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The Port Gibson reveille. [volume] (Port Gibson, Miss.) 1890-current, February 08, 1917, Image 3

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86090233/1917-02-08/ed-1/seq-3/

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THOSE AWFUL
. \
CRAMPS
I
Suggestions that may save
Much Suffering
iHe, Pa.—"F or twelve yean
with terrible cramps.
would have to stay
in bed several days
every month.
tried all kinds of
remedies and was
treated by doctors,
but my trouble con
tinued until one day
I read about Lydia
E. Pinkham's Vege
table Compound and
what it had done for
others.
and now I am never
troubled with cramps and feel like ' a
4 different woman. I cannot praise
Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Com
pound too highly and I am recommend
ing it to my friends who suffer as I did.
—Mrs. George R. Naylor, Box 72,
Marysville, Pa.
Young women who are troubled with'
painful or irregular periods, backache,
headache, dragging-down sensations,
fainting spells or indigestion should
take Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable
Compound. Thousands have been re
stored to health by this root and herb
remedy.
Write for free and helpful advice to
Lydia E. Pinkham Medicine Co. (con
fidential), Lynn, Mass. Only women'
oDen and read such letters.
Marysvu
f suffered
;Stjf
I tried it
;/..-v.ysÿ

*m c.okro.eh«
STEARNS' ELECTRIC PASTE
U. 8. Government Buys It
SOLD EVERYWHERE—23c maé $IM
Drug Store Episode.
"I can't sell you whisky without a
doctor's prescription."
"Then why do you advertise pickling
materials?" demanded the irate cus
tomer.
4
A HINT TO WISE WOMEN.
Don't suffer torture when all female
troubles will vanish in thin air after using
"Femenina." Price 50c and R1.00—Adv.
The miser who has money to burn
ought to take it with him when he
dies.
-
Nerves All On Edge?
. Juet as nerve wear is a cause of kid
ney weakness, so is kidney trouble a
cause of nervousness. Anyone who has
backache, nervousness, "blues," head
aches, dizzy spells, urinary ills and,a
tired, worn feelipg, would do well to try
Doan's Kidney Pill». This safe, relia
ble remedy is recommended by thou
sands who have had relief from just
such troubles.
A Mississippi Case
*>Mrs. N. V. Pruett,
109 , Madison St. f
Nftchez, M î s s . L h
says: "I had at
tàcks ' of kidney 1
trouble and suf
fered intensely A
from backache, m
Mornings, I felt ■
tired and worn out ■
and at night, I *1
couldn't rest com- Xe
fortably. In a short
time after I began R!
using Doan's Kid- \
ney Pills, I was
cured, t am glad to give this medi
cine the praise It deserves."
Get Dean's at Any Store, SOc »Box
KIDNEY
P ILLS
FOSTER-M1LBURN CO.. BUFFALO, N„ Y.
TmyPktia*
|S5eÄ>r7
DOAN'S
;
;
m
1
Vi
I**!
//
&
"Dat's as fine a goo« as I ever saw, Brudder WiU
liante. Where did you get it ?"
"Mistah Rawtey," laid the carver of the goose,
with dignity, "when you preach a special good sermon
1 never axes you where you got it Seems to me dat's
• triv'al matter anyway."
If anybody asks how you got nervous
Indigestion, constipation or dyspepsia
you couldn't tell, but If you want to
get rid of all such painful disorders
Green's
'August Flower
will act promptly in the relief of all
stomach and bowel troubles, and your
freedom from pain and discomfort
will make you feel that life is again
worth living. 25c and 75c at drug
gists and dealers. 51 yedrs of success.
Flour Is High
Why Mot Uvo Botter
And Save Money Too7
Grind your own wheat into beat Whole Wheat
or Graham Flour. Your doctor know* how
healthy these are. Make the Best Corn Meal, the
old-fashioned sort you can't buy at any price.
Do all sorts of grinding, coarse or fine with »
BLACK HAWK GRIST MILL
Will Bead One, Charges Prepaid For 83.00
WRITE FOR CIRCULARS
A. H. PATCH, lac., Clarksville, Tana.
Established 1886
the linstor utf Soli Maktr at Black Hawk Can Stullen.
DRIVE PAIN AWAY!
_ ; _._ '
With Hunt's Lightning Oil.
Rheumatism, neuralgia, sore mus
cles, headaches, cuts, burns and
y magic when
led to affected
bruises vanish as If b
Lightning Oil is appl
parts. No other liniment brings
snch quick and soothing relief.
Get a bottle of thiB Valuable home
remedy today. Druggists sell it
at 50 cents the bottle, or the A. B.
RICHARDS MEDICINE
Dept. Z, Shermap. Texts,
send it on receipt of price.
CO..
will
*
yji
9
t J •
•v ••
yJMERICAKSA-'TAftr corporation
GALL»®«
Aches In Stomaob, Bock, Side or Bboulders; Liver
Trouble«, Stomach Misery, Dyspepsia, Colic. Gas,
Biliousness, Headache, Oonstipat.on, Piles,Catarrh.
Nervousness, Bine», Jaundice, Appendicitis. These
Gallstone lymptoma—CAN BB CÜBBD.
for hoine treatment, Boo* <m £
»re conunoD
loi—d yOt^ Itopt. SZt t. Dtftrbgrm fit, Cfekmfo j
If free advice wns only a good fer
tiliser all farm lands would be rich.
Dr. Peery's "Dead Shot" not only expels
Worm» or Tapeworm but cleans out the
mucus tn which they breed and tones up
the digestion. One dose sufficient. • Adv.
South African mines are experiment
ing with a dust-laying preparation
which has molasses as its base.
The Quinine That Does Not Affect The Heed
» of Ita tonic end laxative effect. Laxative
Bromo Quinine can be taken by anyone without
causing nerrousnceeerrineint in the bead There
Is only one "Bromo Quinine.' B. W. QBOVH'8
signature is on each box. Ko.
I
stay
days
I
of
was
con
day
and
for
' a
72,
re
to
Not for Her.
He—Wifi you share my lot?
She—No; I do not care to brerik'Wild
laud.
Acid Stomach, Heartburn and Nausea
quickly disappear with the use of Wright'a
Indian Vegetable Pills. Send for trial box
Is 372 Pearl St., New York. Adv.
it
Probably Not.
Will the smoke inspector please ex
plain-why so much of the soft coal
soot settles on the white-haired dog?

IMITATION IS SINCEREST FLATTERY
but like counterfeit money the imita
tion has not the worth of the original.
Insist on "La Creole" Hair Dressing—
it's the original. Darkeds your hair in
the natural way, but contains no dye.
Price $1.00.—Adv.
Aviation.
Have you ever taken a flyer in the
market?"
"Yes," replied the rueful citizen.
"That's where I learned that riches
have wings.
I
••
ICK, 6L0SST HAIR
Girlffl Beautify Youi" Hair! Make It
. Soft, Fluffy and Luxuriant—Try
the Moist Cloth.
a
Try as you will, after an application
of Danderine, you cannot find a single
trace of dandruff or falling hair and
i your scalp will not itch, but what will
please you most, will be after a few
weeks' use, when you see new hair,
fine and downy at first—yes—but real
ly new hair—growing all over the
scalp.
A little Danderine Immediately dou
bles the beauty, of your hair.. No differ
ence how dull, faded, brittle and
! scraggy, just moisten a cloth with
; Danderine and carefully draw ' it
through your hair, taking one small
straid at a time. The effect is im
mediate and amazing—your hair will
be light, fluffy and wavy, and have an
appearance ot abundance ; an incom
parable luster, softness and luxuri
ance, the beauty and shimmer of true
hair health.
Get a 25 cent bottle of Knowlton's
Danderine from any store and prove
that your hair is as pretty and soft
as any—that it has been neglected or
injured by careless treatment—that's
all. Adv.
he
- 1
a
»
Very True. ,s *
Teacher—If I were to shoot at a
tree with five birds on it and kill three
how many woukl be left?
Betty—Three.
Teacher—No ; two would be left.
Betty—No,
The
three shot would be left and the other
two would have flied away.
there
wouldn't.
To Drive Out Malaria
And Build Up The System
Take the Old Standard GROVE'S
TASTELESS chill TONIC. You know
what you are taking, as the formula is
; printed on every label, showing it is
; Quinine and Iron in a tasteless form. The
Quinine drives out malaria, the iron -
builds up the system. 50 cents.
Radiating Love.
If you come into a room on a win
der's day, you do not-need -to see the
stove or the radiator to know there is
heat there. Every nerve in your body
tells you that, before you have a
chance to use your eyes. And there
are some people you cannot approach
without feeling the radiating warmth
of sympathy and kindness. Fill the
heart so full of love that/t can be felt
by all who come near you.
Pape's Diapepsin" settles sour,
gassy stomachs Jn five
minutes—Time it!
u
You don't want a slow remedy when
your stomach is bad—or an uncertain
one—or a harmful one—your stomach
is too valuable;, you mustn't injure it.
Pape's Diapepsin Is noted for its
speed in giving relief; its harmless
ness; its certain unfailing action in
regulating sick, sour, gassy stomachs.
Its millions of cures in indigestion,
dyspepsia, gastritis and other stomach
trouble has made it famous the world
ever. *
Keep this perfect stomach doctor in
your home—keep it handy—get a large
flfty-cent case from any dealer and
then if anyone styiuld eat something
which doesn't agree with them; if
what they eat lays like lead, ferments
and sours and forms gas; causes head
ache, dizziness and nausea; eructa
tions of acid and undigested food—
remember as soon as Pape's Diapepsin
comes in contact with the stomach all
such distress vanishes. Its prompt
ness, certainty and ease in overcoming
the worst stomach disorders is a reve
lation to those who try it.—Adv.
a
on
ing
the
she
so
to
the
or
The Kind.
That man is a regular prohibition
I -
Wit."
What kind is. that?"
"He has so mucl> dry humor.
1?
QNT SNIFFLE.
You can rla yourself
D
of that cold in
the head by taking Laxative Quinldine
Tablets. Price 25c. Also used in
cases of La Grippe and for--severe
^headaches. »Remember that.—-Adv.
Russia has more blind people than
the rest of the jgorld, two to* one,
j
A
fer
7
the
up
L
arV Marshall
n H H
V V
I WAS afternoon
recreation hour in
the Martin home,
and the dozen
. girls dressed In
fresh blue ging
ham frocks, sat
with heads eager
ly bent around
the long, low
table.
?
wl
I
o
Isn't this just
beautiful?" asked
Mildred, a girl of
twelve, ns she
held up a sheet of blue paper, decorat
ed with a border of tiny golden hearts.
There was a chorus of "Os!" from
the other girls as they looked up from
their cutting and pastiug.
"Who's your vaientlue for, Mildred?
asked one of the girls.
"Oh, It's.for the cook's little boy,
said Mildred. "Won't he like it,
though?" Mildréd looked at the red
paper roses of the girl who sat next to
her. "Who is yours for?" she asked.
"Mine is for the apple woman on the
corner," she answered. "She gave me
an apple once, and she always smiles
when we pass.
So it was that the girls who lived at
the Martin home had found friends to
send the valentines to. You see, they
had no friends on the outside world, for
they had all been brought as waifs into
the kind care of Mrs. Titus, the matron,
or "mother," of the home.
But little blue-eyed June could think
of no one in all the world to send her
valentine to, and yet she sat there, with
eager little fingers, cutting out dozens
of red hearts and arrows.
She was beginning to paste the gold
letters on a sheet of blue paper whën
Mildred caught sight of It.
Look what June is doing," she said.
"Isn't it pretty? Why, she cuts as nice
hearts as us big girls. Who are you
going to send It to, June?
Little June hung her head and looked
timidly at Mildred. "It's for some
body," she said; "for my valentine.
I don't believe she knows herself,
said another girl, scornfully, and then
they all went on with their work, too
much Interested In what they were
doing to ask June any more about It.
Just as June had the last gold "e
pasted on the blue paper Mrs. Titus,
the matron, came into the room.
"It's four o'clock, girls," she said ;
time to put the tilings away.
Quickly each child placed her scis
sors/ paste and papers into her own
little workbox and put it into the cup
board at the end of thb room. Then
each one went about the special duty
that had been given to her for the
V t
J
-

»»

••
»>
j
w<
v$s June's turn"fe the kitchen, for;
although she was only seven/ she had
been taught to help with the dally du
ties of the home.
"Here, June, my girl," said the cook,
"you fill these salt shakers. That's u
nice task for little fingers. Now, mind
you don't spill any."'
June stood at the long kitchen table,
carefully spooning out salt into the
glass salt shakers. As shè did so she
looked up from time to time at her
friend, the cook, who semed to be do
ing a dozen things at once, making
cocoa for .supper, watching the molas
ses cake in the oven—my, how good it
smelled as she opened the oven door !—
directing the girls who were cutting
the bread, talking, laughing and work
ing all at once.
"Wouldn't it be nice if she had two
little boys at home," thought Juue, "so
that I could send my valentine to one
of them. Perhaps she has a mother or
a father or a relation who would like
mine."
A moment later, when the cook
passed by the table, June whispered
very timidly, "Mrs. Dawson, have yon
all
a
-
up
To
sat
the
tus
had
ful
tus
ft
a f+i
V-
L/ ♦ W ,
T*
'U
,i'
Jl*
S;.
«
Mrs.
she
had
fehe
only
her
laid
the
must
the
but
away
She
est
that
she
;fif
A
fof
Could Think of No One to Send It To.
a mother or a father or a relation at
home?"
Only my little son, bless you, child,
said the cook, as she* laid a kind hand
on June's shoulder. . -
"Thank you, Mrs. Dawson,"
At supper, when all the girls sat
around the table with Mrs. Titus, the
mother, at the head, June was still try
ing to' think of someone to send her
valentine to ; and during the play Pour
that follov'wL when the girls were al
lowed to..sing and dance to their
hearts' content, little June, usually the
merriest of them all, sat in a corner, of
the room puzzling about her valentine.
Suddenly it came upon her, and when
she had once thoftgh of It it seemed
so strange that she hadn't thought of it
before. She would take her valentine
to the lovely lady In the park, whom
the girls met almost every day, driving j
or sometimes walking. She always nod- j little
-

11
U
*r. -i
-• . .V -
tied to them ns they passed, nnd Jun
had imagined, just as r.ii the other
girls had imagined, that the Indy's
sweet smile was meant especially for
her.
Then It occurred to June that her
valentine wasn't good enough for the
lovely lady. The little hearts and gold
letters seemed so rough and Imperfect
as she recalled them, and she longed to
ask Mrs. Titus for a penny to buy one
of the printed card valentines she had
seen in the store windows. ïou see,
June didn't realize that a handmade
valentine would bring much more love
nnd thought than the sort she could
buy.
in
In
sat
low
That night, when the six big girls
had gone to their sleeping rooms, and
the very little girls were sound asleep
in the nursery, and June and the five
other medium little girls were In their
sleeping room, June went to her own
small drawer in the big bureau at oue
end ofi the room. Here each little girl
kept her own personal, cherished pos
sessions, the few things she had
brought with her from the great out
side world and the chance possessions
she had acquired in the home.
June had very little. There was a
piece of paper lace she had saved from
a box of Christmas candy, a few empty
spools, which for some reason she had
become especially attachdfi to, and the
locket, the little gold locket and chain
she had had about her neck when, over
five years ago, she had been brought,
hungry and dirty, into the home .from
the street whore she had been found.
This locket was the most prized of
all her possessions, not so much for the
little chain and case/but for the ring
of golden hair inside.
June opened the case with a little
pink finger nail and looked long at the
glossy curl tied with a tiny bow of
blue ribbou. Then, when no one was
looking, she took out the little, crystal
that protected it and slipped the treas
ure out from the locket.
That's for my valentine," she said
to herself, as she laid the curl in the
drawer where she could easily get it In
the morning.
After she had gone to sleep that
night she dreamed dreams of little red
paper hearts and lovely ladies with
golden curls and blue silk dresses, and
of
she
it,
to
me
at
to
;
\ l
% ^
/J
1
••
I
t
,1
2 J
"This Is Yours, Lady.
»»
all the time she dreamed she thought
she was standing in the kitchen filling
a gigantic salt tellur while the cook
made the cocoa.
The next day was St. Valentine's
day, and. when the children took their
walk-in the park June watched eagerly
every carriage that passed them, but
the lovely lady did not appear. Finally,
wtyen she had almost given up all
hopes of seeing her, June saw her
walking toward them. As she passed
June slipped her valentine with the
little curl pasted on it into the lady's
hand.
"This is yours, lady," she said, and
then she ran back to the girls, who
thought that June had merely picked
up something that the lady had
dropped.
All that day June was carried away
with joy—the kind of joy that she had
never known about before, for all she
had been so well cared for in the home.
To think that she had a real true valen
tine—a sort of relation, no doubt—and
that it was a secret she was keeping
from the other girls, was enough to
make the day the most remarkable she
could remember.
The next morning, when all the girls
sat in the schoolroom and June was
working anxiously over her copybook,
the door suddenly opened and Mrs. Ti
tus came Into the room.
She smiled, as she always did, and
then she said; "June, will you please
come here.
Little Jyne rose with trembling
knees, for she half expected that she
had done wrong in sending the beauti
ful lady a valentine and that Mrs. Ti
tus had found it out.
It was not until June had followed
It
a
it
'*
Mrs. Titus into, the reception room that
she found out that the beautiful lady
had called to see her.
"You call her June," the lady began
eagerly. "That name was on the paper
fehe gave me. My little girl's name was
Alfreda. She left us when she was
only two years old.
'Tes,", said Mrs. Titus. "She was
brought here the first of June, five
years ago, and that is why we called
her jjune.
The lady gave a half cry of delight.
Then Mrs. Titus asked June to go up
stairs and get the little locket. In a
minute June had got the treasure and
laid it into the lady's hand.
"Oh, ray darling little Alfreda !" cried
the lady, as she stooped down and
seized the child in her arms.
While June nestled in the beautiful
lady's arms Mrs. Titus told exactly
where the lost child had been found.
"We always thought that someone
must have stolen her from us," said
the lady when the matron had finished,
but she must have crawled or toddled
away when, the purse wasn't looking."
She looked at the child with the soft
est of eyes. "But why did you give me
that little paper with the lock of hair?"
she asked.
Cause I wanted you to be my vai
*'
> i,
in
entine," said the child, as s]
little red lips up for a Mss.
to
11
got
tub
U 9
i
, :W I
COSSACKS LOYAL TO CZAR
»
Traveler in Russia Asserts • These
Troops Are the Backbone of Rus
sia—Their Part in History.
"Few persons who have followed
the' progress of the European war, and
particularly the part Russia has played
In the struggle, knew the origin of the
Cossacks, who have played an impor
tant part in ail the battles." remarked
H. A. Bryant of New Mexico, a world
traveler, who recently came back from
several months spent in Russia. "Cos
sack is a Tartar word. In the sixteenth
century the term was used all over
Russia to designate floating labor. In
Moscow mercenary soldiers were
called Cossacks. In southwestern Rus
sia the Little Russians made serfs by
the Polish gentry known as Shliachta
escaped into the steppes to the so
called Ukrnina, where they organised
into bands to tight the invading Tar
tars, and there originated the Little
Russian Cossack.
"The Cossacks constitute the most
loyal body of men the emperor has to %
this day. It was told in the last revo
lution that an ultimatum was sent to
the Jews by the Cossacks to, the effect
that if they did not discontinue their
agitation against the czar the Cossacks
would march against thejn 500,000
strong and annihilate them. This dec
laration had its effect, and while some
few soldiers mutinied, no Cossack was
found wanting. The Cossacks are the
backbone of Russia ; take them away
and Russia would almost go to pieces.
Socially the Cossacks are delightful,
big-hearted people, hospitable and jol
ly. In many ways they resemble the
cowboys as they were 20 years ago in
the West. Like the cowboys, they
excellent shots, even better riders,
though they canaot handle a lasso at
a
are
all.
Icelandic Conditions.
Iceland, which has just resumed di
rect commercial relations with us,
after centuries during whicli no Ice
landic ship ever visited our shores,
furnishes an example of what can be
done by a determined people under ad
verse physical conditions,
short growing season, not much soil
and little feed for cattle, yet its peo
ple live lives of singular freedom and
on the whole are ambng the happiest
on the globe,
debt, no paupers, no saloons, and,
cording to the Christian Herald, the
schools and churches are prospering,
while libraries are well patronized and
education is highly valued. Because
of lack of raw materials the island
can never hope to become a manufac
turing community and its people never
will be rich in the accepted sense of
the term, but they are contented. The
purpose of the recent visit of an Ice
landic ship to American shores
to develop a market for fish caught in
northern waters, the war having had
an adverse efipect on the market in
Europe. Iceland Is now the only
place in the world where the ancient
Norwegian is spoken, that - language
having remained practically unchanged
since it was taken there by the early
settlers some nine centuries ago.
It has a
There is no national
ac
was
Bruin, the Vagabond.
The men in the smoking compart
ment fell to talking about nimals
ns pets. A man sitting over in the
corner had listened interestedly to the
others, then It came his turn.
"I live in Seward, Alaska," he said.
"Up there is an old brown bear that
is one of the town characters. He. for
several years, has had the privileges
of Seward, wandering wherever he
likes. He gets his meals at the back
doors of the hotel. The kitchen doors
of several homes also provide Brownie
with provender.
"Lately, though. Brownie has become
a municipal problem. He took to drink.
He developed the habit of dropping in
at the bars and drinking with the
men. Everybody was willing to buy
him a glass of. beer. But, with every
phase of human nature working In
his soul, he got to taking too much
and just before I left; they had to
put him in jail.
Some of the boys are talking of
raising money to give him a cure.
n

Cooking Wild Ducks.
A camp chef gives a number of im
portant "don'ts" which apply to the
preparation of wild ducks for the
table. Don't bleed or draw or pluck
the bird until the last moment; don't
hold it over a week to let it get "high,
or subject it to a refrigerating process
to make it tender; don't stuff it with
bread crumbs, potatoes, oysters, or
chestnuts; don't lay It on Its back
while roasting, and don't, above all, al
low it to become overdone. # Affirma
tlvely, pluck and draw the bird, wipe
It off with a wet cloth, place*it kreast
downward, in u covered pan, put It In
a very hot oven, and allow it to re
main there for not less than 20 and
not more than 25 minutes. If a wild
duck Is cooked too long, if blood does
not follow the cut of the knife when
it is carved, it will not have the true
wild celery flavor, and—a bird in the
air Is worth two on the platter if the
cook bungles his art.—All Outdoors.
in
What Is a Customer?
Marjorie, three years old, was a kin
dergarten pupil. One of the games
played one morning was "the store."
Miss Nettie wished the children to un
derstahd what they were playing, so
began asking questions about differ
ent features of a store. Finally she
said, "Does anyone know what cus
Marjorie, the youngest
tomeYs are?
in the class, raised her hdnd immedi
ately, and Miss Nettie, surprised that
the child seemed so sure of her knowl
edge, said : "Well, Marjorie, what are
customers?"
She answered in an instant: "Dey's
to spit in."—Indianapolis News. ' .
Can't Be Done.
Madam—The noise you make in the
kitchen is simply unbearable.
Cook—Well, try to break four dishes
yourself without making a noise.—
Meggendorfer Blnetter (Munich).
! Tedious Job.
Mistress—Have you got the spilt
peas ready, Annie?
Annie—Heavens, no, ma'am ! I've
got threç hundred and twenty-nine
tub split yet}. .,•» ....
I Guarantee "Dodson's Liver Tone" Will Give You the Best Liver
and Bowel Cleansing You Ever Had—Doesn't Make You Sick!
Stop using calomel! It makes you
sick. Don't lose a day's work. If you
feel lazy, sluggish, bilious or consti
pated, listen to me!
Calomel is mercury or Quicksilver
which causes necrosis of the bones.
Calomel, when It comes into contact
with sour bile, crashes into it, breaking
It up. This is when you feel that aw
ful nausea and cramping. If you feel
"all knocked out," If' your liver Is tor
pid* and bowels constipated or you
have headache, dizziness, coated
tongue, if breath is bad or stomach
sour just try a spoonful of harmless
Dodson's Liver Tone.
Here's my guarantee—Go to any
drug store or dealer and get a 50-cent
bottle of Dodson's Liver Tone. Take a
$ Sold for 47 yean. For
Malaria, Chills & Fever.
Also a Fine General
Strengthening Tonic.
(hbllTonic
80c and 01.00 at all
Dru| Stare a.
DISTEMPER
CATARRHAL FEVER
AND ALL NOSE
AND THROAT DISEXSE9
Cures the sick and acts as a preventative for others.
Liquid riven on the tongue. Safe for brood mares and
__, fi f all others.. Best kidney remedy. 50 cents a bottle, $5 a
vJXjhffiV/Ay doxen. Sold by all druggists and turf roods houses, or sent.
VWJjiFTdy express paid, by the manufacturers. Booklet, "Distem
NÇjÇfl CSfr per, Cause and Cure," free.
» SPOHN MEDICAL CO., Chemists, Goshen, Ind„ U. 8. JU
PINK EYE
Fer
fr OHy y
$
V
*
o
Ö
all
m
None Is Perfect.
Take a chisel and chip around the
feet of almost any popular idol and
flecks of clay will fall off on the floor.
It was discovered the other morning
that Sir Rabindranath Tagore sends
picture post cards, back to his relatives
in Bengal.—Kansas City Star.
BREAD WITHOUT SALT IS TASTELESS
«V medicine chest without Magic Ar
nica Liniment is useless. Best of all
liniments for sprains, swellings,
biuises. rheumatism and neuralgia.
Three sizes, 25c, 50c and $1.00.—Adv.
News to Him.
"I've come to tell you," began the
young man, "that I'm going to get mar
ried next week.
"Well, what of it?" roared his em
ployer, scenting a request for a raise.
"Why tell me your troubles?"
"I thought possibly you might be
interested. You see, it's your daugh
ter I'm going to marry.
•»
ii
LIVER, BOWELS
For sick headache, bad breath,
Sour Stomach and
constipation.
s
Get a 30-cent box now.
No odds how bad your liver, stomach
or bowels; how much your head
aches, how miserable and uncomfort
able you are from constipation, Indiges
tion, biliousness and sluggish bowels
—you always get the desired results
with CascaVets.
Don't let your stomach, liver and
bowels make you miserable. Take
Cascarets to-night; put an end to the
headache, biliousness, dizziness, nerv
ousness, sick, sour, gassy stomach,
backache and all other distress;
cleanse your inside organs of all the
bile, gases and constipated matter
which is producing the misery.
A 10-cent Box means health, happi
ness and a clear head for months.
No more days of gloom and distress
if you will take a Cascaret now and
then. All stores sell Cascarets. Don't
forget the children—their little in
sides need a cleansing, too. Adv.
Charity is what commonly stays at
home when the millionaire's cheque
gges out.
Sore Eyes. Blood-Shot Eyes. Watery Eyea,
Sticky Eyea, all healed promptly with night
ly applications of Homan Eye Balsam. Adv.
Mecca's pilgrim's annually exceed
100,000. .
100 Years Old$
If
The kidneys play a most important
part in causing premature old age and
death—the more injurious the poisons
passing thru the kidneys the sooner
comes decay"—so says a distinguished
physician, who further advises all people
who are past thirty to preserve the vitality
of the kidneyB and free the blood from
poisonous elements, such as uric acid—
drink plenty of water—sweat some daily
and take An uric before meals.
Ibis Anuric is put up in tablet
form, and can be obtained at almost
any drug store. For that backache,
lumbago, rheumatism, "rusty!' joints,
swollen feet or hands, due to uric acid
in the blood, Anuric quickly
the uric acid as hot water d<
dissolves
oes sugar.
Discovered by Dr. Pierce of Buffalo, N. Y.
Prevent premature old age by simply
sipping a cup of hot water every morning
breakfast, taking a little Anuric
a hundred.
before
before meals and live to
OR
€.
M
Bob baby's chest and titrent
with MENTH -ALBA. It's
healing oils, vaporised by tit*
beat of tho body, will poao
Fcr eel da apply a little up the
nos trill. It qikkly vaporises
and tho vapor penetrates ta
träte to th.e inflamed tissue
ap tho head and healing the
r and Instantly relieve the con
gestion and choking.
Irritation that baa been casa
teg the cold.
I MENTH- ALBA I
&
=
spoonful and if it doesn't straighten
you right up and make you feel tine
and vigorous I want you to go back to
the store and get your money. Dod
son's Liver Tone Is destroying the
sale of calomel because It is real liver
medicine; entirely vegetable, therefore
it cannot salivate or make you sick.
I guarantee that one spoonful of
Dodson's Liver Tono will put your
sluggish liver to work and clean your
bowels of that sour bile and consti
pated waste which is clogging your
system and making you feel miserable.
I guarantee that a bottle of Dodson's
Liver Tone will keep your Atire fam
ily feeling fine for months. Give it to
your children. It is harmless; doesn't
gripe and they like its pleasant taste.
—Adv.
Whether it Is harmless gossip or dan
gerous scandal often depends upon the
fellow who is talking.
To keep clean and healthy take Dr.
Pierce's Pleasant Pellets. They regulate
liver, bowels and stomach.—Adv.
If you want good neighbors, be one
yourself.
WHAT IS
LAX-FOS
LAX-FOS is an improved Gascara
A DISESTIVE LAXATIVE-Pleasant to tike
In LAX-FOS the Cascara is improved by
addition of certain harmless chemicals
which increase the efficiency of the Caa
earn, making it tetter than ordinary Cas
cara. LAX-FOS aids digestion; pleasant
to take; does not gripe or disturb stomach.
Adapted to children and adults. Just try a
bottle for constipation or indigestion. 50c.
— Ä
STOCK LICK IT-STOCK LIKE IT
For Horses, Cattle, Sheep
and Hogs. Contains Cop
peras for Worms, Sulphur
for the Blood, Saltpeter
for the Kidneys, Nux
Vomica,aTonic, and Pure
Dairy Salt. Used by Vet
erinarians 12 years.
Dosing. Drop Brick in
feed-box. Ask your dealer
for Blackman's or write
ST
No
m
BLACKMAN STOCK REMEDY COMPANY
CHATTANOOGA. TENNESSEE
Constipation
Vanishes Forever
Prompt Relief— Permanent Cure
CARTER'S LITTLE
LIVER PILLS never
fail. Purely vegeta
ble — act surely a
but gently on Æ
the liver. Âmk
Stop after Jtnää
dinner dis
tress—cure Jr
indigestion,
improve the complexion, brighten the eyesu
SMALL PILL, SMALL DOSE, SMALL PRICE,
Genuine must bear Signature
Carters
KITTLE
Hiver
li PILLS.
I . PARKER'S
HAIR BALSAM _
A toilet preparation of merit.
Helps to eradleate dandruff.
For Rostoriaff Color and
Ben u tj to Cray or Faded Hoir.
60c. and $ 1.00 at Dracctota.
y
FROST PROOF CABBAGE PLANTS. AU
varieties; 500, $1.10; 1,000, $24)0' postpaid.
By express. 1,000, $1.25; oyer 4,000, $1.00 per
1,000. Strong hardy plants. Piedmont Plant
Co., Dept. X, Albany, Ga. A Greenville. 8. C.
"ROUfiH ofl RATS"S^Ä M M«:
W. N. U., MEMPHIS, NO. 6-1917.
THE REFLECTIONS OF A MARRIED
WOMAN- —are not pleasant
î If she is delicate, run-down,
*or over worked. She feels
"played out." Her smile
and her good spirits have
taken flight It worries
her husband as well as
herself. ,
ThIs Ja the time
build up her
ÏV strength and,
cure those
weaknesses
v. u or ailments
which are Wa-^the seat of her
trouble. Dr. Pierce's Favorite Prescrip
tion regulates and promotes all the proper
functions of womanhood, enriches the
blood, dispels aches a fid pains, melan
choly and nervousness, brings refresh
ing sleep, and restores health and
strength. It cures those disorders and
derangements incident to womanhood.
A well-known agent which can bo
procured at all drug stores is "Pleasant
Pellets," made up of the May-apple,
dried inice of the leaves of aloes and
root of jalap. First put out by Dr. Pierce
nearly fifty years ago. —Adv.
Art
/
\
tho
iho

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