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San Antonio light and gazette. [volume] (San Antonio, Tex.) 1909-1911, May 19, 1909, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86090238/1909-05-19/ed-1/seq-1/

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PASTEURIZED MILK AND CREAM
Twelr* Wagons to Maka DaUverlaa to
AU Parts of ths City.
Creamery Dairy Co. Phones 871
VOLUME 29, No. 120
THE FROST NATIONAL BANK, MAIN PLAZA, SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS, CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $650,000.00
PUBLICITY COWBOYS HIT THE TRAIL
HENRY H. ROGERS, OIL
MAGNATE, IS DEAD AT
HIS NEW YORK HOME
Passed Away Shortly After
Arising Early This
Morning.
ROSE FROM POVERTY TO AFFLUENCE
Was a Remarkable Man of
Many-Sided Nature.
STARTED IN OIL FIELDS WHEN A BOY
' • A
Associated Presi.
New York, May 19. —H. H. Rogers,
Standard oil capitalist, died at his resi
dence in this city at 7 o'clock this
morning. He arose about 6 and about
half past *> began to feel ill, complain
ing of numbness and nausea. Before
anything could be done he sank and
died- He went on Friday last to his
country place at Fairhaven, Mass., and
returned yesterday.
Mr. Rogers for many years was one
of the most prominent financiers of
. the country. He took a leading part in
all enterprises undertaken by the
Standard oil group of capitalists, was
vice president of the Standard Oil com
pany and was an active spirit in the
organization of the Amalgamated Cop
per company, of which he was presi
dent. up to the time of his death. He
was also interested in a number of
railroads, serving as a member of the
board of directors of the Atchison. To
peka & Santa Fe, Chicago. Milwaukee &
St. Paul, and Union Pacific.
News of his death came as a sur
prise to Wall street. Mr. Rogers was
at the offices of the Standard Oil
company yesterday and apeared to be j
in good spirits. His health has been
failing somewhat for several years and
he has curtailed his financial operations
to some extent on that acount, but con
tinued to perform his duties as vice
president of the Standard Oil com
pany.
Rogers’ heart action was weak and it
is apparent he suffered from a stroke of
apoplexy. This is the second illness of
this nature suffered by Rogers, the first
having occurred in July, 1907. Rogers
has been out of the stock market entire-
Iv for months.
Henry H. Rogers was more than
seventy years old. Just how much
more is not known. The date of his
birth was a secret which he withheld
even from hts intimate friends. He
was born at Fairhaven, Mass His
father was a sea captain, who never
got rich.
Young Rogers had the experience
common to poor boys in a small place.
He earned $3 a week as a barefooted
errand boy for a grocer and there are
still old people in Fairhaven who re
member Henry, the oright lad who
used to deliver groceries at their back
doors.
The traditions of the boyhood and
youth of Robers are hazy. Ju his
1 rime he was too busy working silent
ly, industriously, earnestly to master
every detail of the great business of
which he became the practical head,
to attract public attention. The most
vivid pen picture of him ever given
Is that of Thomas W. Lawson in his
story of “Frenzied Finance.”
Lawson’s Pen Picture of H. H. Rogers.
(Continued on page three.)
LOCAL WEATHER
FFor San Antonio and vicin
ity: Partly cloudy weather to
night and Thursday.
A Minimum temperature for
Istt 24 hours 62, maximum
temperature 82.
11908 1909
4 a. m 71 03
6 a. m 69 63
8 a. m 75' 68
RlO a. m 77 78
12 noon 88 82
Ipm -91 84
SAN ANTONIO LIGHT
AND GAZETTE
JOURNEAY IS
GRANTED MIL
BY HIGH COURT
Amount Is $5OOO and the
Bond Will Be Furnished
Tomorrow Morning,
MANDATE ON THE WAY
TO SAN ANTONIO
E. O. Journeay, alias E. O. Carson,
on the charge of criminal assault, was
granted bail by the court of criminal
appeals at Austin this morning in the
sum of $5OOO.
Judge R. H. Ward, of the counsel for
Journeay, says that the mandate will
reach San Antonio tonight and that
Journeay will furnish bond tomorroy.
The ease of negligent homicide
against Journeay was this morning
transferred from the-Thirty seventh dis
trict court to the county court, where
it will be tried, it being a misdemeanor,
and in the event of a eonvietion the
penalty will be a fine and a county jail
sentence. The bond in this ca.se has not
yet been fixed but it will be some small
amount.
Ready to Give Bond.
“We will be ready to furnish bond
in the two eases tomorrow’’ said Judge
Ward. VWe could furnish bond today
if the mandate was here.”
Journeay some time ago made appli
cation to Judge Dwyer for bail. It
was refused the state producing wit
nesses who testified that Mattie Seott,
the girl in the case, was under 15 years
of age. An appeal was then taken to
the court of criminal appeals.
The case was called for trial in the
Thirty-seventh district court last Mon
day and on application of the defendant
it was continued until the October term
of court. ,
In Jail Nearly Two Months.
Journeay has been in the Bexar coun
ty jail since March 26.
NAVARRO
STREET TO
BE OPENED
$ An agreement has been
{• reached between the sisters of
the order of the Ursuline eon
s' vent and the committee repre
t< senting the eity council, with
I- reference to the priee to be pnid
!> for that portion of land belong
£• Ing to the Ursuline convent, to
>• be used in the extension of Na
;• varro street to connect with Ro-
I- mana street.
h
The agreement was reached yester
day afternoon, when the committee com
posed of Aldermen Lambert. ' Richter
and Braden waited upon those in charge
of the Ursuline convent property. The
committee made its report to the mayor
late in the afternoon.
Mayor Callaghan this morning an
nounced that he did not desire at this
time to make public the priee decided
upon, but that the whole matter would
be fully reported upon by the committee
at the next meeting of the eity council,
which will be next Monday afternoon.
The fact that an agreement, satis
factors' to both sides, has been brought
about will result in the early opening
of this thoroughfare. The committee,
it is said, will recommend that the
council enter into a contract for the
purchase vx the property at the earliest
possible date, in order that active work
on the proposed improvement might be
started.
26 PAGES
Today’s the day that the cowboys of San
Antonio make their raid.
It will lack the spectacular and theatric
features of the raids of the past, but just the
same it will be virile, vigorous and victorious
like the raids of the olden days.
May the cowboys of 1909 shoot holes in
sophistry with logic. May they puncture old
time prejudice with enlightenment ajid may
they rub the moss the wrong way on some of
the shell backs who block the onward move
ment-
Progress is the juggernaut of the moss
back, but it obliterates nim so slowly at first
that he thinks he is deftly holding back the tide.
Then comes the deluge and he is forgotten.
San Antonio is on the threshold, not hesi
tant, not bashful, but pausing between steps,
Mr. Cowboy, get behind with a vigorous shove
and we’ll jump into place in the forward ranks.
Cowboys, as a rule, are not suffocatingly
polite. They do not waste words. They make
each act count when on the range.
Let them use tact when necessary, but
waste no politeness. Go after the strays with
rope and quirt and drive them into the herd.
Get the calves. Brand them with the Prog
ress mark. Rout out the mavericks, lean and
hungry, who know not the good feed of sweet
pastures of advancement. Use spur, lash and
lumps of sugar, but get them in the herd.
Don’t be bashful, don’t be lenient, don’t he
moderate. Turn loose, get the coin. Wake the
town and wake the mossback, too. Then let
the world watch us grow into the finest lot of
thoroughbreds in the great Southwest.
SENATOR GUY
GRILLS THE
SUGAR TRUST
Urges the Material Reduction
of Duty On the Refined
Article.
Associated Press.
Washington, D. C., May 19.—Severe-1
ly arraigning the so-ealled sugar trust j
and urging a material reduction in the
duty on refined sugar, Mr. Clay of
Georgia, today discussed at great
length the various phases of the beet.
and cane sugar industries. He argued j
that the consumer is discrinminated
against in favor of the American Sugar
Refining company and that the sugar
grower gets no benefit of the differen
tial between the duties on raw and re
fined sugar. He critieised most severe-j
ly the manner in which the sugar
schedule of the Payne bill was framed. |
Contending that the American Sugar;
Refining company owns the principal'
refineries in the United States and is al- ■
most without competition in refining (
sugar, Mr. Clay declared that the duty
(Continued on page eight.)
SAN ANTONIO. TEXAS. WEDNESDAY. MAY 19. 1909.
BRANDING DAY
TAFT ASSISTS
IN UNVEILING
OF MONUMENT
Talks On “The Union" During
the Ceremonies Held at
Petersburg, Va.
Petersburg, Va. May 19.—President
Taft is today the guest of both Penn
sylvania and Virginia when he deliver
ed an address at Ft. Mahone following
the unveiling of the monument and
statue of General Hartraft erected in
memory of Pennsylvania soldiers who
fell in the fighting about Petersburg
during the war between the states.
Later he became the guests of the city
at a luncheon and reception.
In addition to the president many
other distinguished visitors participated
in the day’s events including Governor
Stuart of Pennsylvania and Governor
Swanson of Virginia. Members of the
Battlefields Commission of Pennsylva
nia large delegations from army posts
and the post of Confederate Veterans
gathered while at luncheon. "The after
noon speakers include in addition to the
president and the two governors: M.
(Continued on page eight.)
COWBOY BOOSTERS LINED UP BEFORE THE ALAMO
PUNCHERS PARADE STREETS AND ROUNDOP THE DOLLARS FOR SAN
ANTONIO’S DIG BOOST CAMPAIGN. NO ESCAPE FOR
THE CITIZEN WITH COIN IN HIS POCKET.
CALLAGHAN MAY
BE CANDIDATE
FOR GOVERNOR
San Antoni o’s Eight-Time
Mayor Says He May Con
sent to Make the Race.
HE IS BEING URGED
BY INFLUENTIAL FRIENDS
4- Mayor Bryan Callaghan today +
♦ practically confirmed the report +
4- that he would get in the race for ♦
<• the governorship of Texas, but 4-
4- declared that if he did become ♦
♦ a candidate it would not occur 4>
4- until he had served San Antonio 4>
♦ as mayor for the tenth time. He 4 1
♦ is being urged to announce and #
4- a surprise may devskip. 4>
It has been known for some time that
Mayor Callaghan was being urged to
ejter the race for governor, and it is
learned from what may be considered
authentic that he has been approached
by numerous and influential citizens of
both North and South Texas to an
nounce himself a candidate. The mayor,
while appreciative of the honor con
ferred, has up to the present time de
clined to let his name be placed in the
field as a candidate for gubernatorial
honors. Even though he says he will
not consider the matter until after his
tenth term as mayor, there are those
who, professing to know, do not hesi
tate to say that Bryan Callaghan will
be the next goveruor of Texas.
Mayor for Ten Terms.
“I am now about to enter upon my
eighth term as mayor of San Antonio,
and but for a resolve that I have made,
I possibly would enter the race for gov
ernor of Texas,” replied Mayor Calla
ghan this forenoon, when the question
was put direct.
“I have decided to serve this city
as mayor until my tenth term. After
that I may consider whether I shall
occupy the seat in the governor’s
chair.”
While the mayor would make, no di
rect statement, he added, when further
asked, that it was quite probable that
he would be a candidate after the ex
piration of his tenth term as mayor.
Qualified for the Office.
Mayor Callaghan has been mentioned
(Continued on page eight.)
SENTENCED TO 18
MONTHS IN PRISON
Tombstone, Ariz., May 19. —Magon,
Villareal and Rivera. Mexican revolu
tionists, who were convicted in federal
court of violating the neutrality laws
by directing an armed expedition into
Mexico, were sentenced today by Judge
Doan to eighteen months each in the
territorial prison.
26 PAGES
GREAT BRANDING BEE
IS NOW IN FULL SWING
Yip!
Ki yi!
Whoop la! Hooray!
With such yells as these, 16 wild
looking cowboys of the old time type
galloped about San Antonio today.
The were the roundup committee of
the Publicity league and their task was
to round up the dollars for the $25,000
advertising fund that is to make San
Autonio famed.
Eyes opened in wonderment and mild
ly inquisitive pedestrians crowded to
+ 4*4>4*4>4>4>4>« + 4>4>4>4>4>4*4
♦ ♦
4* Some one started the report 4 1
♦ that Governor Campbell had ♦
4 sent a force of rangers to take 4>
4* possession of San Antonio, when 4*
+ the cowboy brigade of solicitors 4
<• for the publicity fund appeared 4 1
4* on the streets this morning. 4>
The rumor was begun in good 4-
4 1 faith and many took it up. Not ♦
4- until well into the day when the 4>
<’ cowboy committee had been seen 4*
4> about the streets for hours conld ♦
♦ many people be made to under 4>
♦ stand the true state of affairs 4>
,4- and to believe that the formida- ♦
4- ble looking crowd were not state 4>
4> rangers come to deslaro military 4-
4> rule in San Antonio. ' 4
♦ ♦
4++4++++ 4 + 4 + W + 4 +
J the curb at sight of the yelling crowd
. of “punchers.” apparently fresh from
. the plains, sweeping by.
Under leadership of Thomas L. Con
roy, foreman of the roundup gang, a
start was made from the Business
Men’s club at 9:30 o’clock and,
screeching like redskins, the bunch
rounded the plaza and drew up in front
of the Alamo.
Here a photograph was taken showing J
J. C. Ryan, with a rope around .
his neck, delivering up a roll of bills
and his watch and other valuables to I
the bunch of bad men at the point of
a dozen guns. This picture will be la
beled “The old way of getting money.” j
Tn front of the St. Anthony hotel I
another halt was made and P. H. Swear-1
ingen, the proprietor, was shown sign
ing a subscription blank while the cow- ;
boys stood about peaceably. This will I
be labeled “The new way of geeting j
money. ’ ’
Not all of the cowboys were make I
believe. At the head of the bunch was |
a gang of six real cow punchers, men I
in the employ of the J. H. Kothmann I
Commission company, specially sent in |
from the Union stock yards and placed I
at the disposal of the Publicity league !
for the day. These men were: W. H. j
Schweers, leader; E. E. Kern, Joe E.
Ripps, Mike Ripps, Henry Fisher and
M. F. Standifer. ■
These fellows were attired in pic- I
turesque regalia, leather chaps, heavy
1 guns, quirts, sombreros and all. The :
[ Ripps brothers, two of their number. I
are famous old time cowbovs of this
vicinity. W. H. Sehweers, the leader. [
was for years a plainsman and carried j ■
two old Colts guns captured 37 years ,
ago from a highwayman by his father, a
pioneer ranchman of Southwest Texas. 1
Business men made up as cowboys I
who joined the lot were: W. A. Bedell,
O. D. H. Pfeuffer. Joe H. Frost. Byron
Swearingen and Harvey L. Page.
Everywhere the cowboys went the
dollars rolled in and before night a com
fortable sum will have been gained to
swell the publicity fund, which is al
ready nearing the promised mark of
GOLDfN >OO BUTTER
Made In a Sanitary Creamery. If your
dealer does not handle It, telephone ua.
Manufactured by
Creamery Dairy Co. Phones 871
PRICE: FIVE CENTS
$25,000. The * 1 stunt ’ ’ aroused much in
terest in the city and nothing more
unique or catchy in the line of a sub
scription campaign has ever been at
tempted here. Good feeling prevailed
all over the city whenever the cowboy
brigade drew up in front of a business
place and stormed it with cries of
“Give up your money for the publicity
campaign,” the response was willing.
Heading the line of cowbovs was an
automobile carrying Thomas L. Conroy,
chairman of the Publicity league, and
a number of directors of the Business
Men’s club.
Today’s soliciting work has been giv
en a whirlwind aspect, for in addition
to the cow punchers* brigade, a number
of regular committees were put at work.
They are as follows:
Main plaza and Dolorosa street: A.
B. Stephens.
Houston street east: Byron Swear,
ingen. J. F. Garland, W. D. Syers, IT.
O, Skinner, Robert Clarke and' Ernest
Reutze).
Alamo plaza: W. T. Pancoast, W. B.
Kelly. Park Longworth.
Insurance agents: W. L. Stiles.
Market street: H. C. Flynt, H. P.
' Street, F. F. Perkins.
Mioore building: J. H. Savage, Smith,
A G. Greiner.
Hicks building: Ross Boles, George
W. Dietz, G. D. Robbins.
Besides these localities 16 other de
tailed route lists have been prepared
by the Publicity league for which com
mittees will be chosen later during the
week and in which the campaign will
be thoroughly pushed.
BOOSTERS HELD
WAR DANCE
LAST NIGHT
The booster forces of San Antonio
were busy last night and the walls of
the auditorium of the Business Men 'a
elub were made to echo with the gospel
4- “I almost believe that this
4 one day’s work will see the ad
❖ vertising fund of $35,000 com
-- pleted. It is amazing the way
4 the city bad rallied in support
'4- of this movement.
I - “The people are not hanging
! 4 back, but are coming forward
1 4 with liberal subscriptions at
'4* every turn. Up to the present
4- time the sources from which
;4- funds may be expected have
4 been little more than touched
4 and scores of lais in ess interests
4' have not yet been approached.
4 lam confident that if the mark
4- had been set at $40,000 or even
4 $50,01)0 it could have been raised.
4 San Antonio is thoroughly woke
4- up. Its people are roused to
4* public movements. This cam
4 paign gives us startling proof
4- of that.”—Thomas L. Conroy,
4> Chairman Publicity League.
of Beautiful San Antonio at the second
general meeting of the members of the
Publicity League.
A constitution and by-laws wero
adopted, separating the Public League
from the Business Men's club, and pro
viding that its aims and objects shall
be to advertise at alb times the business
(Continued on page two.)

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