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The Port Gibson reveille. [volume] (Port Gibson, Miss.) 1890-current, August 02, 1917, Image 2

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THE REVEU.LE
TELEPHONE NO. a«
THURSDAY, AUG: 2. 1917
■ : H. CRIBLER.
uftscmmoN price. S2 per year
HHntered at the Poatofflce at Port Otbaox.Mlaa
a aecond-claaa mail matter
y Because this country bas never
before been in a great foreigo war,
the vastness of the preparations
being made by the United States
may not be grasped by the average
American, but thinking men ol
other countries understand how
prodigious are these preparations
and how suddenly a peace-loving
democracy has become a war giant
and a toe to be dreaded. Com
mealing on this subject a notec
Russian newspaper writer says :
The first steps taken by tb«
Washington government lor plac
ing the United States in a state oi
war revealed a methodical char
acter m jre akin to German meas
ures than to those of the Allies.
They were all deeply thought out,
and from the beginning systemat
ically carried out on a large scale.
One sees in them a sense of gi
gantic proportions, such as is re
llected by the vastness of American
territory. There is in them a full
er aud more consistent application
of science and of technique than
was the case in Europe. The
combination of bold schemes and
of practical execution which dis
tinguisbed American industrial
undertakiugs is very prominent iu
the American organization of war.
The part which is beiog acted
by the United States in this strug
gle is the strongest vindication of
the democratic form of government.
It proves that a free democracy
entirely given to the works of
peace is able to organize itself tor
a world war, and is determined to
shirk no effort or sacrifice for the
sake of its ideals. This speaks
also most highly for the genius
and the character of the American
natiou, the greatness of which is
now being fully revealed for tbe
first time.
< 1
< 1
r>
The task of tbe local Exemption
Board is a very difficult and un
pleasant one, especially so when it
is considered that its members are
working without pay; but it is
gratitying to note that there seems
to be no disposition on the part of
any of the young men, who have
been called to shirk. Some of
them will have to make sacrifices,
no doubt; but tbe call of tbeir
country bas been beard, and they
seem willing to answer. Many of
them will return to their homes
after the conflict bearing honors
bravely won. Claiborne bas - al
ways ranked high iu this respect,
and we believe it will staud second
to none on this occasion. It
furnished two geuerals, nearly a
score of captaius,. and more sold
iers than it bad voters during tbe
Civil War.
Three Boys Join Army.
Three Claiborne county boys
joined the United States army re
cently. Ford H. Smith, son of B.
W. Smith of In?more, passed the
physical examination at Jackson.
He was sent to tbe army camp in
Georgia for a few days and trans
ferred to Foit Sam Houston, Tex
as, last week.
Lloyd Bridgets of Hermanville
joined the army at Akron, Ohio,
where be was working. He is said
to have been tbe first in that town
of 9 C 00 inhabitants to answer the
call to war. He is tbe youngest
son of Mr. and Mrs. D. I. Bridgers
of Hermanville.
Walter Sorrell, son of Mrs. T.
T. Bailey of Port Gibsou, passed
the physical examination at Vicks
burg last week and will soon go in
training for tbe signal corps. Wal
ter spent several years in Mexico,
and while there served as a soldier
in Villa's army. For several
months be held a major's commis
sion. It is doubtful whether the
Mexican method of fighting will
be of material benefit in France,
but Mr. Sorrell's experience as a
soldier will be worth much'to him
individually.
Two cotton blooms were report
ed this week, the first of tbe reas
öd. They were found Monday on
tbe places of J. B. Allen and H.
M. J itche. This is later tbau tbe
first bobs reported last year,
FIRST DRAFT FOR
NEW U. S. ARMY
(Continued from Pint Page)
The following have been called to report at the court bottle At
8 o'clock on the morning of Tuesday, August 7th:
61 Arthur Harper, Hankinson.
62 Sam Neal, Utica, Route 2.
63 Vertuer W. Killian, Port Gibson.
64 Louis Hughes, Barland.
t>5 Burnett Smith, Humphreys.
66 Arthur W. Watson, Port Gibson.
67 Henry Grigsby, Wilsonville.
68 Willie C. Trevillion, Willows.
Lucian Mundane, Hermanville.
70 George L. Disbaroon, Port Gibson.
Garfield McDonald, Pattison.
Henry Trevillion, Violet.
Lucian A. Ford, Carlisle.
John Coffee, Grand Gulf.
Alex Johnson, Utica, Route 2.
William A. Hennington, Pattison.
Richard Burrell, Insmore.
Floyd Moore, Port Gibson.
Birtrum L. Vardaman, Hermanville.
80 Rogers Smith, Hankinson.
81 Frances M. Brevard, Hermanville.
William H. Hudson, Port Gibson.
Karl Wilson, Port Gibson.
84 Alex Jones, Pattison.
Toney Gettls, Hermanville.
86 Allen Smith, Jr., Wilsonville.
87 Chester A. Hatchle, Utica, Ronte 2.
88 Richard Thomas, Hermanville.
Frank Johnson, Westslde.
Stephen Schillig, Port Gibson.
Robert E. Fife, Pattison.
Carl W. Blomquist, Port Gibson.
Robert Blackburn, Port Gibson.
George M. Russum, Russutn.
Louis Graise, Wilsonville.
96 Climie Smith, Utica, Route 2.
James T. Clarke, Humphreys.
98 Sullivan Rogers, Hermanville.
Frank J< pper, Hermanville.
100 Daniel E. Westrope, Barland.
101 Jesse Byrnes, Hermanville.
102 Dart Williams, Hermanville.
103 Dorsey Smith, Russum.
104 Frank Hayes, Hermanville.
105 Ambrose Parsons, Port Gibson.
106 Thomas Barnes, Rocky Springs.
107 Stockman Saddler, Pattison.
108 John W. Stampley, Port Gibson. [
ioq Sampson Minor, Togo, La.
no Dan Currie, Port Gibson.
111 Fred Banks, Hermanville.
112 Peter Davis, Jr., Port Gibson.
113 John S. Bedford, Jr., Hermanville.
114 Hatnp Alexander, Rocky Springs.
115 Andrew Jackson, Hermanville.
116 John M. Webb, Port Gibson.
117 David Caraway, Port Gibson.
William Bates, Port Gibson.
119 Andrew Dunbar, Rodney.
120 Charles M. Giliis (Gettlsj, Hermanville.
The following have been called to report at the court bouse on
Wednesday, August 8th, at 8 A. M.:
121 William H. Houston, Barland
122 John R. Callender, Port Gibson.
123 John Mimms, Pattison.
124 Ned Freeman, Willows.
125 John E. Bunting, Port Gibsou.
126 Hal S. Headley, Port Gibson.
127 James W. Frazier, Hermanville.
128 Jack C. Banks, Port Gibson.
129 Thomas H. Van, Willows.
130 Robert Butler, Port Gibson.
131 George Simpson, Utica, Route 2.
132 Alfred Hargrave, Rodney.
L- S. Pearson, Jr., Port Gibson.
Will Leazey, Hermanville.
135 Stephen T. Thrasher, Port Gibson.
136 Fred Killingsworth, Port Gibson.
137 Rothwell Middleton, Port Gibson.
138 David Watson, Port Gibson.
139 Sidney L. Regan, Carlisle.
140 Hugh Starks, Grand Gulf,
William i. Floyd, Utica, Route 2.
142 Frank L- Goepel, Port Gibson.
Ezekiel Moore, Port Gibson.
144 Price Jackson, Barlow.
145 Arthur Johnson, Grand Gnif.
146 J. B. Goza, Hermanville.
147 Percy Claiborne, Pattison.
148 William Jackson, Jr., Wilsonville.
Henry D. Bufkin, Wilsonville.
150 Robert Wheat, Violet.
151 Minor M. Coleman, Westside.
152 Peter C. Barnes, Hermanville.
153 Levi Williams, Pattisan.
154 Ned Marshall, Port Gibson.
155 Hiram Newman, Peyton.
156 Sam Johnson, Hermanville.
157 Jim Watson, Port Gibson.
158 J. C. Goodrum, Jr., Port Gibson
159 Thomas Nailor, Hermanville.
160 Horace Jones, Hermanville.
161 Ben Gaines, Port Gihson.
162 Louis Goodrum, Port Gibson.
163 Ernest L. Levy, Port Gibson.
164 Willie Slater, Pattison.
165 Ben Scott, Barland.
166 George Cabbage, Carlisle.
167 J. Mack Jones, Violet.
168 John Payne, Hermanville.
169 Ben Bird, Barland.
170 Edward Coleman, Westside.
Tillman Mitchell, Tillman.
George Washington, Port Gibson.
William H. Martin, Violet.
William Conner, Carlisle.
Robert B. Pickett, Carlisle.
176 Richard H. Anderson. Nanachehaw.
177 William Bolton, Tillman.
178 Richard King, Port Gibson.
Joseph W. Strong, Utica, Route 4
t8o Ben Sorrells, Wilsonville.
69
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
82
83
85
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
97
99
118
133
134
141
143
149
I7I
172
173
174
175
179
WILL BORE FOR OIL
Oklahoma Man Will Try Aban
doned Section.
The "oil field" about twelve
miles southwest of Port Gibson
promises to again attract the at
tention of local "get rich quick
folks. This time an Oklahoma
man is to take up the project and
sink a well, it is said. He has
secured a lease on the property of
Mrs. Berkley, and expects to be
gin operations about Oct. ist.
A few years ago a man named
Zink "blew in" and stated that he
bad located an oil field in the al
most mountainous section of
southwest Claiborne. He talked
much of the "anticline" under
which be could almost see a great
gusher. Several thousands of
dollars was soon subscribed and a
well, with varied promises and dis
appointments, was snnk to a depth
of about 1800 feet. Then the
money gave out; Zink "blew out,
and the project was abandoned.

COUNTRY TALK.
Cypress Log 70 Feet Deep. Oats
Fed to Hogs.
Bermuda grass which goes un
der various names according to
locality as wire grass, blue grass,
St. Lucie grass and Scutch grass,
is said to have been imported to
America from Bermuda in 1807,
and that Cowles Mead of Missis
sippi introduced it. It is time to
destroy this theory and origin of
Bermuda grass. It is one of the
grasses that is indigenous to tbe
southern part of the North Amer
ican continent, and originated in
(be Scutcbillo Mills of Claiborne
county where it was called Scutcb
grass by tbe Indians and natives
of the 181b century. The Choc
taw Iadians gave it tbe name of
Atocha (corrupted with Scutch)
grass which means Pass grass be
cause it grew in tbe deep ravines
of the northeastern part of Clai
borne county. Therefore Scutcb
grass is tbe proper name for Ber
muda, and we should insist on it
by stockmen and writers. We
Mississippians whenever a new
plant of native birth is discovered,
let other statt« appropriate the
honor of its birth, e. g., tbe Ken
tucky Wonder bean. A Missis
sippi bean was taken to Kentucky,
and was bestowed a stolen appel
lation.
A bored well was being sunk on
one of tbe highest elevations in
the county. When 70 feet was
struck, the well digger bored
through a cypress log. He quit at
that point, as no water was maoi.
fest. This shows that our hills
were once level.
The extreme drouth is oow over.
It was a period of bathing parties
in Bayou Pierre by tbe boys and
girls of tbe neighborhood. One
such swimming party was given
by tbe Insmore community with
varigated bathing suits and caps
that would have done credit to a
seashore resort of fashionables.
Wednesday was the event for these
bathers, who, after enjoyiog them
selves, where invited by that
charming hostess, Mrs. A. G.
Smith, Insmore plantation, to a
watermelon party.
K. L. Farris, Weat Hermitage
plantation, find Eugene Clark,
Clark farm, shipped from Carlisle
one car load of mixed bogs, 91
bead, to Natchez. They were
finished on oats, the English
method to harden pork on foot.
Prices netted were tbe highest yet
received by Claiborne swinemen.
K. L. Ferris sold over 1000
bushels of McKay oats to a famous
southern seedsman, and they are
being sold by him without waiting
for tbe oat planting season.
|. F. M.
Rejected Patriot Finally Succeeds.
Joseph E. Tones, only son of A.
E. Jones of Hermanville, tried
months ago to join tbe United
States navy, but was rejected on
physical examination. Determined
to serve his country on tbe firing
line, he presented himself again,
this time for tbe army,' and was
accepted on examination. He
leaves this week to train as a sol
dier for the American expedition
to France. Patriotism has its re
ward here.
.Cure for Cholera florbus.
/'When,opr Htfle boy, qow seven years
pld, was a baby jie ipas pured qf cholera
morbus by Chamberlain's Colip, Cholera
and Diarrhoea Remedy," writes Mrs. Sid^
ney Simmons, Fair Hâven, N. Y. "Since
then other members of my family have
used this valuable mediciue for colic and
bowel trouble with good satisfaction and I
gladly endorse it as a remedy of exception
obtainable everywhere:
Advertisement
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NEIL CALLAHAN]
WILIAM MCLELAM
The Vicksburs Boiler & Iron Works
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MANUFACTURERS OF
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Marine and Plantation Wor a Specialty. First Class Mechanics Sent Out on Repair Work
VICKSBURG. MISS.

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What You Want When You Want It.
None of our customers have ever had to
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we couldn't supply their needs.
SEE US FOR
LUMBER AND BUILDING MATERIAL
KELLEY CURRIE
PRES. AND MGR.
CENTRAL LUM9ER CO.
Mill and Church Sts., Jackson, Miss.
Telephone Troubles
BELL Telephone employees are con
stantly trying to prevent trouble of any
kind in the workings of the equip
ment, and to repair such troubles as soon
as possible after they occur.
Subscribers are asked to report trouble
immediately, and to exercise a reasonable
patience while it is being cleared.
If you do not see a man actually
working on your telephone, it does not
mean that you are not receiving proper
attention.
The difficulty may be at the switch
board, in the cable or at any one of sev
eral other places. Two or three men may
be at work hunting it down.
It is always our first consideration to
clear troubles promptly.
a
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CUMBERLAND TELEPHONE a
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Incorporated
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Dr. Miles'
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my nerves were quieted,
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recommended Dr. Miles' Nervine
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and
NERVINE
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IF FIRST BOTTLE FAILS TO
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Commercial Stationery,
Plantation Stationery,
Molasses Labels, Etc., at
REVEILLE OFFICE.
Port Gibson, Miss.
An up-to-date preparatory school for
boys. ' »
Military discipline under competent in
structor.
Only a limited uumber of boarders.
Building modern, steam heated, well
ventilated.
Swimming pool,shower baths,free to all.
Courses of study broad. •'
Every boy studies the Bible.
No malaria. No serious Illness in thir
ty-eight years.-' - "
Expenses the lowest; $220.
Write for catalog and folders. .
C. T. THOMSON, D.D.
President.
Patronize
Ml
THE OLDEST SCHOOL FOR GIRLS in Hie SHIT
Curriculum in harmony with the lates
educational requirements, faculty strong
health record splendid, buildings commo
dious, sanitary and comfortable, premise
attractive.
Attendance on the présent session better
than usual,
For illustrated catalogue, and special n
formation, address
REV. T. J. O'NEIL, President.
Port Gibson. Miss.
Cuts* Burns,
Bruises. Sores, Wounds and Piles
quickly healed with Arnica Salve.
It prevents infection, is antiseptic,
soothing, healing. Try it
Money Back If It Fails.
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once.

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4
LEVY & WELSCH CO.
Funeral Directors
Phone, 105
Residence. 151
Administrator's Notice.
Letters of administration on the
Estate of Leah Jackson, deceased,
having been granted to me by the
Chancery Court of Claiborne Conn
ty, Miss., an the 7th day of July,
1917, therefore all persons having
claims against the said estate are
hereby required to file the same
with the Clerk of the said Court
and have them probated and al
lowed according to law, within one
year from this date, or the same
will be forever barred.
This 7th day of July, 1917.
Herman Marx,
Administrator.
C. A. FRENCH, Att'y.
I am agent tor the following
periodicals:
Saturday Evening Post}
Ladies' Home Journal
Cosmopolitan
New Orleans Picayune
emphis Commer/cal-Appeal
emphis ews-Sciraitar
Jackson News.
C. M. HOWARD.
New Laundry
Opened June 18th
Opposite Town Hall
Shirt, plain, each_ _ _
Shirt, piain, 3 for __
Collar, each . ..
Cuffs, each.
Ladies' Waist, each.
Palm Beach Coat, each_
Palm Beach Pants, each ..
Linen Pants, each.....
Linen Coat, each™.
We do all kinds of Laundry work, neat
and price reasonable,
io e
25er
2®r
zc
15 to 25c
&A Î.....20C
..2b cr.
25c
25c
'* r*
Qee Woo Laundry
WANTED—Jf you can nse a
bard working 17 year old boy from
now until Oct. ist, phone 31 or
write P. O. box 364. Farm work
pieferred.

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