entered at the Postofflce at Port Gibson,Mu*
as second-class mail matter
The Reveille is authorized to announce
R. N. MILLER
as a candidata for Representative in Con
gress from the Seventh District, subject to
the Democratic Primary.
The Reveille is authorized to announce
PERCY E. QUIN
as a candidate for re-election as Repre
sentative in Congress from the Seventh
District, subject to the Democratic Prima
ry
The Reveille is authorized to announce
J. B. HOLDEN
the present incumbent, as a candidate for
justice of the Supreme Court from the
Second or Southern District, subject to the
Democratic Primary.
JUDGE ANDERSON COMMENDED.
S[ 4B al Judge R. B. Anderson
rebuked the jury in the Dr. Cook
case at Vicksburg last week for
His rebuke,
failure to convict,
while sterp, was dignified and
devoid ot bitterness.
We know nothing of the legal
side ot such procedure,—whether
it is proper for a presiding judge
to take such a course,—but it is
frequently done. Nor is this paper
familiar with the case,
dirty, and no decent man who was
not directly interested in it cared
to wade through such filth.
Judge Anderson was presiding as
an absolutely disinterested person
—probably the only person con
nected with the case, save tbe ju
It was
But
ry, who was not influenced one way
He is a criminal
Un
or tbe other.
lawyer of years of practice,
doubtedly be firmly believed wbat
I
be said, and spoke because be felt
tbe call of duty. Few men iudeed
care to go out of tbe beateu path
of acquiescence to criticise bis fel
lows face to face unless strongly
impressed by a feeling ot patriot
ism.
From tbe standpoint of a higher
mural standard, we heartily
c mtnend Judge Anderson tor
bis effort to give the state juries
wiih keener consciences. Every
maa who has done jury duty real
izes the crying need o4 this. The
crime of which Dr. Cook was
charged is growing too common,
There are other cases of the kind
now peDdmg in tbe state, and tbe
juries which are to try them may
more carefully weigh the evidence
because of this judge's criticism.
Commenting upon tbe occur
rence, the Jacksou Clarion-Ledger
thus commends judge Aodersou:
No Judge has a right to impugn
the motives of a jury in arriving at
a verdict, but he does have tbe
right to speak bis own mind aud
express his own opinions, and
that is just wbat Judge Anderson
did a few days ago when a-Warren
comity jury returned a verdict not
guilty in the case of Dr. E. R.
Cook, charged with manslaughter
in connection with tbe death of a
I
young womao upoa whom it was
alleged be bad performed a crim
inal operatiou.
Judge Auderson did no more
than wbat a just aud upright judge
should bave doue. According to
bis opiuioo, aud it seems to have
been shared by nearly every one
who has kept up with tbe bistory
of fbe case, guilt bad been coo
elusively proveo, or- as Judge An
derson put it, "Tbe State bad
made out a perfect case" agaiost
the defendant, and under tbe cir
cunstaoces be was justified io de
claring that an irreparable injus
tice had been doue Warreq couo
ly and tbe city of Vicksburg, by
the most "scandalous aud ridicul
verdict be bad ever seen
to
in
ing
its
do.
ous
turued into court iu an experience
of nearly a score of years.
Tbe crime ot which Dr. Çook
was charged is one that is becom
ing altogether too common. Men
who are a disgrace to their pro
fession resort to practices abhor
red by honorable men purely tor
tbe purpose of pecuniary gain,
willing to take the risk of covering
up their tracks tor a few paltry
dollars wrung from destitute and
deserved women in the effort to
hide tbeir «shame.
If more lodges when they see a
palpable miscarriage of justice bad
the courage to speak tbeir mind
and tell a jury what they thought
of its action there would be fewer
verdicts of acquittal upou techni
cal excuses where evidence bad
been produced to prove beyond
every reasonable doubt that a
crime bad been committed and
that the accused was the guilty
party.
Judge Anderson is to be com
mended tor the performance of a
patriotic duly. It-takes courage
and a sense of devotion to justice
and State to tell a jury that while
he bad no power to set aside its
verdict, he believed it a miscar
riage of justice; a misconception
of duty, and au injury to city,
county, State and country that
would make of Yicksburg the
mecca of all woman who bad gone
astray in search of a physician
who had no regard for the ethics
of his profession or the instincts of
humanity, and be should receive
the thanks of all law-abiding Mis
sissippians.
There are too many cases of the
same sort occurring in this State,
and the sooner some one is bung
for it the quicker it will be broken
to
for
the
the
for
up.
The Reveille commends Justice
Hedrick for preferring charges
against the three men who know
ing, wilfully aud openly violated
the state and town law by working
on the Joseph drug store last Sun
day. That was one of the most
brazen defiance of law which has
come to the notice of the writer.
Tbe violation of the Sunday
law, as well as others, has grown
common, and it is time to call a
halt. Unless our laws are upheld
all authority is held in contempt.
We have great respect for the man
who values, bis oatb of office and
dares do what be knows to be bis
duty.
Under the^present law, any of
ficer who fails to prosecute an of
tense is liable to impeachment.
is
as
of
Senator Vardamaa has changed
his mind on tbe ship-purchase bill.
He is now supporting it.
Paying lits Ceditors.
The Bank of Hermanville, under
tbe care of Special Ageût G. W.
Dudley, acting for tbe State Bank
Examiners, has paid tbe depositors
and creditors of tbe institution
ninety per cent of wbat was due
them.
In remitting the third install
ment to tbe creditors, Mr. Dudley
says :
Siuce takiug over this bank we
were*very desirous of paying to
the depositors "dollar for dollar"
and have been working bard to
that end.
"This check makes a total of
90 per cent now paid. We are
confident that we shall be able to
pay the remaining io per ceot.
Tbe Banking Department bas
given you its best efforts in.tbe
liquidation of the Bank of Her
manville; and we hope that tbe
results are satisfactory to you.
1 <
<<
» 9
Developing the Negro.
I Rev. W. H. Braxton, colored,
who is a native of Port Gibson,
but for many years has been work
ing among his race in other parts
of the state, was here this week
arousing interest in a plan which
he has formulated for general
development work among negroes.
His plan is to establish a large
industrial plant in the delta where
this work may be prosecuted.
Two or three white delta planters
have promised to donate 1000 acres
of land, and $1600 has already
been subscribed. He carried his
plan before the last session of the
legislature and it was reported
favorably by the committee, but
failed to reach a vote before ad
journment.
er
of
to
ditlon
4 «
$100 Reward, $100
The readers of this paper will be pleased
to learn that there is at least one dreaded
disease that science has been able to cure
in all its stages, and that is catarrh. Ca
tarrh being greatly influenced by constitu
tional conditions requires constitutional
treatment. Hall's Catarrh Cure is taken
internally and acts thru the blood on the
mucous surfaces of the system thereby des
troying the foundation of the disease, giv
ing the patient strength by building up the
constitution and assisting nature in doing
its work. The proprietors have so much
faith in the curative powers of Hall's Ca
tarrh Cure that they offer One Hundred
Dollars for any case that it fails to cure.
Send fori ist of testimonials. •
Address F. J. CHENEY & CO., Tole
do. übte, u Sold by all druggists, ygc.
COUNTY ASSESS
to
a
bad
bad
a
and
a
its
that
the
of
Mis
the
Decrease of $85,279 as Compared With l915. Big Increase in
Number of Automobiles, but Decrease in Values.
The following table gives the comparative assessments of perronal
property for the years 1915 and 1916. When yon consider amount of
capital on hand and on deposit; the value of household furniture, and
number of pistols, you wonder if there was not a terrible amount of
stifling of conscience about the first of February :
/-1916-\ , -
No. Valud* No.
. 653
.1769
....... 1789
.8732 I2r,2i4 8732
- 117 4,090 160
2do6 128,489 2219
.1276 80,913 1360
.... 976 2,300 687
— 866 2,486 839
. 43 10,485
...-1238 -23,777 1294
. 213 15,080 237
. 213 4,146 237
. 2,890
1.105
I9I.S-'
Value
Poll tax, white..
Poll tax. colored ..
Commutation road tax.
Cattle, over 2 cows and calves
Oxen.
« •
Horses .-.—.
Mules ..
Sheep and goats, oeer 20..
Hogs, over 10.-.
Automobiles .
'Carriages, bicycles, etc..
Pianos, organs, etc.
Watches..
Jewelry.....
Gold and silver plate-.
Guns, more than one-.
Pistols, etc.
Adding machines.-.
Cash registers-..-.
Typewriters-..
Boats-.-.-.
Capital employed In merchandise
Capital employed in manufacturing—
Cash on hand..
Money on deposit.
Money loaned at over 6 per cent-.
Collectible indebtedness.
Furniture, over $250 In value..
Bonds, etc.-.
Capital stock, etc., in banks .
Other personal property.
Total valuation.
Horse colts exempt...
Mule colts .
Ass colts. .
Exempt sheep..
Exemp- goats'.
Exempt hogs.
Exempt cattle.
7 2 3
1702
1775
12 r, 170
4.425
117,409
86.775
830
2,910
9.050
23 878
16,285
4.034
2,785
1.590
28
366
21
230
34
89
627
85
530
825
5
910
4
510
17
H
500
1,160
43
44
1.045
8
780
2
200
123,865
8,400
103,510
5 0 . 2 30
2.437
7.750
32,930
2,550
6,210
686
8,768
12,435
3,650
5,220
5,000
78.582
2,725
649,132
has
a
200
128,685
4.550
734,411
344
422
75
52
2
i
.. 482
.- 481
572
884
2918
4028
3693
...—3001
a
Renowned Man
Visits Atlanta
L. T. Cooper, Noted Scientist and
Philanthropist Gives Large Part
of Income Each Year to
Charity.
Not in recent years, perhaps,
has the coming ot any public char
acter aroused such widespread In
terest as did the visit of L* T.
Cooper, tbe milllionaire philan
thropist, to Atlanta.
Mr. Cooper is described as one
of America's foremost leaders of
advanced thought, and sprang into
fame aud fortune through his new
health theories based on wbat is
known as the Tanlac treatment.
He never ceases to surprise you
with the infinite variety of his
knowledge, and its absolute cor
rectness and thoroughness. In
several of the larger cities, espec
ially throughout the South, he has
done a great deal of relief work
among the poor.
Mr. Coopei is a firm believer in
practical philanthropy, and his re
lief work in Atlanta is already
famiüar to the charity workers of
that city. During his recent visit
there he distributed at the Pied
mont Hotel, under the personal
direction of leading charity work
eleven hundred ready made
ers,
dresses of excellent quality to the
poor women and children. Ladies
prominent in Atlauta social life atid
many prominent citizens were on
hand early in the afternoon to as
sist in co-operating with Mr. Coop
er in this worthy cause.
A few weeks previous to this he
performed a similar service in
Birmingham and donated one thou
sand dresses to the poor of that
city. Similar donations were also
made in Jackson, Vicksburg, Mem
phis, Savannah, Montgomery,
Macon, Augusta, Nashville, Chat
tanooga and Knoxville. And his
establishment of the now famous
free bread line" iu Louisville,
where be distributed fifty thousand
loaves of bread absolutely free and
without question to those in want,
proved a revelation to charity
workers there. In fact, in practi
cally every city Mr. Cooper has
visited he has always shown his
great sympathy for the poor and
unfortunate by performing some
unique act of charity.
Mr. Cooper contends that nine
tenths of the diseases and ill health
of the present-day American is due
to faulty digestlou and improper .
. , . , , , ,
assimilation or the food, which
finally produces a stuffed up con
ditlon of the vital organs.
Tt has heen said that Tanlac hit
.. , ' est
celebrated medicine which is-now
accomplishing such remarkable
results throughout the country, lis
4 «
I
not only quickly overcomes' all
catarrhal inflamations of the mu
cous membrane, but acts directly
in the correction of stomach, liver,
kidney and intestinal disorders.
Tanlac has been so convincingly
proven by the thousands upon
thousands who have endorsed it,
it is also a reconstructive Tonic of
great power, and has been known
to entirely ref
nate cases of rlÄJiatism and blood
disorders, in a v 3 ry short time.
It is, indeed, doubtful if any
thing ever placed on the market In
the way of medicine has sprung
into such popular favor in so short
a time. People everywhere have
been quick to recognize its wonder
ful merit. The demand for it has
been nothing short of phenomenal.
In Atlanta, where Tanlac was
placed on sale seven months ago
over 40,000 bottles have been sold,
which, according to the Jacob's
Pharmacy Co., of that city, has
established a new record and is
unprecedented in the history of the
drug business in Atlanta. In the
city of Knoxville the Knhlman
Chambliss Co. sold and distributed
45,326 bottles in nine months. In
Louisville, Ky., the Taylor-Isaacs
Drug Co., who operate eight retail
stores in that city, sold 32.000 bot
tles in less than 30 days. Through
tbe Nashville office alone nearly
100,000 bottles were sold in six
months' time. The demand for
Tanlac in Birmingham, Chatta
nooga, and, in fact, everywhere it
has been introduced has likewise
been phenomenal, and tbe demand
for it is constantly increasing. A
total of over one million bottles
of the medicine have been sold in
nine months' time, and it is, with
out a donbt, 4 be most widely talk
ed ot medicine in the world today.
When asked to explain this
record breaking demand for Tanlac,
Mr. G. F. Willis,
Sonthern representative, said;
There can be only one possible
explantation and it be can told in
one word—'merit.' That tells the
whole story. No preparation, no
matter how extensively advertised,
can possibly meet with such phe
nomenai success,unless it possesses
extraordinary^ curative powers.
Thousands upon thousands are
testifying daily that they have
been relieved of disease after years
of suffering by its use.
Tanlac is sold in Port Gibson
exclusively by J. G. Joseph.
[ADV.]
and
In
T.
one
of
into
new
is
you
his
cor
In
has
te most obsti
in
re
of
the
on
as
he
in
Will My Child Take Dr King's New
. Disoovery ?
The best answer is Dr. King s New Dis
cove ry itself. It's a pleasant sweet syrup,
eas y to take. It contains the medicines
which years of experience have proven
best f or coughs and colds. Those who
have used Dr. King's New Discovery long
est are ns best friends. Besides every
bottle is guaranteed. If you don't get
"uyabçïüe/uïè afdire^ed m< Keep what J
lis left for cough and cold insurance. [Adv.J , E,
Mr. Cooper's
» «
9 9
j
4
jk
mm
V
V.
1.

>1
P. A. pats new joy
into the sport of
smoking !
Y OU may live to
be 110 and never
feel old enough to
vote, but it's cer
tain-sure you'll not
know the joy and
contentment of a
friendly old jimmy
pipe or a hand rolled
cigarette unless you get on talking-terms
with Prince Albert tobacco!
P. A. comes to you with a real reason for all the
goodness and satisfaction it offers. It is made by •
a patented process that removes bite and parch!
You can smoke it long and hard without a come
back ! Prince Albert has always been sold without
coupons or premiums. We prefer to give quality 1
Prince Albert affords the keenest pipe and cigarette
enjoyment! And that flavor and fragrance and
coolness is as good as that sounds. P.A. just
answers the universal demand for tobacco
without bite, parch or kick-back!
Introduction to Prince Albert isn't any harder
than to walk into the nearest place that sells
You pay
out a little change, to be sure, but it's the cheer
fullest investment you ever made!
T Tm C o]
A\Udj l tS
fir
I*
h.
'
ii\.
1
TOBACCQjlS
FQR SMOKER
lift
Sfc
SS".
v
: fjJUtY'3<
4
lïïimj
ffflpft I
ETONGU
f n
•X'
n
iD]
D,
>0
,0
bit]
11
niirrtm
Prince Albert it told everywhere
toppy red bast, Sc; tidy red
ÔÆÂXîiï! tobacco and ask for "a supply of P. A.
that clever cryttal-glate pound
humidor with eponge-moittener
top that keept the tobacco in each
tpUndid condition.
in
9 y
NNCEr Albert
&
*
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., Winston-Salem, N. C. Copyright 1916 by R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.
a
■t
■M
I
1
Cost Less
9
%
than the plain tread styles of
several other standard makes«
When you buy a Fisk Non-Skid you get
the best tire on the market for a price that
is reasonable and right—the mileage
returns this year are better than ever»
Compare These Prices
Fisk Grey Non-Skid Casings
3 x 30 . . 10.40 41 x 35 . . 31.20
31 x 30 . . 13.40 4J x 36 . . 31.55
4 x 33 . . 22.00 5 x 37 . . 37.30
and remember that besides Fisk Quality there
is Fisk FREE service at more than 125 Direct
Branches.
*/
I
%
. 4 a
7 ilJ
on
ii* <
©
A
A
B
B
Brown & Joseph


Fbk Branches in More Than 125 Cities
111
m
m
negotiate loans on farm lands, at
low rates and on longtime. Not
loaned, and only on first mortgage
E, S. & J. T. & H. W. M. DltAXK
Â
f
#
v
jr
All Pointsin United States andCanada
CHI C AGO
- The gateway throudh which tourists
^destined to all points in the westr,
\ north west, north
and east- can
be routed t~o
Kg
1
m
y
3 mi
f
»V,
Commercial Stationery,
Plantation Stationery,
Molasses Labels» Etc,, at
MONEY TO LEND.—We can
more than forty per cent, of value
REVEILLE OFFICE,

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