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San Antonio light and gazette. [volume] (San Antonio, Tex.) 1909-1911, July 11, 1909, Image 27

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I Here’s a Page of Interesting Sporting Gossip on Timely Topics
BASEBALL OBSERVATIONALS
By Boone.
Well, that Houston series has came
at last. 'You’ve been looking forward
to it for a full month, and the chances
are you’ll be disappointed now that
it’s here. You probably figured out
early in the season that San Antonio
would have to beat Houston to get the
money, and you made such a good guess
that you are anxious to see how the
clubs stack up against each other.
Along these lines, lot’s not get i dis
couraged if we don’t make a very good
showing against the Buffaloes. They’ve
got a pretty good club, we’ve got to
admit that—a fast, hard-fighting bunch
who will stop at nothing to cop the
1909 rag. We’ve heard some stories
about their doings in Houston that do
not reflect much credit on them as real
sports, but these may be exaggerated.
It is said that the fans over there do
everything in their power to incite the
visiting players to talk back to the
bleachers, in order that something may
result that will take one or two good
,players out of the game.
The Hitless Wonders.
But, after all, that won’t get them
anvthing away from home, and they’re
going to be away from home.some time.
If the Brones will just play their usual
aggressive, hard-hittiug game, refusing
to allow the opposition to stir them
into any outbreaks, the chances are
that we’ll show them they’ve got to
make more than three or four hits to
get any money over here.
San Antonio hasn’t made less than
' six hits in any game this year, and
yet we’ve lost several with eight and
nine hits. Houston has won game after
game on two and three hits.
They’re Pretty Lucky.
People will tell you it’s because they
run the bases so well. That’s got some
thing to do with it, of course, but luck
is the main thing, after all. Luck is
always with a pinch hit. Some men
Will go all through a game without a
hit, then with a man on second or third,
he will draw just the hit that means
a run. Another man, who is really a
good hitter, will come up with men on
bases, and smash the ball square in the
nose—only to have it go straight at
some fielder —and be called a dub be
cause he couldn’t hit in a pinch.
For that matter, running the bases
Well is not cnly speed and daring—it
GUESS HE WASN'T GOING SOME
L. SCOTT WINNING CON FERENCE POLE VAULT.
This splendid photograph of Scott,
the Leland Stanford vanlter, was taken
»t the western conference track and
NICELY WORKED IRE HIT-AND-RUN
UPSETS DEFENSE AND NETS RUNS
The hit and run game, originated
by McGraw, Keeler, Robinson & Co.,
in the “good old days,” when Balti
taore was the home of hard fighting,
also has an element of luck in it. You ,
ean see it right on this team, although
we are just a trifle shy on really fast
men. Some of them have stolen scarce
ly a base this season, because every
time they start for second the catcher
throws square to the spot that will get
him.
Mclver Lucky.
On the other hand, Mclver bids fair
to lead the club in stolen bases, not
only because he is fast and slides well,
but because he is remarkably lucky in
the manner the opposing catcher pegs
to catch him. I have seen him steal
at least six bases this week, and not
once was the ball thrown within four
feet of second.
But, as I said before, we musn’t get
elated if Houston drops a majority
here, or disappointed if we lose. Of
course, a whole lot depends on the se
ries. but everything doesn’t. For that
matter, while we are fighting Houston.
Dallas or Shreveport ean slip up and
nip both of us on the heels.
You can’t tell much about this old
ball business. But San Antonio has
been going mighty good. Bad luck,
umpire troubles and all Ihe other things
that pull a club down have so far fail
ed to take us out of a commanding
position, and the race looks much like
last year’s. Last, year San Antonio
had a gruelling time of it all the way,
■ but just hung on gamely and finally
pushed the other fellows off. when they
couldn’t stand the pace any longer,
and won rather easily just at the last.
Pitcher Question Brightens.
The pitcher question ought to begin
to brighten up along towards the time
the Brones get away Tuesday. It is
known that the management has lines
out. and if some of the new acquisitions
prove to be gold bricks, other ventures
will be taken.
Did you stop to think how big a
crowd will be out to that game this
afternoon. I believe it will break even
the record for the double-header on the
Fourth of July. The chances are that
the crowd will run over onto the field,
maybe there will be as many people as
attended that famous game played here
between the New York Nationals and
the Chicago Americans, which, although
a “rotten” game, was witnessed by a
crowd that stretched completely around
the edge of the park.
, field meet, Chicago, while he was clear
i ing the bar in his winning vault of 11
I feet 10 inches.
HOW THE HIT-AND-RUN WORKS.
hard playing ball tosliers, is the most
effective play in baseball.
Well worked, nothing will more com
pletely demoralize aA innejd pj send
TWO WINGS THAT WORKED FOR 24 INNINGS
ANO THE SWATSTICK THAT ENDED THE FUN
Three players who figured prominently in the recent 24-inumg record game in the Pacific Coast league pennant
chase. From left to right, they are: Jim Wiggs, Oakland pitcher, who allowed 11 hits and 6 passes: “Slivers” Hen
ley, San Francisco’s twirler, off whom Oakland was able to gather only 9 hits and one base on balls during 24
innings; Nick Williams, San Francisco catcher, who won the game by a clean drive to right in the 24th.
\)akland, Cal., July 10.—Well, here
they are!
These are the boys who got into the
limelight a few days ago in that record
Pacific Coast league game between San
Francisco and Oakland that went
twenty-three and two-thirds innings
without a run.
Think of it! Only one man crossed
the plate in 24 innings.
The rival pitchers. Clarence (“Sliv
ers”) Henley and Jim Wiggs gave a
remarkable exhibition of skill and en
durance, each pitching the entire 24
innings, and both were strong at he
finish.
Only one man received a base on balls
from the San Francisco twirler during
the entire game. Was there ever an
other exhibition of control like it!
WHO SAID GIRLS COULDN'T
RUN AND JUMP OVER HURDLES?
<>F RECENT YEARS GIRLS HAVE BEEN ENTERING THE FIELD OF ATHLETICS WITH MORE AND
wJi ccSTO AND THE Y ARE RE AI LY BEGINNING TO LOOK LIKE ATHLETES. SOME Of IHEBIO
MORE Id SH), IHEY AKE HhAl.Ll tir.ui- sPntITS mmvn rv THE' BOYS HOLDING
EASTERN COLLEGES HAVE TAKEN UP NARU Ih ■ TORW TWtD Bl UI!E BO
TRACK AND FIELD MEETS AND THROWING THE ”
ING AND OTHER MANLY STUNTS. THIS FUTURE WAS TAKEN AT A SPRING MEET AT
COLLEGE AND SHOWS THE FINISH OF AN EXCITING UlHUhb RACE.
a pitcher up the golden stairway. Nor
is any play in baseball so well calcu
lated to get a runner around the cir
cuit.
The hit and-run works as follows:
With a runner on first, for instance,
the pitcher, obeying the backstop,
wastes two or three balls, in an effort
to catch the runner stealing. The run
ner helps this along by making bluffs
at stealing.
When ready, the man at bat, or the
runner, will pass the sign that on the
next ball pitched both will aet. As
the piteher draws back his arm, the
runner makes a dash for second and
The sun was fast sinking in the w'st
when Nick Williams, Frisco’s big
blonde catcher, ended the game with a
sizzling drive over first.
Williams, by the way, was a class
mate of “Ovie” Overall at the Uni
versity of California.
Roliie Zeider, Frisco’s sensational
third baseman, opened the 24th with a
two-base smash to left field; a bad
throw got him to third. Wiggs threw
Tennant’s bunt to third to catch Zei
der. Rollic played tag with the entire
Oakland infield until Tennant was safe
at third. Then he gave himself up.
With two gone. Williams stepped quiet
ly to the plate. He let AViggs’ first'
offering go by. Then he smote to right.
Nobody was home and one of the great
est of all diamond contests was cuded.
the batter carries through his part by
trving to hit the ball
To be successful the ball must be hit
either over th- infield or through the
spot vacated bv one ot the infielders,
hurrying to cover second.
When the play goes through the run
ner who has been racing along ever
since the pitcher drew back his arm,
nears second as the IS >
is enabled to reach third before the ball
is fielded. If the hit is a long one and
the runner speedy, the chant es of scor
ing are good. while th-' hatter often
reaches second on the throw to the
'The illustration sh-"> 'h? working
of the hit and run, the batter having
There have been several games in
history, which furnished more innings,
but none in the history of organized
baseball ever went so far without a run ;
being scored.
The nearest approach to this was back
in 1884, when Providence beat Boston
1 to 0 in 18 innings, Charley Radbourne,
one of the kings among pitchers, win
ning the game by slamming a home run
through a hole in the fence.
In the summer of 1902 the Grand
Forks and Fargo clubs, a pair of bush
teams, are credited with having gone
'25 innings without scoring a run. But
these clubs were not in organized ball,
j and therefore their record was never
: seriously taken, thougn it is marked
! down in the annals as a wonderful dia-
I mond feat.
-I hit through the spot vacated by the
j shortstop, who has hurried to cover sec
; | ond, as the man on first starts for the
' b “ S ’ -
SPORT NOTES.
, I Harry Stovey stole 156 bases in 1888,
| the world’s record.
I
I Largest minor league crowd. 20.531,
■ at Columbus Toledo game at Columbus,
11 September 1, 1907.
Johnson, Washington pitcher, shut
! out New York September 4, 5 and <,
111908, without a run.
TIP WRIGHT’S FIGHT TALK
By Tip Wnght. I <
The situation in the bantam class of
punch makers needs clarifying. Ever 1
since Monte Attell joined the brigade (
of little men who have beaten Frankie
Neil, he has been going around with
his wish bone pushed out like a pouter
pigeon, laying claim to the bantam ti- ’
tie.
From all points of the country, but
chiefly from New York, where a varied
assortment of near champions obtain
their sustenance, has come a long, loud
wail like a leaking air brake hose, and
the opinion has been expressed in vary-1
ing accents that Attell can't beat a
strong egg. _ 1
Among the boys who deny Attell s
claim to the title are Joe Wagner, whose
manager. Dick Curley, says has as dear
a claim to the championship as any boy
in the class, as during the seven years!
he lias been fighting he has been beaten I
but once, and he later reversed the
decision.-
There are others, notably Johnny
Coulon. upon whom mist of us looked
as bantam champion. Then there is;
Phillie McGovern. Charley Goodman,,
Joe Coster and “Knockout” Brown.
The real match would be between ■
AVagncr and McGovern. Each of them i
| has beaten all the others, and a bout
between them w-ould draw a well out ।
of the ground.
As far as Monte Attell is concerned. i
he may be a bantam, of course, but I 'd
like to see someone g't him to make ।
116 pounds ringside. He won’t make 1
it at 3 o’clock the day of the fight, j
Monte's title is a 3 hazy as a Scotch;
landscape.
Parker Had ’Em All Distanced.
Did you ever hear of Walter Parker?
Walter Parker was the greatest light
weight that ever drew a five-ounce,
glove onto a taper hand, and he left
when he could have won the lightweight j
championship without starting the pers-;
piration. ,
Quit it to go into vaudeville, where ।
he has to work like a nailer to make i
one-tenth of the money he could make ‘
in the fighting game. There are men
who say Parker was forced out because
I he could not be trusted.
Picture a man of 24 with the physique.
WORLD’S RECORDS
IN BASEBALL
Catcher Schreekengost accepted 899
chances in 1905.
First Baseman Donahue, Chicago, ac
cepted 1896 chances in 1907.
Second Baseman Lajoie, Cleveland,
accepted 988 chances in 1908.
Third Baseman Collins. Boston, ac
cepted 955 chances in 1892.
Outfielder Allen, Philadelphia, ac
cepted 434 chances in 1899.
Bresnahan, catching for New York,
July 28, 1908, did not have a putout
or an assist in 10 innings.
Donohue. Chicago, playing first, had
but one chance, an assist, May 23,
1906, in a nine-inning game.
Paul Hines. Harry O’Hagan. Larry
Schlafly and Harry Murch are the only
players to make unassisted triple plays.
Triple steals have been made but
twice. In 1905 Padden, Sugden and
Burkett worked the trick on the Ath
letics. and last summer Davis, Coombs
ami Oldring pulled it off on \A ashing
GREAT WELTERWEIGHT
IS AGAIN AMONG US
Home again after a strenuous cam
paign on the other side of the big
ditch. Willie Lewis, the hurricane wel
terweight, declares for a long rest.
“It’s no cinch putting away these 200,
pounders when you weigh but 145,
said Willie, referring to his fights in [
of Geo. Lavigne, the dash of Tommy
Ryan, the punch of Ketchell. the cun
ning of Kid McCoy and the skill of Abe
Attell. and you begin tc get an idea
of Walter Parker.
Built to lower the colors of Battling
or Freddie Welsh. He was as
fast as Attell and carried the wallop
that made Ketchell a champion. He
could have caught Fred Welsh and
beaten him. and Bat Nelson could not
walk in head up and take what Parker
would have handed him.
Parker fought in Philadelphia a few
years ago. He outboxed men like Geo.
Decker until they weakened, and then
handed them the old Bob Fitz shift as
a quieter; he out-slugged and battered
down men like Jack O’Neil; he outvot
ed and outboxed heavier men like Car
ter and Chambers, and then he queered
it bv being “knocked out” by Kid
Sullivan. And fight mbn declare Sulli
! van eogld not beat Parker in a month
of Sundays unless Parker wanted to be
beaten.
That fight hung the 23 sign on Wal
ter, and he left Philly taking a record
of 24 clean knockouts. 10 no-decision
■ fights and two suspicious defeats. As
' an idea of what Parker did, size up
■ this:
) Knocked out in two rounds each three
men who had beaten Cyclone Thomp
son.
Gave 20 pounds’to a good middle
weight and slaughtered him.
Stopped in 20 seconds a man who
held Jaek O’Keef even when O’Keef
was real good.
Made Harry Lewis a great fighter.
Taught Grover Hayes and Jack Brit
i ton what they now know.
Trained Papke for his second fight
with Kelly.
He fought 127 battles and 93 of Es
' opponents finished on the floor. And
* vet- —right now, in his prime, he can H
. get a fight.
Parker and his fights will always be
I a ring mystery. He did not have a
I yellow streak because some of his bat
' ties were too great, too deeiperate for
1 that. He won a fight in Milwaukee
with his right arm broken for two
rounds, and one when both hands were
useless, simply by feinting and dazzling
. footwork.
VARIOUS RECORDS
MADE IN BASEBALL
Successive pitching victories. Jas.
McCormick, Chicago. 24 games, 1886.
Successive pitching record. Chas.
Radbourne, Providence. 37 games. 1883.
Strike out record in nine innings. Na
tional league, Chas. Sweeney, Provi
dence, 21; American league, Rube Wad
dell and Fred Glade, 16.
Greatest number of game* pitched
in one season. 18. Radbourne, 1864.
Greatest number of bases on batts in
a season, Rusie, 1892, 261.
Season's strike-out record, Waddell,
301, 1903.
Overhand pitching was authorized in
1884.
Chas. Bomar of the Deeatur Threed
league club, in 1907, was not defeated
in his last 22 games. He won 20 and
two were ties.
Wm. Hart, Little Rock, has pitched
continuously for 22 years, starting at
Chattanooga in 1885.
WILLIE LEAVIS.
j Paris. “I want to rest my hands and
get them into condition for some of the
tough boys on this side.”
Lewis won the welterweight cham
pionship of England from Jeptha with
greater ease than he will win decis
ions over the men iu his class in this
. country.

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