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San Antonio light and gazette. [volume] (San Antonio, Tex.) 1909-1911, June 09, 1909, Image 2

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'WEDNESDAY,
Summer Suits: $lO to $35
WE ARE showing an exceptionally
attractive line of two-piece suits for
these hot days.
The best for work. Good for dress-up.
We have them for all kinds of wear, tropical
worsteds, velour finished cassimeres, plain and fancy
serges. All new and stylish.
If you try a Wolfson suit once you’ll never
wear any other kind. Step in and try one on.
New Summer Neckwear: 50c
Four-in-hands that are altogether new. The finest of silks
in rich stripe effects: also light grounds with spots and
detached figures. The color treatment includes green,
blue, drab, heliotrope, brown and gray. They are all
the kind that particular men will be interested in seeing. M
Men's Belts From 50c up to $1.50 !
Suede, seal, plain and patejit leathers-black, tan and
green. Buckles of the newest shapes, pearl, gilt and LL,
nickel Every price from 5Cc to $1.50 each.
eorr*GMT by a. a. mirscmbaum a co..
SAinWniFSON ddy goods co\
TWENTY MEN
HURLED INTO
THE FLAMES
Associated Press.
Halifax, N. S„ .Tune 9.—Twenty men
were hurled into a burning building
while fighting a fire which broke out I
this afternoon in the plant of the Nova (
Scotia Furnishing company. The roof
of one of the buildings on which the [
men were standing suddenly collapsed.
VACATION
FOR MA YOR
ON AUGUST 1
Mayer is e-aterpiatsg
Taking h.’S Fcmmwr vara rm abeet Arg
1. It is prrhatde he will call upon
the council within the aexi two or
three weeks to grant him a leave of
aiwenne for one monta.
“I want to get away from the eity
for ai>out a month and tak« a rest.”
•aid the mayor this morning. “I have
Wen so busy for the last six months
that I believe a trip to the coast, or
•till further down and right in the
g- f of Mexico, where I could go about
like a wild man. would do me good.
“J will ask the council for a leave
of absence effective Aug. 1 ( or it may
be sooner. The feeling to be away and
out in the country is upon me and I
don t know just bow long I ean stay
it off, before I must answer the call.”
During the mayor's absence, William
I. Biehter, who has just been re-eleet
ed mayor pro tem, will preside at the
head of the municipal government.
Mayor < allaghan spent last summer ou
the eoast for a month and returned in
the best of health and spirits.
SETS NEW RECORD
FOR BACK TAXES
The collection of back taxes bv
Thad Smith, eity back tax collector,
for the month of May, amounting to
$10,07u.f1", establishes a new record in
this department. This is bv far the
largest amount ever collected for one
month, the average collection per
month being between three and four
thousand dollars.
The sum collected is represented by
the issuance of 418 separate receipts
by Collector Smith. The sending out of
Communications notifying delinquents
of back taxes due materially swelled
the total collection. The funds received
represent taxes due as far back as 1877
and up to the year 1907.
CONFEDERATE VETERAN
TAKES DOSE OF OPIUM
Associated Press.
Mobile, Ala., June 9.—Thomas Dunn,
aged 71 years, a Confederate veteran’
died last night at his home in Chrieh
ton, a suburb of this eity from the ef
fects of a dose of opium. He was well
known in Mississippi, Louisiana and
Alabama.
DENIES THAT HE
SENT THE LETTERS
Special Dlsoatch.
Dallas. Tex., June 9.—Fred Fleming
continued his testimony in the bank
officials trial today. He denied respon
sibility for sending letters, saying the
defunct bank and trust company was
solvent just prior to its failure.
School Board Committee Meetings.—
The building and the finance commit
tees of the school board will meet
tonight to consider estimates on the
building of the necessary additions to
the public schools.
NEWS FROM ALL OVER TEXAS
WHEAT CROP MEANS
MILLIONS FOR DENTON
Special Dispatch.
Denton, Tex., June 9. —A dollar and
a half per bushed was the posted price
for wheat on the Denton market today’.
The yield and quality is exceeding ex
pectations and it is estimated the crop
will bring $1,000,000 to Denton county
farmers.
WHEAT MARKETED
AT $1.30 A BUSHEL
Special Dispatch.
Wichita Falls. Tex, June 9.—The
first of this season's wheat reached the
market here this morning when seven
hundred bushels, weighing sixty pounds
per bushel, was brought in. selling at
a dollar thirty. Threshing in Wichita
eounty is now generally under way.
ARE INVESTIGATING
AUSTIN PRIZE FIGHT
Spee.a' Dispstea
Austin. Tex., June 9.—The grand jury
here today is investigating the recent
WAHRMUND
IS GIVEN A
HEAVY FINE
Eugene Wahrmund, who white a
member of the police force, became in
volved in an affray with a number of
prominent citizens and society leaders
at the International & Great Northern
depot last Sunday night, pleaded guilty
in Justice Fisk's court this afternoon
to a charge of using abusive language
and was fined $25 and costs, aggregat
ing $42.50.
The charge against Wahrmund was
made by Assistant District Attorney
C. C. Cresson. Wahrmund resigned from
the force Monday.
NINE HURT IN WRECK
NEAR SHREVEPORT
Special Dispatch.
Shreveport, La„ June 9.—A regular
freight and a work train collided at a
sharp curve over the trestle at Wal
lace Lake south of Shreveport on the
Kansas City’ Southern this afternoon,
injuring Assistant Foreman Will Hol
land, the fireman, brakeman and six
laborers on the work train. Both loco
motives were demolished. It is said the
freight disregarded orders to wait.
H. CLAY PIERCE
GOING TO EUROPE
Associated Prats.
Nashville. Tenn.. June 9.—H. Clay’
Pierce, Standard Oil magnate and one
of the principal owners of the Tennes
see Central railroad, is here to look
over the property. Pierce’s resignation
as chairman of the board of directors
was accepted. Pierce’s health is not
good and he- will soon go to Europe
for an indefinite stav.
TWO ARRESTS IN
TENNESSEE CRIME
Associated Press.
Lexington, June 9.—Elisha Smith
and Levi Johnson, who were arrested
here on a charge of shooting former
Marshal Ed Callahan, were lodged in
jail at Jackson this morning. It is re
.ported that members of. the feud fac
tion are arriving in Jackson and troops
may be asked to prevent a clash. A
special grand jury will be empaneled
to investigate the charges against the
three men now under arrest. The
blood hounds have been withdrawn,
and no more arrests are expected in
the Callahan shoaUag
SAN ANTONIO LIGHT AND GAZETTE
prize fight which resulted in the death
of . Victor Lyons. I The city commission ,
is also making an investigation to de
termine the responsibility of the police
department in the matter.
TRAINMEN REPORT
. OKLAHOMA STORM
Special Dispatch.
Fort Worth, Tex., June 9.—lt is re
ported at the Rock Island offices here
that buildings were unroofed, window
lights smashed, ears blown from the
track and other damage done in a se
vere wind and hail storm at Sayre, I
Okla., last night.
ALLEGED SWINDLER
DIES IN COUNTY JAIL
Special Dispatch.
• Fort Worth. Tex., June 9.—R. B.
Parker, aged 38 years, charged with
I swindling, died in the connty jail here
this morning from peritonitis. He was
a member of a prominent McKinney
family and was alleged to have de
frauded a Fort Worth bank of a large
sum through bogus checks. He was
wanted also at El Pa«o, Beaumont, San
Antonio and Hondo on similar charges
DIN GLEY RATE
ON WOOL WASTE
IS ADOPTED
Associated Press.
Washington, June 9. —By a vote of
40 to 30 the senate today adopted the
finance committee’s report restoring
the Dingley rate of 30 cents per pound
on wool top waste and other waste.
The house rate was 20 cents. Progres
sive republicans generally voted with
the democrats against the increase.
FILTH AND FLIES
AT SHAWNEE, OKLA.
Special Dispatch.
Muskogee, Okla., June 9. —State
Sanitary Inspector Emery of Shawnee
today closed one bakery and made a
report on sanitary conditions which he
describes as ‘‘frightful, restaurants
reeking with filth and flies, city and
county jails in a deplorable sanitary’
condition. A small stream where re
fuse is dumped is polluting north Mus
kogee. ’ ’
TALKS AGAINST A
DUTY Ofl WOOD PULP
> " 1
Associated Press.
Washington. June 9.—John Norris,
chairman of the committee on paper
of the American Newspaper Publish
ers’ association, was heard today by
the senate committee of finance in sup
port of free wood pulp and a lower
duty on print paper. He spoke for
nearly an hour, the burden of his ar
gument being that paper can be pro
duced as cheaply by American mills as
by Canadian mills. No action was
taken bv the committee.
CAPTAIN COLEMAN
DIES AT MONTGOMERY
Associated Press.
Montgomery, Ala.. June 9.—Captain
Frank Coleman of the United States
land office here, died today after a
short illness. He was a scout under
General Forest and an editor in Hunts
ville after the war.
HEATHER WimrHE
MOTOR BOAT RACE
Hamilton, Bermuda, June 9.—The
motor boat ‘‘Heather,” owned by
Richmond Levering, crossed the finish
line in the race from New York at
10:13 a. m. today. She is the first of
the four boats to finish.
SHIP STOLEN
LACE IN TRUNKS
Goods Valued in Neighborhood
of $2OOO Passes Through
City From Houston.
Two large trunks containing ap
proximately $2OOO worth of fine lace
and bolts of the finest ladies,’ dress
fabrics, believed to have been stolen
from the Alk.emeyer dry goods store
of Houston, Texas, according to the
local officers, passed through San An
tonio two days ago. It is thought
the destination was Hot Springs, Ark.
According to report received here
the Alkemeyer store was burglarized
on the night of June 6. The haul con
sisted of four very large trunks filled
with the finest of goods. The bur
glary of the place is said to have been
daring. While policemen and private
watchmen patrolled the sidewalks be
low. burglars on the roofs of the
houses ransacked the large department
store at will, only such arti
cles as were of great value and easily
marketed.
Word was received here by the local
police officials, but it seems the
trunks had been cheeked through and
had loft prior to the receipt of the
message. It is probable both may yet
be intercepted before the destination,
which is believed to be Hot Springs,
Ark., is reached.
DRUMMER
DROPS DEAD
Special Dispatch.
Waco. Tex., June 9.—A telegram
from Georgetown states that Meyer
Efron, a drummer for Sanger Bros, of
Waco, but living at Bartlett, dropped
dead at Georgetown today while wait
ing on a customer. He leaves a widow
and six children. He was 35 years old.
MORTUARY
Mrs. Mary Walther.
Mrs. Mary Walther, aged 50 years,
wife of Alvin Walther, died* at 7
o'clock last night at her home, 1331
Burnet street. She was born at Cas
troville and had been a resident of San
Antonio eighteen years. Surviving her
are her husband and seven children,
five sone. Max of Seattle, Wash.., Ar
thur, Fritz. Carl and Henry of San An
tonio. and two daughters. Mrs. Alma
Sehulz and Miss Helen Walther, of San
Antonio.
The funeral will be held at 5 o'clock
this afternoon from tne residence.
Mrs. Ben Williams.
Mrs. B*n Williams, aged 28 years,
who came to the eity about a month
ago from Mount Cairn, died yesterday
at 209 Leal street of pulmonary trouble.
Her husband. Ben Williams, and two
children, survive her. The fnneral was
held at 10 o’clock this morning.
+++++ * + + +
♦ +
+ GIBLS WITH FALSE HAIR +
♦ ARE NOT BEAUTIFUL. +
+ ♦
+++ + + +
PAULINE FREDERICK.
‘‘A woman wouldn’t have to wear
so much false hair if she only took care
of her own hair,” says Pauline Freder
ick, whose own hair is so wondrous that
she ought to know whereof she speaks.
‘‘A woman can’t be really and truly
beautiful when she wears hair that is
not her own. It is awfully hard to take
proper care of your hair, but it will
pay a hundredfold. There’s a tremen
dous satisfaction in knowing that your
nair is your own.”
SIX-YEAR FIGHT OVER
BURIAL OF A FOOT
♦ +
♦ Jeffersonville, Ind., June +
•b The Pennsylvania railroad has ♦
❖ just settled a claim for burying ♦
+ a man’s foot, which had been ❖
♦ pending nearly six years. The ♦
+ foot was that of John M. Price, ♦
+ who is now agent for the road +
♦ at Vernon, and whose right +
4- foot was accidentallv cut off at ♦
* Shelbyville on Oct.’ 26. 1903. +
♦ The foot was turned over to +
< Robert Stewart, an undertaker, ♦
<• for burial, but he evidently ♦
❖ used a more handsome casket ♦
♦ than the road had counted on, +
♦ for he sent in a bill for $l2. The <•
company thought $6 ought to be +
❖ enough for burying one foot, +
4- and n few days ago Stewart ♦
' ♦ agreed to take $6. ❖
I * ♦
NEGRO 1 MENACE
TO THE WHITES
Ex-Governor Vardaman of Mis
sissippi, Here Today, Makes
That Declaration.
“It ought to be made as much a
crime to sell whiskey or cocaine to a
negro as it is to sell it to an Indian,”
declared Ex-Gov. James K. Vardaman
of Mississippi when seen at the Menger
hotel this morning.
“Under, the influence of either a
negro is more dangerous than a wild
animal from the jungles of Africa,”
EX-GOV. JAS. VARDAMAN.
added Mr. Vardaman, in his tense, en
gaging manner.
Of pleasing personality, urbane and
polished, Governor Vardaman gives the
impression of high-strung sensibility,
which is intense’and magnetic. Speak
ing in generalities, he touched lightly
on the questions of prohibition and of
the menace of the negro in a manner
that gave the impression of a smoul
dering volcano ready to burst into erup
-1 tion.
“Personally. I am in favor of pro
hibition. We have prohibition in Mis
sissippi and it has worked admirably.
All but six counties were dry under tho
local option laws before the last legis
lature passed the state wide prohibition
law This law was all the more impor
tant fox M oa aeronst of ‘he negro
popnlatMH wlhiefc tn Mir* districts out
numbers tae wait*. It was in the white
evanties that prohibition came first.
Yes, the law is fairly well enforced; no
law is thoroughly enforced. course
there are some scattered blind tigers,
but these few and scattered as they
। arc, are infinitely better both for th«
i white and negro than the open saloon.
A Native of Texas.
“Texas is a great country,” said
.Governor Vardaman. “The more I see
of it the more I am impressed with its
। vastness and its possibilities, and I am
proud to say that I am a native Texan.
(I was born near Edna in 1861, and my
; father enlisted in the Confederate army
from Texas. We moved to Mississippi
in 1868. This is a great climate. It is
worth more per acre than the most val
uable land. I should think that it was
worth $5OO per acre any day.
The Great White Plague.
“You have many visitors here!”
queried the governor earnestly; “health
seekers? Ah, that is another phase of
the race problem —the great white
i plague. This is mowing down thous
ands of negroes each year. In later
years they are becoming very amicep
tible to the disease and the cabins of
I the cooks and washerwomen and conch
men are breeding places for the germs.
In fact, the negro on every hand is a
menace to the w’hite.
“What do I regard as the impending
crisis in the race problem! Well, come
tonight, and I will tell you all about
it, as I see it.”
Since his retirement from the office
of governor, Mr. Vardaman has been
•the editor of a political paper called
I the Issue, published at Jackson, Miss.
Governor Vardaman will speak to
night at the Grand Opera house on the
“Race Problem: the Impending Crisis.
RAILROAD NEWS
United effort should secure the next
National Dry Farming congress for San
Antonio, declares H. P. Atwater, indus
trial agent of the Southern Pacific, with
headquarters at Houston, who is in the
citytoday.
“In this connection I want to call
attention to the fact that the first dry
farming convention ever held in Texas
will take place September 1 and 2 at
Alpine,” said Mr. Atwater. “It is a
state convention and should prove of
much value to this locality.”
Mr. Atwater was a caller today at the
Business Men’s club and volunteered
his assistance in San Antonio’s effort
to secure the National Dry Farming
congress. >
“Among the Rockies,” a complete
guide to the principal attractions in
the Rocky Mountains is seen from the
train on the lines of the Denver & Rio
Grande system, is an attractive little
booklet now being distributed by the
passenger department of that company.
Malaria Causes Loss of Appetite.
I I’he Old Standard GROVE’S TASTFz
; LESS CHILL TONIC, drives out ma
j larla and builds up the system. For
; grown people and Children Wc.
YOU HAVE WONOEREO
HOW WE can make tailor-made clothes so
low in price — and still maintain excellent
quality of material and workmanship. The
reason is, we manufacture ohr own materials,
maintain stores throughout the United States,
and make up the garments in our several shops.
They’re made to your specifications and re
quirements. You’ll find a wide range of the
latest shades and patterns, in the finest woolens.
Come in and see the goods and you’ll be convinced,
that we are offering excellent garments at.
NO MORE ।
AND THEY’RE UNION MADE
EiasßtnN
SmmS
221 E. Houston St. T. A. Binford, Mgr.
LATE
CITY NEWS
Detective Newnam Improving—City
Detective Frank Newnam, who has
been ill for the last few days, suffering
from a severe attack of acute indiges
tion, was Reported as much_improved
today. Detective Newnam was taken
suddenly ill while on duty Saturday
night at police headquarters.
Wine and Whiskey Stolen—Two
Mexicans giving their names as Jesus
Trejos and Ernesto Solis were placed
under arrest last night by Patrolman
Vidal and lodged in the city jail on
charges of theft under the value of $5O.
ft is alleged they stole several bottles
of wine and a few flasks of whiskey
from a west side saloon last night. Both
were transferred to the county authori
ties this afternoon.
Horse Runa Away.—A horse attach
ed to a buggy driven by L. W. Bach
man became frightened yesterday
while at th* corner of East Commerce
and LaSalle streets and ran away. The
horse continued its run until it reached
the corner of South Flores and Aransas
streets, where it slipped and fell. It
was caught and held by the police until
called for by the owner. No damage
was done except to the buggy to which
it was hitched.
33 cents a day after the first eash
payment is made will enable you to
become an owner of a West Gardendale
Suburban farm.
DAHLGREN, BENSON & WELCH.
Grand Opera House Bldg.
NOTICE TO TAX PAYERS.
Mayor’s Office, June 5, 1909.
In aecordanee with the ordinances
of the city of San Antonio, notice is
hereby given to every person, firm, part
nership or corporation owning or con
trolling property within the limits of
the city of San Antonio, Texas, on the
first day of June, 1909, liable to taxa
tion, that the books of the City Assess
or are now open for rendition of prop
erty for taxation, and all said, parties
are requested to render their property
for taxation by said city on or before
the first day of September, 1909.
' BRYAN CALLAGHAN,
Attest: Mayor.
FRED FRIES, City Clerk.
NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION.
Notice is hereby given that the co
partnership heretofore existing between
E. M. Hitzfelder and L. F. Ammann,
under the firm name of Hitzfelder &
Ammann, and doing business at No.
620 Perez street, in the city of San
Antonio. Texas, has been this day dis
solved by mutual consent. L. F. Am
mann has retired from said firm and
business, and E. M. Hitzfelder will
continue the business at the same place.
Dated at San Antonio, Texas, this
May J. 1909.
EDWARD M. HITZFELDER.
L. F. AMMANN
* —»
Dr. McMullen of Victoria is among
the arrivals at the Elite.
A—TOO LATE TO CLASSIFY
Don’t You Want a Home?
I have attractive properties In all the
good locations in the eity. from $1250 to
$l2 000 Easv terms. Let me tell you
about them. W. D. flyers. owner. 427 Na
vart x~:et.
A HOME complete foe less than you can
build it. ssoo down, balance monthly
W. D. Syers. owner. 427 Navarro street
A HOME ready for you to move into;
gas. light*, etc., for slso*cash, balance
like rent. W. D. flyers, owner, both
phonea
JUNE 9. 1909.
COTTON
HIGHER
OFFICE OF THE LIGHT AND GA
ZETTE, San Antonio. Texas. June 8.->
There was good buying in spots in ths
markets during the morning and thia,
coupled with the fact that July longs
have mostly closed out their stocks,
gradually forced \he price from the low
point, at which it opened, to 6 to 10
points up from yesterday's close.
Another bull factor were reports to tha
effect that weather conditions were crit
ical. more rain being indicated in many
places which has already had too much.
NF.W YOBS.
Tester-
Open High Low Close day
July 10.65 10 81 10.63 10.77-79 10.73
Oct 10.62 10.76 10.61 10.72 73 10.71
Barely steady.
HEW ORLEANS
Teeter-
Open High Low Close day
July 10«6 H.OO 10.83 10.94
Oct 10.65 10.76 10.64 10.70
LIVERPOOL
Tester
f Open High Ixiw Close day
July-Aug. 5.67 5.69 '5.65 5.69 6.7014
Oct.-Nov. 5.61 *5.65 5.60 5.64 6 6516
•»•+♦ + + + ♦♦ + + ♦♦*♦♦♦♦
* X
♦ *
* CHICAGO GRAIN MARKET *
♦ ♦
Wheat — Open High Low Close
July 118 H 11956 11816 11*14
Sept 11056 11<H4 110% H»%
C °Juiy 72% 78 ’2 73%
Sept «»% 20% 6916 70%
Outs-—•
July 53ty 53%
Sept 44*4 44*4
♦ *
* LEADING SPOT MARKETS ♦
Today Tes’dsy Ssiee
Liverpool, easier .... 5.75 5.81 6000
New York, quiet... .11.30 11.35 ——
New Orleans, quiet... 10% 10’6 j7B
Houston, steady 10% 10% 317
Galveston, steady ...10% 10% HOI
COTTON SEED OIL.
NEW YORK. June 9 —Cotton seed oil
quotations today ruled as follows:
Close: June. '5.73®5.78. July, 5 [email protected].
KANSAS CITY GRAIN.
KANSAS CITY. Mo,. June Caah
grain quotations ruled todays as follows:
Whrat: No. hard. $1.39® 1.45. No. 2 red,
$1.53®1.57.
Com: No. 2. 72c. No. 2 white, 73c.
Oata: No. 2, 58c@5516. No. 2 ws»ite,
5»%c®61. ,
DETAILS WANTED,
“That fellow works in his office
every night. Bound to get ahead, eh ”
“I don’t know,” answered the wise
citizen. “Docs he toil nights because his
work is heavy, or because he spends
his days discussing batting averages
and pennant prospects!”
BOARD OF EQUALIZATION.
Notice is hereby given that the
Honorable County Commissioners’
Court of Bexar County, Tex., will con
vene and sit as a Board of Equaliza
tion on the second Monday in June,
A. D., 1909, same being the 14th day of
said month, for the purpose of receiv
ing from the Assessor of Texas of Bexar
County all his assessment lists, books,
etc., for their inspection, correction,
equalization and approval.
( Witness my hand and official seal ef
office in San Antoni*.'. Tex., this Ist
day of June, A. D., 1909.
(Seal) FRANK R. NEWTON,
i County Clerk, Bexar County, Too.

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