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San Antonio light and gazette. [volume] (San Antonio, Tex.) 1909-1911, August 19, 1909, Image 1

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FUSTEURIZED MILK AND CREAM
Twelve Wagons to Maks Deliveries to
AU Farts of the City.
Creamery Dairy Co. Phones 871
VOLUME 29. No. 212
RECONSIDER
NO-SHINGLE
ORDINANCE
Over Ten Thousand Citizens
Sign Petition to City Council
Making This Request.
COMMITTEE TO HEAR
PROTEST THIS AFTERNOON
The campaign against the no-shin
gle ordinance Is on.
Armed with arguments, general con
tractors, builders, architects, lumber
men and others will at 4 o’clock this
afternoon meet the fire committee of
the city council following the presenta
tion of the lengthy petition to which
are attached over 10,000 names of pro
testants against the ordinance barring
shingle roofs. Concrete instances will
be given when the ordinance, if per
mitted to become operative, will reduce
the building now planned and letters
of property owners cancelling contracts
for residences will be shown the coun
cilmen.
The claim will be made that the pres
ent high rate of construction in San
Antonio will be shattered and the city
seriously set back if metal or tile roofs
are insisted on to the exclusion of shin
gles.
Argument for Shingle Roofs.
The argument, in brief, that will be
advanced is that the council has car
ried the matter too far; that the tin
or metal roof is unbearably hot in this
climate and it would be a grave mis
take so far as comfort during the sum
mer months is concerned, to insist on
it, to say nothing of the increased cost
to the builder or property owner. The
lumbermen, builders, architects and
others are in favor of a fire ordinance
as strict as the council may desire, if
it is kept in the congested business
section, but to make it apply generally
over the city will have the effect of
restricting building and seriously im
pair the welfare of the city as a whole,
just at this time when such strides are
being made in the building up of the
residence districts, by new residents,
who, attracted by San Antonio’s cli
mate and other advantages, are coming
from all sections of the country to
make their homes here.
Will Attack Aidermen’s Argument.
The argument of the councilmen that
it is necessary to enforce such restric
tions as contemplated in residence dis
tricts like Beacon Hill and Laurel
Heights, where the fire protection is
inadequate, will be attacked by the
Continued on Page Twelve.
ELEVEN MEN
ARE DROWNED
Associated Press.
Lunenburg, N. 8., Aug 19.—The
Gloucester fishing schooner Orinoco
capsized here today and eleven men,
all Nova Scotians, were drowned.
' BARGE AND GO MW GE LOST
Broke Away From Tug In a
Gale and Only Wreckage Is
Found After Search,
CARRIED A CREW
OF TWELVE MEN
Associated Press.
Saunderstown. R. L, Aug 19.—The
tugs Valley Forge and Monocacy ar
rived here this morning with tows and
the captain of the Valley Forge report
ed the loss of the barge Shawmont
with a crew of twelve «nen during a
gale early Tuesday morning. It is fear
ed the big barge went to the bottom
with all hands.
Five other barges bound for Provid
ence, Boston and Newburyport, broke
away and floated helpless for ten hours
before they were picked up. The
barges left Philadelphia Sunday in tow
of the Valley Forge and Monocacy.
When off Shinnock they ran into a
heavy northeast gale that prevailed
along the coast Monday night and
Tuesday. The Shawmont was the first
barge in the tow of the Valley Forge
that broke loose Tuesday morning and
the tngs cruised for ten hours, but there
was no trace of the Shawmont except‘
some wreckage and the captain finally
, decided she had gone to the bottom. I
SAN ANTONIO LIGHT
AND GAZETTE
GRAND JURY
NAY MEET
NEXT MONTH
Gambling Investigation Will
Probably Be C a r r I e d On
During Special Session.
DEFINITE ANNOUNCEMENT
HAS NOT BEEN MADE
Will there be a grand jury impan
eled at the special session of the Thir
ty-seventh district court, which opens
Monday, Sept. 6?
This question when put to District
Attorney Baker was answered:
“I do not know at this time. If a
grand jury is needed Judge Dwyer has
the authority to organize one during
a special session of his conrt. Up to
this time no order has been issued for
a special grand jury.”
Report is in circulation that since the
raid of a gambling house by state rang
ers last week a special grand jury is
to be organized to further investigate
gaming in this city and that Assistant
District Attorney Chambers, who called
on the governor to send the rangers
here, and who has filed two charges of
gaming in Justice Fisk’s court against
persons, alleged to have operated gamb
ling places not in the trans San Pedro
district, will take a prominent part in
the investigation.
It has been pointed out that a spe
cial grand jury in September will be a
needless expense to the taxpayers as
the regular grand jury meets on the
first Monday in October.
WOMAN GIVES
WORD TO FIRE
Associated Press.
Pittsburg, Pa., Aug. 19^—Shortly af
ter noon alleged strike sympathizers
opened fire upon the steamer Pfeil,
which was bringing 50 imported men
across the Ohio river to the mill of the
Pressed Steel Car company at McKee’s
Rocks.
Several thousand strikers were lined
up along the river bank and each vol
ley was discharged at the command of
an unknown foreign woman who car
ried a baby. No one was injured.
TEXAN BREAKS
WORLD RECORD
Special Dispatch.
Austin, Tex., Aug. 19.—Advices re
ceived today from Adjutant Newton at
Camp Perry, Ohio, is to the effect that
Clarence L. Test, a member of the
Texas rifle team, has broken the
world’s record in the Herrick match
there by a score of 221 at SOO, 900 and
1000 yards. Test was formerly acting
postmaster of Austin. Newton also
wires that the balance of the team is
doing fine in the preliminaries
WELLMAN IS
ON HIS WAY
Associated Press.
Paris, Aug. 19. —A special dispatch
as received from Trieste saying,
according to a telegram received from
the captain of the Italian steamer Tha
lia, now at Hammerfest, Norway, Wal
ter ellman left Spitzbergen August 16
in his dirigible balloon bound for the
north pole. He had a favorable wind
when the start was made.
LOCAL WEATHERj
For San Antonio and vicinity,
F tonight and Friday:
Fair; cooler tonight.
The maximum temperature
for the 24 hours ending at 8
A o'clock this morning was 106
degrees and the minimum was
78 degrees.
I Comparative temperatures for
this year and last:
1908 1909 '
4 a. m 71 81
6 a. m 70 80
■ar 8 a. m 78 83
■ > 10 a m 79 90
13 noon 84 100
1 p. m 87 108
12 PAGES
COURIER SAW
EGGS COOKED
IN THE SAND
Will Make Thirty-five Miles To
day Through Hots Sands
of Oklahoma.
CROWD FOLLOWS HIM
LIKE CIRCUS PARADE
4444444444**4****
4 ♦
4 BY E. S. O’REILLY. 4
♦ 4
♦ Mill Creek, Okla., Aug. 19. — 4
♦ After cutting across the conn- 4
4 try I slept in an Indian house 4
♦ in the Washita bottoms last 4
♦ night. I will ride thirty-five 4
4 miles today and sleep in Sul- 4
4 phur tonight. . 4
♦ 4
44444444444444444
It is 110 in the shade and
this hot sand is frightful
A horse dropped dead in the street
today and the boys here have cooked
eggs in the sand. I am hanging up hero
for a brief rest.
I met Chief Johnson, governor of
the Choctaw tribe, last night, and be
signed my book. Tom Bell of Wells
also signed yesterday.
People through here follow me like
a circus parade. It seems that every
paper in Oklahoma has been carrying
stories of the ride. I have been cordial
ly welcomed at every stop made in
Oklahoma. I have been advised that a '
monster reception is being arranged -
for me at Oklahoma City.
WHOLE COUNTRY IN
GRIP OF HEAT WAVE
Louisiana Today Feels Effects of Extreme Tempera
ture—Read the List Below and Pick the Hot
test Place on the Map.
The heat wave has extended into other states of the south and
Louisiana is today sweltering in a temperature of 110 at places.
From Baton Rouge comes reports of between ten and fifteen
heat prostrations. Some Texas cities have cooled off a little, but
the rule is for record-breaking temperatures. Thermometers in the
cotton belt yesterday registered as high as 114 and Corpus Christi
was the coolest place with a temperature of 90. San Antonio’s record
of vesterdav, the highest in twenty years, bids fair to be outstripped
todav. Late this afternoon a temperature of 104 was registered at
the weather bureau office. At Fort Worth the thermometer regis
tered 100 at noon and the city felt instant relief.
SAN ANTONIO AT 106
WAS AN “ALSO RAN”
SIZZARD. That’s the word that was
coined just to describe the present hot
I spell in Texas.
San Antonio, with a maximum tem
perature of 106 yesterday, was <» i y an
' also-ran in th? tempe’ature flights.
! Dallas, Greenville, Pn.i« and Waxaha
' chie were easy winno-s with a register
ed temperature of 114. Corsican». Fort
j Worth, Mexia, Qnanrh and Lampasas
tied for second with 112 each. Long
view and Temple born showed with a
registered mark of 110. .All the other
cities in the state trailed along with
temperatures down tc 90 at Corpus
Christi, the coolest place in the state.
Temperatures over 100 were as common
as aeroplanes will be at Rheims next
week.
The San Antonio mark yesterday tied
with the record hot day since the es
tablishment of the weather bureau in
this city. On July 6, 1894, the mercury
climbed" to 106 and the feat was never
duplicated until yesterday.
Major Buell says there are some signs
of rain and showers are not improba-:
ble. though the meteorological condi-!
tions indicate fair weather tonight and
Friday with cooler air tonight.
Do you get that? Cooler air tonight.
Go to it. major, we’re all with vou.
CARPENTER IS
OVERCOME BY HEAT
F. M. Mills, a carpenter, residing at
123 Diaz street, was overcome by the
heat at noon today while at work on
a new building on Crofton avenue. After I
receiving medical attention be was re-:
moved to his home, where he is reported ’
to be in a critical condition.
HEAT KILLInToFF
THE BOLL WEEVIL
AssocUted Press. 8
Monroe, La., Aug. W.—Reports re
ceived here from nearby towns in Ark-1
ansas. Mississippi and Louisiana indi
cate intensely hot weather, which is
SAN ANTONIO. TEXAS. THURSDAY. AUGUST 19. 1909.
BODSIDREAM
IS REALIZED
Grand Old State of Texas Of
ficially Has a Population of
Over Five Million People.
Special Dispatch.
Austin, Tex., Aug. 19.—The drean>
of the boosters of Texas for a five mil
lion population is more than realized.
It was disclosed today that the popula
tion of the state is" 5,693,664. This
figure is reaehde by very simple meth
ods through the new liquor law, which
requires one saloon for every 500 popu
lation in each county and this is reach
ed by figuring one scholar for every six
persons in Texas. There are 948,994 chil
dren of scholastic age in Texas, as dis
closed by the figures of the state de
partment of education, which pulti
plied by six, gives Texas a population
of 5,693,664, while most enthusiastic
boosters of Texas thought four mil
lions was conservative.
KAISER WILL WATCH
ORVILLE WRIGHT ELY
Berlin, Aug. 19.—Orville Wright,
Sister Katherine and Hart Berg, Euro
pean business manager of the Wright
brothers, arrived today from London
Wright is to make a series of public
flights on the Tempelhof parade grounds
in the suburbs of Berlin. If he is ready
by the end of the month, Emperor Wil
liam will probably witness one of his
exhibitions.
ELECTION JUDGES
ARE BEING PAID TODAY
County Clerk Frank Newton is today
paying off the judges and clerks who
officiated in the special constitutional
amendment election held Aug. 3. The
election cost the county about $3 for
every vote cast.
killing off the boll weevil at a rapid
rate and the damage from this pest
will be much less than at first believ
ed. Temperatures from 95 to 100 are
being reported.
HIGH TEMPERATURE
ON GOVERNMENT HILL
The temperature on Government Hill,
the highest point in the city, at 2
o’clock this afternoon, was 103 in the
shade and 128 in the sun.
HEAT PROSTRATION
RESULTS FATALLY
Special Dispatch.
Waco. Tex.. Aug. 19.—Dr. J. A. Hil
liard, formerly of Hughes Springs,
Tex., died this morning as a result of
heat prostration here yesterday after
noon. He leaves a widow and one child.
The heat abated here today.
ONLY 100 AT FORT WORTH.
Special Dispatch
Fort Worth. Tex., Aug. 19.—Cooler
weather prevails heretoday, the temper
ature dropping from one hundred and
twelve degrees to one hundred. The
fall in temperature relieves much suf
fering.
No prostrations were reported so far
today.
Cooler at Gainesville.
Special Dispatch.
Gainesville. Tex . 'ug. 19.- A drop
of twenty degrees in the temperature
since yesterday, when was 112, is a,
great relief. Cool w st winds are blow
ing today.
Prostrations in Louisiana.
Associated Press. 1
Baton Rouge. La.. Aut 19 -Between ; .
ten and fifteen heat prostrations have I <
been reported at Baton Rouge during [«
the last twenty-four hours Today the;«
mercury is hovering around the 110 .
degree mark and this secien of Louis- 3
iana is sweltering. No deaths have oc- 4
curred 1
TEN MILE AUTO RECORD SMASHED
$150,000,000 GRAFT
CAMPAIGN EXPOSED
*444444444444444*44
4 ’ *
4 IKE T. PRYOR *
4 OF SAN ANTONIO. +
* *
•4***4*44444444444
IKE T. PRYOR IS
AGAIN ELECTED
Associated Press.
Denver, Colo., Aug. 19.—The com
mittee on permanent organization of
the TransMiseisaippi congress has
elected the following officers:
President, Ike T. Pryor, San Antonio.
Tex.
First vice president, A. C. Trum,
Oklahoma.
Second vice president, Samuel F.
Dutton, Denver.
Third vice president, W. F. Baker,
Iowa; secretary, Arthur N. Francis,
Colorado.
SEVEN CADETS ARE
DISMISSED BY TAFT
Associated Press.
West Point, N. Y., Aug. 19.—8 y di
rection of President Taft seven cadets
were dismissed from the United States
military academy for being involved
in the hazing of Rolando Sutton. Cadet
Sutton is a brother of Lieut. Janies
Sutton, naval academy, whose death
was investigated at Annapolis recent
ly-
The cadets ordered dismissed are:
John Booker Jr., West Point, Georgia,
first class; Richard Hocker, Kansas
City, Mo, third class; Earle Dunmore,
Utica, N. Y., third class; Chauncey De
vore, Wheeling, W. Va., third class;
Gordon Lefevre, Richmond, Va., third
class; Albert Crane, Hawarden, lowa,
third class; Jacob Fortner, Dotham
Ala., third class.
HEAT WAVE TAKES
IN GULF STATES
Associated Press
New Orleans, La., Aug. 19. —With a
path of death in its wake the heat
wave which has been sweeping south
westward across the country during the
last few days, is today central over the
lower Mississippi valley. High temper
atures which prevailed yesterday
throughout this section now appear to
have been but the forerunners of a hot
blast which todav prostrated scores of
people in the gulf states and worked
heavy damage in other ways. While
towns in northern Louisiana and Ark
ansas today report a drop of tempera
ture, there has been a corresponding
rise in those sections to the south
west of the country which experience!’
such intense heat 24 hours ago.

EMERGENCY RATES ORDERED
BY RAILROAD COMMISSION.
Special Dispatch.
Austin, Tex., Aug. 19. —The railroad
commission today ordered emergency
rates of 7 cents per hundred weight on
window glass, doors, blinds, etc., ef
fective Aug. 26. This is done to protect
Texas manufacturers against reduced
interstate rates.
444444*4444444444
4 4
RAnf IN panhandle.
4 Special Dispatch. 4
4 Amarillo, Tex., Aug. 19.— 4
4 Rains were general over this see- 4
4 tion of the Panhandle this morn- 4
+ ing and were of great benefit to 4
4 all interests. 4
+ ♦
12 PAGES
Ex-Police Commissioner States
That Plans for City's Theft
at Polls Are Complete,
Mew York, Aug. 19.—Developments
today indicate that Tammany hall will
make the greatest fight of its life for
political existence. With election 75
days off Tammany is lining up for the
greatest graft campaign in the history
of the American nation.
It was openly charged in the meet
ing at the Bronx today that thugs
would rule New York for the next two
months and that 150 millions of graft
money is in the balance.
In a statement today an ex police
commissioner says:
The underworld supposes that the
way is fixed, so far as the police are
concerned, and Tammany is to use the
repeater to get the desired majority
vote. The repeater is well-known to be
Tammany’s real and almost unfailing
fountain of power. It is estimated that, t
with the criminals of the crowded tene- ।
ment districts properly lined up, 50,000 '
illegal votes can be polled, and this is ।
usually enough to carry an eletcion.
These repeaters—pickpockets, strong- .
arm men, waiters in dives and saloons,
white slave herders, vag’ants and down
and-out gamblers, for gambling is dead,
will this year have to conform to new
rules. Heretofore the thousands of re
peaters, organized into bands led by no-
I torious desperadoes, voted as often as
I they were told to. Traveling in small.
i parties, they voted under fictitious I
j names in the forenoons of election days, I
and in the afternoons voted hit and
miss upon the names of citizens dead,;
I ill, detained, drunk or for any other
reason not appearing. There is now a
new law which provides that a voter
' must write his name in the registry
. book and write a comparison signature
when he votes. Tammany /has such
complete control of election officers in
the tenement districts that she fears
little, because, as the tip went out in
the underworld, “they won’t com-i
pare.”
Nevertheless the hall is making an
elaborate plan for repeating, using one
particular man for each false name.
This will necessitate the intelligent sup
port of the big criminal gangs, and, as
■if to encourage the gang leaders to
। loyal support, “Monk” Eastman, the
■ most notorious and vicious criminal
( gangster in the history of the east side,
I has just been released from Sing Sing,
J having been pardoned because of his
{“exemplary prison conduct” and
{“without consideration of his previous
behavior.”
Every lynx-eyed, ballot-stuffing vil
! lain in New York knows the significance
, of the pardoning of the monkey-faced
Eastman, who was the first general '
i leader of the lawless east side gangs.
, First, a thief, then a white slave trader
I on a large and cheap scale, a Fagan
! trainer of pickpockets, this infamous
and brutal ruffian led Tammany’s crim-
I inal forces in the campaign of 1901 and
. established efficiency of the present
| gang system.
Monk was arrested many times for
! violent offenses, but always escaped
easily—even a murder charge—until, in
11904, he was arrested for robbery and
1 shooting at policemen in one of the
I most crowded streets of the city. They
had to send him up for that.
At a former trial it was brought out
that Eastman ran a sort of bandit bu
reau where thugs might be hired for
any evil purpose.
Among the present influential gang
leaders on the east side are two young
Italians, ealling themselves Paul and
Jim Kelly. They operate tough sa
loons at various times, deal in white
slaves, are frequently arrested, but al
ways manage to escape. Within a week
Paul Kelly was involved in a vicious
street fight.
Last winter the Jimmy Kelly gang
had a ball in Tammany hall. After the
dance Kelly and others of his gang
entered a saloon. “Humpty” Jackson,
another notorious gang leader, now in
Sing Sing for robbing express wagons, |
and members of his gang, also entered '
the saloon, and, sore on Kelly because
he was becoming a Tammany favorite,
drew revolvers and began firing. Kelly
and another man were wounded and
Jaekson and his men escaped.
Since then there has been a fierce
feud between these gangs, and there
have been many shootings on the east
side, several of the injured being inno
cent bystanders.
K IS CLOSED
The guessing contest is closed. No more estimates will be re
ceived and all must now await the telegram from Courier O’Reilly,
announcing the hour of his arrival in Oklahoma City.
Several thousand guesses are in. They are all filed in tabulated
order so that the name of the winner may be announced at once upon
receipt of the word of O'Reilly’s arrival.
VELVET ICE CREAM
“Tastes Like More."
At fountains. Orders for banquets, re
ceptlons, lodges club altalrs and tami.
trade a specialty.
Creamery Dairy Co. Phones 871
PRICE: FIVE CENTS
Chevrolet In a Buick Car Clips
a Little Off Barney Old
field's Previous Mark.
TDBIN DE HIMEL IN BIG EVENT
Two-Hundred and Fifty Mile
Grind Last on Card.
STOODARD-DAYTON WINS EVENT
INDIANAPOLIS, IND., ANG. 19 —
THE TEN-MILE RACE WAS WON
BY A BUICK (CHEVROLET), TIME,
8:56 4-10. THIS IS A NEW AMERI
CAN TRACK RECORD, BREAKING
THE FORMER MARK OF 9:12,
HELD BY BARNEY OLDFIELD.
i Associated Press.
Indianapolis. Ind., Aug. 19.—Ths
$400,000 Indianapolis speedway was
formally opened today with a progjam
of five well-balanced races, with a 250-
mile grind ending the day's sport.
t Fred Wagner started the contestanta
।in the five-mile stripped class race at
noon and a three days’ speed carnival
। was on. The big grandstand was com
} fortably filled with a crowd of auto
mobile enthusiasts from all parts of
i the country. All day yesterday and
this morning out-of-town devotees of
| racing poured in until this city is filled
almost to overflowing.
The big race of the afternon will be
। at 250 miles for the $l5OO Prest-O-Lite
trophy. It has drawn eleven entries, as
I follows: Jackson (2), Stoddard-Dayton
{ (2), “Chalmers-Detroit, National (2),
i Buick (3) and Knox.
Event number one, the five miles
I' stripped Chasis, was won by a Stoddard
. Dayton (Schwitzer) in the fast time
r of 5:13 2-5.
a Aside from the magnitude of the In
, dianapolis automobile races, San Anto
} nians are peculiarly interested in them
because one of their native sons is
I to lose or win his spurs during the next
I three days. Tobin DeHymel, little more
j than a boy, but full of that nerve and
I coolness so essential to a good driver,
which came with his Texas birthright,
jis driving a powerful Stoddard-Dayton
and will have ample opportunity to
find out just how good he is.
While he has never been tried, on
the many races he has entered he has
never been found wanting in any qual
ity. He has had a meteoric career in
the motor racing field, but the coming
races will be Iris first appearance
against the really big drivers on a mo
tor speedway.
Opposed to him will be such drivers
as Barney Oldfield, Raph De Palma,
Louis Strang, Chevrolet and hundreds
of others. DeHymel will likely make
his first start in the feature event,
'the 250-mile race, which comes last on
the card this afternoon. He will drive
a model ”8” sixty-horsepower Stod
dard.
WOMAN RIDES A
BUCKING BRONCHO
Associated Press.
Cheyenne, Wyo., Ang. 19. —Wild west
sports began in earnest yesterday in
connection with the Frontier Day cele
bration. In the wild horse race, six
men pitted their skill against the ani
mals. One man was thrown, several
were carried through fences and one was
painfully hurt from a kick on the breast.
The race was won by Mose Reader of
Cheyenne. Nick Maher won the steer
| roping event, his time being .25 2 5 sec
onds. The first exhibition of bucking
broncho riding by a woman ever given
at a Frontier Day celebration occurred
when Mrs. Hernie St. Clair, who holds
1 the title of champion woman rider of
the world, succeeded in subduing a vi
; eious bucker.
HURT IN COLLISION:
MAY LOSE A LEG
Santiago Chacon, a Mexican run over
by an automobile on Houston street
last Monday, was removed to his home
at 137 North street from the city hos
pital yesterday. The wheels of the ma
chine passed over his legs near the
knee and fractured the bones. It is
thought that ho will lose ths right leg.

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