OCR Interpretation


San Antonio light and gazette. [volume] (San Antonio, Tex.) 1909-1911, June 06, 1909, Image 19

Image and text provided by University of North Texas; Denton, TX

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86090238/1909-06-06/ed-1/seq-19/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 19

mssip
FDREIGN CARS
FOR COBE RACE
The Latest Entrant Is of French
Make and to Compete In
the Preliminary Event,
Chicago, 111,, June s.—One more
foreign car, one of French construc
tion this time, has been entered for
the road racing carnival of the Chi
cago Automobile club over the Crown
Point-Lowell circuit June 18 and 19,
adding still more international color
to the “western Vanderbilt.” It is
a candidate for honors in the Indiana
trophy race, the light car event that
will be the curtain raiser to the main
contest, the Cobe cup, and it is the
first foreign car to be named for the
light car race.
Arthur W. Greiner of Chicago, an
emateur, yesterday telegraphed an en
try from New York of a twenty-thirty
horsepower Renault for the. Indiana
trophy race, while in the mail yester
day afternoon by General Executive
Trogo was a letter from F. J. Wagner,
eastern representative, who stated that
it was the intention of Paul Lacroix,
importer of the Renault, to back up
.the Greiner entry with a second Re
nault, which will be driven by Baelo,
one of the most prominent road racing
pilots in the country.
Greiner is an enthusiast who has
made more than a local reputation. At
the Algonquin hill-climb of the Chi
cago Motor elub last summer he cap
tured the amateur championships in a
Chalmers-Detroit, while on the south
ern circuit last month he drove a
Thomas seventy horsepower racer in
which he smashed the five-mile record
Today’s Best Guess
SUNDAY,
UNIVERSAL LANGUAGE FOR AUTOISTS
Do you own a gasoline surrey! If
so, the accompanying illustration will
interest you. Maybe it will, whether
or no you own a chug chug cart. The .
International League of Automobile
clubs has declared for universal lan
guage of the highway, and the signs
posted in every country where auto-
in the track meet at Birmingham, Ala.
General Executive Trogo drove to
Crown Point yesterday in his Apper
son Jack Rabbit for the purpose of
inspecting the work done on the course.
He found nearly four mMes of the
eastern leg completed and he tried it
out. He had the Jack Rabit up to
sixty miles an hour on this stretch and
he reports there wasn’t a sign of dust
nor w-ere any loose stones thrown up
—in fact the highway was just like a
city boulevard. The road makers are
also busy on the west leg and expect
to reach Lowell tonight.
The sale of seats for the grand stand
is reported to be improving every day,
the daily receipts this week averaging
better than $5OO a day. Yesterday the
Chicago Automobile club placed tick
ets on sale at A. G. Spalding & Bros.,
in addition to the office that has been
opeaed at the club and also at Mr.
Trego’s beadquarters, 1240 Michigan
avenue.
Waiter: You’ll find our roast goose,
very satisfying, sir.
Regular Patron: I don’t doubt it,
William. The last roast goose I tried
here will satisfy me, I think, for the
next ten years. Bring me some broiled
ham, William. —Chicago Tribune.
Take
a
Street
Car ।
Ride.
Extra
Service
to
ONE WANT SUPPLIED.
mobiljsts drive, will impart informa
tion, no matter what language the
motorist may, speak. The pictured
woods tell instantly that high hills,
sharp turns, railways or cross roads
are beyond, permitting the driver to fix
the speed of his ifiachine to the con
ditions he is to encounter.
CADILLAC UNDERTAKES
UNPRECEDENTED TRIP
Across the pathless Australian des
erts and prniries from Sydney, at the
southeastern point of the continent, to
Carpentaria, on the shore of Carpen
taria Bay, at the north—this is the
unprecedented trip now being under
taken by a Cadillac Thirty car.
This car is traversing country wild
and desolate, through which no other
automobile has ever attempted to
force its way. The distance between
the two points, as the crow flies, is
about 1300 miles. Necessarily, the car
will travel many more miles than that
because of the fact that n<> route has
been laid out for it and much of the
time it will be traversing roadless
wastes. R. W. Sandford of Sydney is
making the trip.
GUARDING HIS REPUTATION.
“Why do you always go out onto the
balcony when T begin to sing! Can't I
you bear to listen to met” asked a
lady.
“It isn't that, but I don’t want the
neighbors to take me for a wife-beat i
er. ’ ’ —Exchange.
West End Lake
Electric Park
Hot Wells
Alamo Heights
Beacon Hill
South Heights
and
f
South Flores
SAN-ANTONIO light and gazette
BIKERS HOPE TO CATCH WESTON
ERE HE REACHES PACIFIC COAST
Leaving New York May 15, Walter
Wylie and E. Higgins are pedaling
their way westward, spurred on by de
si: e to overtake EdwaJ-d Payson Wes
ton, now walking through Colorado.
PATHFINDER
MET WESTON
One of the pleasant incidents of the
Glidden pathfinding trip which was
completed last week, was the meeting
of the veteran walker, Edward Payson
Weston, near Buffalo Park, Colorado.
“It was a pathetic sight—or rather
so it appealed to us,’’ says Meinzin
ger, driver of the EM-F Pathfinder
car, “to see the lone old man coming
across the prairie. I saw him at Sche
nectady just after he started on his
long walk across the continent, and I
could not but notice the change in his
appearance. Still, he looked able to
complete the trip in good condition.
We stopped the car, got out and talk
ed with him a few minutes. Ho seem
ed a bundle of nerves. Couldn't stand
still for a minute, but kept shifting
from one foot to the other as he
talked.
“When he started from New York
an automobile agreed to accompany
him but at Chicago, dissatisfied with
the amount of “publicity’’ the car
received, it deserted him, and he was
The aged pedestrian has covered
half of his long walk to San Francis
, co and his average of 43 miles a day
! promises to take him to his destination
‘ within the specified time of 100 days.
making his way across the plains with
out even a human companion. Still
he was cheerful and hopeful and josh
ed us about his superior ability to
ford swollen creeks and to skip over
mudholes.
“At his request we telephoned from
the little town we were bound for, to
a farm house a few miles back which
Weston hoped to make by noon, ask
ing them to prepare two eggs, beaten
up with sugar. These he told us would
constitute his only repast till night.’’
Weston left South Bend, Ind., one
day behind the Pathfinder. As he had
taken the direct route west and the
E-M-F Pathfinder had gone by way of
Minneapolis to Denver and was on the
return leg of the course, the car had
gone 1800 miles farther in the inter
vening 29 days than the man on foot.
But the men in the machine could not
but feel the walker had made the
greatest record after all. And he had
so little to encourage him on the weary
way —just an ambition to prove to him
self and to the world that he was still
young in spite of his more than three
score and ten years.
BUICK FORCE
FIRST IN CAMP
Lewis Strang, Louis Chevrolet, Geo.
। DeWitt and Bobby Burman, compos-
Jing the Buick team drivers, were the
; first to reach the Cobe trophy course
and establish a training camp. There
are 15 in the racing party. The camp
I will be under the personal supervision
of W. J. Mead of the Buick company
and is one of the most complete ever
established for a racing event.
A hotel at Crown Point, Ind., hsus
I been chartered and a Pullman sleeper,
। with dining arrangements, will be
used for the mechanical force, being
parked adjoining the huge garage car
which the Buick team uses for trav
I eling. The garage car is fitted up to
| carry eight automobiles and is equip
! ped with a small factory of extra
parts, tires, etc. A miniature machine
shop, a lathe, drill press and black
smith’s forge and anvil are located in
one end.
For the care of the drivers who will
be put through a rigid course of train
ing and practice each day, an expert
enced physical culture expert has been i
engaged and the drivers will be as !
well cared for after a long drive as is |
customary in conditioning athletes.
The Cobe race is at a distance of 1
over 400 miles and Mr. Mead figures I
that the physical condition of the men
at the steering wheels will count for |
as much as anything else.
A TEMPERANCE TALE.
The new and very stringent prohibi- 1
tory law which goes into effect in Kan
sas has revived an old story on the sub
ject. A stranger went into a Kansas !
drug store and asked for some whiskey. ’
“I can’t sell you any whiskey,” said I
the druggist.
“But I’m sick,” persisted the
stranger.
“That won’t help any.” replied the I
druggist “It don’t make any differ-J
ence, I oan't sell you any whiskey for J
being sick.”
“Well, what can you sell it to me
for?” asked the stranger.
“The only thing we can sell whiskey
for in this town,” said the druggist,
“is for snake bites. Hold up now,
don’t ask me where to get bitten. No
use. There is only one snake in town, I
and he is engaged for three weeks 1
ahead.” —Kansas City Journal. .
SOUTHERN CHIVALRY.
“What os the reason,” asked the |
traveler from the north, “that the
trains down in this part of the country
are always behind time? I have never
seen one yet that ran according to its
schedule. ’ ’
“That, suh,” replied the dignified i
Georgian, “is a mattah that is easily!
explained. It is all due to southern I
chivalry, suh.”
“Southern chivalry! Where does I
that come in ”
“You see, suh, the trains are always ।
late in this country because they wait [
for the ladies, God bless them!”
Many of our citizens are drifting to
wards Bright’s disease by neglecting j
symptoms of kidney and bladder trou
ble which Foley’s Kidney Remedy will
quickly eure. —Bexar Drug Co.
“CAD” SEA y
OHI BEACH ■
EXCURSION I
50 I
X • Round Trip I
to ra
CORPUS CHRISTI I
ROCKPORT or E
ARANSAS PASS |
DOWN SATURDAY NIGHT K
Leave “SAP” Depot 11:30 p. m.
June 12th. IB
BACK SUNDAY NIGHT £,5
June 13 th. ES
Tourist Sleepers $l.OO Par Berth TO
See SPRINGALL, Alamo Plaza. £7
♦ RAILROAD TIME TABLE ♦
* ♦
❖4-++++++++ + + 4. + + + + +
I- k G. ■. Arrive.
No. 3—From the North 10-20 p m
No. s—From the North 6:45 s m
No. 7—Local from Hearne 10:10 a ■
No. 9—Local from Taylor 6:lSp m.
No. 4 —From Mexico 1:20 pm
No. 12—Local from Laredo (mxd) 6:00 a'm.
Depart
No. 4—For the North 1:25 p m
No. 6—For the North 7:45 o'm
No. B—Local8 —Local for Hearne 7:30a m
No. 10—Express Spec’l for Taylor 4:00 a m
No. s—For Mexico 7:00 s. nu
No. 11—Local for Laredo (mixed) 9:00 p.m.
8. A. & A. p. Arrive.
No. I—From1 —From Houston and Coast. 7:20 p.m
No. 3—From Houston and Coast. 7:00 a. m
No. s—From5 —From Coast Towns 1:35 p. m
No. 46—From Kerrville (ex. Sun.) 9:40 a. m'
No. 44—From Kerrville (Sun only) 3:oop'm.
No. 44 —From Kerrville (ex. Suri.) 6:40 p.m'
Depart.
No. 2 —For Houston and Coast.. 8:45 am
No. 4—For Houston and Coast.. 9:10 p" m
No. 6 —For Coast Towns 2:15
No. 45—For Kerrville ex. Sun.). 4:30 p' m.
No. 43—For Kerrville (Sun. only) 8:30 a.m.
No. 43—For Kerrville (ex. Suu.). 7:25 a.m.
G., H. k S. A. (Main Line).
Arrive.
No. 9 —From the Eaet 7:35 a. m
No. 7 —From the East 6 00 p.m'
No. 10—From El Paso and West.. 7:30 £ nri
Depart.
No. 9—For El Paso and Went... 9:00a u.
No. 10—For the East.; 10:30 p.m'
No. 8- For the East 11:00 a. m.
G., H. k 8. A. (Victoria Division).
Arrive.
No. 302 —Cuero, Victoria, ate 7:30 p.m.
Depart.
No. 301—Cuero, Victoria, etc.. .8:00 a. m.
M.. K. k T. (Union Station).
Arrive*
No. 235—From the North 7:30 a.m.
©
/ nat pass ■ '
~ it;, c
X THE A-Y-P EXPOS
© why ntw'r ymi
Landa's Park
Every Sunday
Trains Leave 7:30 a. m., 2 p. m.
via Short, Quick Time.
I. & G. N.
Ample Equipment. Quickest Route.
Both Trains Go Into the Park
Only One Night To Memphis
Chair Cars. Sleepers. Diners.
J. M. DALEY, P. T. A. City Oifice: 101 E. Houston
g “SUNSET ROUTE”
e $79.00 NEW YORK A RETURN, Dlvtm Route, Steamer Ona way
00 $93.00 NEW YORK A RETURN. Dlvarta Route, Staamor One Way
Also St. Lawrence Biver, Lake Champlain, Hudson River.
$5O 00. $60.00 and $70.00 SAN FRANCISCO ANO RETURN
n Through Standard Sleeper to Chicago Daily
” Steamship Tickets to and from Europe
CO TICKET OFFICE 507 EAST HOUSTON STREET
JUNE 6, 1969.
A
Through Sleeper
to St. Louis
with
Observation
Dining
Car,
Harvey Service,
and one of those
low, round-trip
tickets to the sea
shore makes an
ideal trip
I
FRISCOI
H. W. Pinnick, T. P. A.
San Antonio
No. 243—From the North 9:15 p. nu
No. 241 —From Houston and Gal.. 6 .30 anu
Departs.
No. 28For th® North a 9:00 p. nu
No. 244—For the North 7:30 a. «.
No. 242—For Houston and Gal. . .10:15 p. du
19

xml | txt