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San Antonio light and gazette. [volume] (San Antonio, Tex.) 1909-1911, August 20, 1909, Image 1

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PASTEURIZED MILK HD CREAH
Twelve Wagons to Stake DeUverles to
All Parts of ths City.
Creamery Dairy Co. Phones 871
VOLUME 29. No. 213
PLAN TO FORGE
CERTIFICATES OF
BIG RAILROADS
Biggest Swindling Game of the
Decade Shows Startling
Developments Today.
hAD MILLION BAD DOLLARS
Headquarters of Daring Gang
of Counterfeiters Said to Be
In Wall Street, New York.
LEADER MAKES CONFESSION
Women In the Case Made Pos
sible Capture of the Gang
Near Louisville,'
Associated Press.
Louisville, Ky., Aug. 20.—With the
exception of the negro who acted as
the drayman of the cart from the coun
terfeit “mint” at Herrod’s Creek, this
county, where bogus 100 pesos Mexican
notes were printed, the police have put
behind the bars all supposed to
have been connected with the $1,000,000
counterfeit enterprise unearthed in Ken
tucky yesterday.
John Roberts, who was in charge of
making the counterfeit money; Marion
Roberts, John’s brother, who handled
the negotiable end of the deal; Nannie
Harp. Marion’s housekeeper, and Will
Koenig, hwo has confessed to printing
the notes, are all under arrest.
Mrs. Harp and Koenig have been re
leased. Koenig under $l5OO bond and
Mrs. Harp on her own recognizance.
Both the Roberts brothers are in
durance under a $15,000 federal bond
each, and John has already announced
that he will plead guilty in the federal
court. The final details of the swin
dling plot shaw that the plans of the
brothers contemplated “faking” even
stocks and certificates of railroads,
such as the Louisville & Nashville and
Pennsylvania, issuing counterfeit money
to pay for them and conducting an
imaginary business with the imitation
collateral.
A brass bound trunk with $1,000,000
in Mexican notes is the most important
capture and it is evidence in a specific
case in the federal court.
In a statement to the press this fore
noon, W. G. Osborne, the broker of J.
M. Fetter & Co., who tipped the affair
to the police, said that Marion Roberts
told him that the headquarters of the
Tang was on Wall street, New York.
Burglary and Theft Charge.
Columbus Ross waived examination in
Justice Fisk’s court this morning on the
charge of burglary and theft and was
bound over to the grand jury in the sum
of $750. Failing to furnish bail he was
remanded to jail.
BARNEY OLDFIELD FAILS BL AN
INSTANT TO LOWER RECORD
INDIANAPOLIS, AUG. 20. — BAR
NEY OLDFIELD IN A BENZ COVER
ED A MILE IN 43 2-10, FAILING TO
EQUAL THE RECORD OF TESTER
DAY BY ONE TENTH OF A SECOND.
THE FIVE MILES STRIPPED
CHASSIS WAS WON BY A BUICK,
WITH STRANG DRIVING. TIME,
4:48.
THE TEN-MILE STRIPPED CHAS
SIS WAS WON BY A NATIONAL
WITH MERZ DRIVING. TIME, 9:16
3-10.
The second day of the automobile
speed carnival at the new Indianapolis
motor speedway opened with the five
mile stripped car class race today. A
large crowd turned out to enjoy a pro-1
WOMAN WINS WAGER SCALING
A LOCAL SKYSCRAPER
Climbing to the top of a ten-story building On a ladder in order to win a $5
wager was a feat pulled off at an early hour yesterday morning by Mrs. Sue
Henry of this city. The structure selected for the remarkable climb was the
Stowers’ building now in the course of construction at the corner of Main ave
nue and Houston street.
L C. Shafer, a brother-in-law of Mrs. Henry, in telling of the wager won by
his relative, said: “A few days ago I climbed to the top of that structure and
had a commanding view of the entire city. A person feels awful queer at such
a dizzy height, and I related my experience to Mrs. Henry at eur home last
Wednesday night.
“The latter said that she would not be afraid to climb to the top and I jok
ingly offered to wager her the sum of 85 if she could duplicate my feat. She
accepted the challenge and I thought no more of the matter until we reached
the building shortly after daybreak yesterday morning.
“When we reached the corner, Mrs. Henry reminded me of the wager and
said that she meant to win the money. After securing consent of the contractor
for Mrs. Henry to go up, she went to the northwest corner and in a few minutes
was above the fifth story. She waved her hand to us from that elevation and
a short time later we observed her at the top round of the ladder.
“On reaching the ground she said that she had been slightly nervous before
starting down from the fact that she observed the great height bnt it did not
1 ->-ry her in the least in ascending the ladder.’*
SAN ANTONIO LIGHT
AND GAZETTE
WEDDING STOPPED BY MESSAGE
OWS HORSE
JUMPS INTO FENCE
Becomes Frightened Just After
Leaving Sulphur, Okla.
BY E. S. O'REILLY.
Sulphur, Okla., Aug. 20. —Just after
riding out of Sulphur this morning on
the trail to Purcell, my horse became
frightened at some object in the road
and before I could stop him? he had
dashed into a barbed wire fence. He
was badly cut on the forelegs. I escaped
injury. This accident will delay me a
short while. I returned as soon as pos
sible to Sulphur, where the horse’s in
juries were given medical attention. 1
expect to resume the journey towards
Purcell this afternoon.
This town is called Sulphur. I think
“and brimstone” should be added to
it in summer, especially at this time.
I don’t know what the tmperature is
here. When I arrived last evening the
first thing I asked was how high was
the mercury. The answer I got was,
“We don’t know. When the last ther
mometer busted at 4 o’clock the 114
mark had been passed.”
I covered thirty-five miles through
hot, sandy roads yesterday, reaching
here last night.
OFFER REWARD
FOR JEWELS
Aisocisted Preis.
New York, Aug. 20.—A package of
jewelry said to be worth considerably
more than $25,000, which was in charge
of an employe of a firm of Fifth ave
nue jewelers, was lost recently on an
Eric railroad ferry boat and the firm
offered a reward of $5OOO for it. De
tectives have been searching vainly for
the lost jewelry. The package contain
ed a diamond tiara, a brooch, a dia
monded studded watch and a large em
erald.
LOOKING FOR
SMUGGLERS
Special Dispatch.
Fort Worth, Tex., Aug. 20.—Three
Chinamen were captured here today
near the Texas & Pacific passenger sta
tion by United States Immigration Offi
cer Henry Moler. The Orientals were
taken before Federal Commissioner
Dodge and held under thousand dollar
bonds each for a hearing September 4
on a charge of being unlawfully in the
United States. An investigation is on
to arrest those responsible for smug
gling them.
gram of varied interest which promised
| to show nearly every racing car gath
ered at the new track in at least one of
: the races.
One of the events that attracted the
- greatest interest was the trial to lower
; the world’s track record for one miie and
\ one kilometer. The setting of a record
of 43 1-10 by Barney Oldfield in his
Benz yesterday added new attractions
to this event.
The bodies of William Bourque and
: Harry Holcombe, members of the Knox
racing team who were killed in the 250-
mile race yesterday, were taken east to
day. Bourque lived at Springfield,
Mass., while Holcombe’s home was in
I Grandville, Mass.
12 PAGES
Clerk Was Just About to Deliver
License to Ninth Infantry
Man When It Came.
GIRL REPORTED UNDER AGE
Special Dispatch.
Fort Worth, Tex., Aug. 20.—Just as
a marriage license was about to be de
livered by the clerk to J. N. Stepp,
private in company L. Ninth infantry,
of San Antonio, and Miss Buthie Jour
dan of Aubrey, Grayson county, the
girl’s parents telephoned the Tarrant
county sheriff to stop the wedding as
the intended bride was under eighteen
•years. The message came just in time
to prevent the marriage.
EXPECT HEAT WAVE
TO BREAK SOON
Major Buell Locates a Storm
In Northern Mexico and
Tries to Have It Hore.
Major Buell is working overtime try
ing to coax a rain storm to sweltering
San Antonio.
“Give me a little time and I will
drive this persistent heat wave away,”
said the major this morning. “I find
on the map this morning a little storm
maneuvering around northeast Mexico
and it may result in showers and slight
ly cooler weather in south Texas, But
I am afraid that high temperatures
will continue until a ‘high’ comes in
from the northwest and there is no
sign of that on the weather map to
day.
“It looks to me that cloudy weather
will prevail tonight and tomorrow with
slightly lower temperature. This is the
best I can do. Tell San Antonians to
be patient, I 'll get cool weather and it
will be before December, too.”
Thermometers in San Antonio con
tinue to be red hot. The highest tem
perature yesterday was 105, one degree
below the record of Wednesday. The
mercury was 104 at 3 o’clock this after
noon. But we are not as bad off as
some other Texas towns. Take a glance
at these temperatures reported yester
day: Brenham, 110; Lampasas, Del
Rio, Cuero, 108; Corsicana. Dallas,
Huntsville, Taylor, Waco, Waxahachie,
106. Corpus Christi was the coolest
place in the state yesterday, 92.
Many Fans Are Working.
There has been a rush for electric
fans in the city during the past week
and today not one was left in the elec
tric appliance houses.
“This has been a big week for the
electric fan dealers,” said a dealer this
morning. “I have been in business
here many years and this is the first,
time that I find myself without an
electric fan in the shop.”
Special Diepatck
Fort Worth, Tex., Aug. 20. —Reports
at 2 o’clock this afternoon say that
heavy rains are falling in Dallas and
Hillsboro. At that hour rain was fall
ing in Forth Worth.
TROOPS SENT
TO SALTILLO
Special Dispatch.
El Paso, Tex., Aug. 20. —Dispatches
were received here today saying addi
tional government troops were pouring
into Saltillo to cope with any outbreak
as a result of the political agitation
which is now felt over northern Mex
ico. In Monterey it is reported the
streets today are patroled by soldiers
as it is the birthday anniversary of
General Reyes and a disturbance is fear
ed. It is quiet today, but trouble is ex
pected tonight.
LAND FORFEITURE
LIST MADE PUBLIC
Special Diepatch.
Austin. Tex., Aug. 20.—The long ex
pected land forfeitures for non-payment
of interest which has been due since
last November was made public today
by Land Commissioner Robison. The
list embraces approximately 4000 tracts
situated in various counties in Texas,
amounting to about 175,000 acres. This
land will be sold on Oct. 4 and pur
chasers need not have to live on the
land to become purchasers.
$20,000 FOR DECORATIONS.
Special Diepatch.
Juarez, Mex., Aug. 20.—Word was
received here today that $20,000 had
been appropriated by the Mexican gov
ernment for decoratine this eity in
honor of the visit of Taft to Diaz. Oc
tober 16. A bull fi<»ht will be the feat
ure of the entertainmo”* although it
is not believed either Taft or Diaz will
attend.
♦ » »
Ida Johnson Fined.
Ida Johnsoff, a negress. was tried be
fore a jury in Justice Fisk’s court yes
terday afternoon on the charge of dis
turbing the peace and fined 41 and
costs.
SAN ANTONIO. TEXAS. FRIDAY, AUGUST 20, 1909.
104 This Afternoon.
RAIN AT DALLAS.
MAYTHROWBOMB
INTO HIGH PLAGES
INFINANCtWORLD
Donald Persch, Held Under
$50,000 Bail In Heinze Stock
Theft Case, May Confess.
WANTS TO WIN FREEDOM
Declares That Those Con
cerned With Him Are High Up
In the World of Finance.
NEW YORK IS ON TIP-TOE
Indictments Are Expected to
Follow Statement By Persch.
Wall St. “Wants to Know."
New York. Aug. 30.—Sensational dis
closures may be expected in the finan
cial muddle caused bv the Heinze stock
theft in which Donald Persch, a note
broker, has been arrested on charges
of grand larceny and is being held in
the Tombs prison, unable to furnish
the $50,000 bail required.
Persch May Confess.
Persch is chafing under the confine
ment in the Tombs and is said to be
ready to make a confession which will
implicate a number of men of promi
nence in the financial world.
To a friend who visited him in the
Tombs he said:
“I will not stay in that cell another
night. If those who should come to ray
aid do not do so before sundown I shall
send word to Mr. Nott that I want to
make a confession. I shall toll all I
know, how I was used and by whom.
I simply obeyed orders given me, and
here I am in jail while others are at
large. Even at that I don’t see what
this district attorney can do to me, for
I merely acted for others.”
Some hint of what he may tell was
given yesterday by one close to him,
in outlining what his defense would be
should he determine to remain in jail
until he is placed on trial Persch will
say that a broker of prominence, whose
name is withheld now bnt who is allied
with powerful financial interests, let
it be known to men close to him that
it was desirable to get possession of
large lots of F. Augustus Heinze’s cop
per stocks and that the best way to do
this would be to induce one of Mr.
Heinze’s agents to apply for a loan
on stock of the Ohio company and the
Davis-Daly company.
Story of the Trap.
This suggestion came to the ears of
a man for whom John F. Sherwood is
agent. W. L. Clark, who is also under
arrest, approached Mr. Joyce, whose
affiliation with Mr. Heinze was known,
and informed him he could place a loan
on some copper stock. It will be said
that Mr. Joyce, not seeiny the bait in
the trap, walked into it, after Mr.
Heinze had given his approval. Then
came the offer to the Windsor Trust
company to advance $50,000 on copper
stocks. The next step was for Clark to
lead Mr. Joyce to the trust company,
where he deposited his stock and got
the $50,000, believing the company was
the principal in the loan.
If Persch can give the name of the
“broker of prominence allied with
powerful financial interests” and of
the other for whom Sherwood was the
agent, the acting district attorney
would like to know —
Young Field, who furnished Sher
wood with the $50,000 to withdraw the
stock, was nt the district attorney's
office yesterday and for the first time
talked about the transaction. Asked if
he knew to whom Persch referred as
the “man higher up,” he said he had
no idea.
yesterday the mesh widened and
included Charles Katz, president of the
Eastern Brewing companv of Brooklyn.
He was indicted by the grand jury
for complicity in the alleged theft of
20,000 shares of copper stock, which
the Windsor Trust company, with whom
it had been deposited as collateral for
a loan of $50,000 to M. M. Joyce, a
broker, for F. Augustus Heinze—nnd
bobbed up again in the curb market
when Heinze bon">'t it l '-ck again. W.
L. Clark, the broker who approached
the trust companv for .lovce, was al
so indicted.
Another development was the issu
ance of a warrant for Sterling Birm
irgham. the trust company’s discharg
ed loan clerk, who is accused of hav
ing accept< I a gratuity of $250 for
putting a loan through. To accept such
a fee is a ’ —ennor under the laws
of this state.
[local weather j
Tui Antonio and vicinity,
P tonight and Saturday:
Parti-’ cloudy.
S Th. maximum temperature
I l:<urs ending at 8
■■ morning was 105
OS™"- ..I the minimum was
degrees ami
78 degrees.
□ Comparative temperature, for
this year and last.
1908 1909
DI a - : S B*s
8 a H “
Y™ t ™ $ iss-
1 n. nuu.---
MEMBERS THROW STOCKS OVERBOARD;
EXCHANGE HAS SPASM OVER RUMORS
MOTHER JONES SHRIVES TO
BEGIN FIGHT FOR REFUGEES
Declares That Mexicans Held for Treaty Vio
lation Are Guiltless—Sketch of Famous
“Stormy Petrel.”
Born 75 years ago in Ireland amidst the stress and storm of rebellion against
oppression, for the last 40 years “Mother”'Jones, as she is familiarly called, has
been the stormy petrel of all labor troubles and scenes of distress among the
working people of the United States.
True to her unerring instincts “Mother'' Jones arrived in San Antonio last
night and will remain here a week, speaking every evening at the Big Tent thea
ter, corner of Houston and Nacogdoches streets under the auspices of the Political
Refugee Defense League.
-1 Seen this morning at 710 Avenue D
’ Mother Jones, a bright, cheery person,
; with snow white hair, and wide open
i blue eyes and a busy, bustling air, an
nounced that she had just come from a
conference with President Taft at
') Washington and from the convention of
i the Western Federation of Miners,
• which has recently been held in Den
ver. As the petrel flies before the storm.
, so she hastened to San Antonio to lend
her assistance toward the freeing of
Jose M. Rangel and Tomas Serabia,
who are confined in the Bexar county
jail, awaiting a hearing before the
I United States commissioner on a charge
of violating the neutrality treaty be
tween the United States and Mexico.
Discusses Serabia Case.
“As far as I can learn no charges;
have been filed against Rangel and Se- ;
rabia. They have violated no laws of -
the United States, and except for three
I guns found on the premises, there ap-
I pears to be no excuse for their arrest.
I I daresay that in any judge’s house in
i San Antonio, or in Texas, could be
I found as many as three guns. The whole
thing is an international fight for the
I liberties of the -working class, and the
; American workmen are quick to realize
this. .
“When I speak Saturday evening I
shall tell the story of the kidnaping of I
Manuel Serabia. the brother of Tomas,
Serabia by the Mexican government
from Douglas. Ariz. I was in Douglas,
Ariz., working among the miners there
when he was kidnaped. At the time he
was taken he was working as a com
positor on the ‘lnternational, a paper
published in Douglas. He was arrested
in the afternoon by a constable at the
instigation of the Mexican consul, and
was placed in jail. That night he was
kidnaped and taken across the border
to Naco, and thence to Hermosillo, a |
two days’ ride strapped to a mule.
First Heard News.
“I was speaking that night, and
when the news got abroad, we tele
graphed the governor, and then the
president. The result, as you know,
was that Wheeler, a United States of
ficer, was sent down into Mexico and
brought back Serabia.”
Appealed to Washington.
Mother Jones’ mission to Washing
ton was in the interest of the Mexican
revolutionists who are in prison at Fort
Leavenworth, among whom are Guerra,
tue leader of the Las 5 acas uprising,
Silva, Arauja and Trevino. Mother
Jones is trying to get pardon for Silva,
who is dying of consumption in the fed
oral prison. She says that President
Taft received her cordially and assured '
her that he would have the matter
looked into by the board of pardons.
Mother Jones has spent 69 of her
75 years in the United States, and when
asked how she came to take up her
labor of forty years among the poor
and oppressed, she said: “I first began
to think of it after the great fire of
Chicago, when I saw all the suffering
and misery and learned that relief
which had been sent the distressed did
not reach the source for which it was
meant. Then I began to read aud thiuk,
12 PAGES
31 of some plan to relieve the suffering
i, । which I saw everywhere about me.”
! ' Forty Years a Fighter.
And for forty years this woman
; whose deep interest in the men for
i i whom she has labored has earned for
f her the title of “mother,” has gone
1 up and down from place to place, aid
' ing and counselling and cheering in her .
' bright way, men who battled for what ■
they deemed right and just deserts.;
“One thing,” avowed Mother Jones, I
' “I have always counselled order, and I
' in all my experience I have never had 1
any trouble, and sometimes I have I
worked where there have been 30,000;
I men out on a strike. I did not want to ।
see the men shot down, and I hope the |
time will come when the lead which
is now used for bullets will be used to
। make type to educate the masses.' ’
- Joan of Arc to Speak Too.
Assisting at the meeting which will
be held in the interest of the revolu
tionists at the Big Tent theater will be
Andrea Villareal, who is called the
Mexican Joan of Arc, and who is ex
pected home from Phoenix within the
next day or so. As a tribute to Mother
Jones, a club of Mexican women or
ganized by Andrea Villareal, for the
purpose of assisting the men in jail,
I will have seats on the platform with
i Mother Jones.
TRANS-MISSISSIPPI CONGRESS
CONIES 10 SAN ANTONIO IN 1910
“Got everything in sight. Trans-Mississippi Congress meets in San Antonio.
Col. Ike T. Pryor elected president and N. 8. Graham of the Americ
and Trust companv, treasurer.”
That's the wav J. H. Kirkpatrick announces what happened at last night s
session of the Trans Mississippi Congress at Denver in a special
Light and Gazette. You see Mr. Kirkpatrick is modest and doesn t tell about
the great oratorical fight he put up to land all that for the Alamo City.
Reno. Nev., Sioux Citv, lowa, and St. Louis were all in the contest for the
next meeting and had delegations on the ground to set forth their advantages.
The only trouble with those delegations was that there wasn t a Kirkpatrick
omong them. When the silver-tongued orator from San Antonio got busy witk
the congress there wasn't a show for the other three cities and they quickly
realized it. One vote was taken, San Antonio had an overwhelming lead and then
it was made unanimous.
When Mr. Kirkpatrick had finished telling about the glories of Southwest
Texas in general and San Antonio in particular, there was not a man among
the 2500 delegates present not aching to pay San Antonio a visit. Then just to
clinch the argument, Col. Ike T. Pryor, to whose energy in getting the movement
started for landing the convention a big share of the credit is due. rose to his
feet and corroborated all that Mr. Kirkpatrick had said. That settled it and San
Antonio won.
MAY BE FIGHT ON
FOREST CONTROVERSY
Associated Press.
Denver, Aug. 20. —The trans-Missis*
sippi congress today will in all proba
bility engage in its first debate over
the forest controversy if there is to be
a fight occasioned by the resolution
offered by former United States Sen
ator Patterson of ‘.olorado yesterday.
Patterson’s resolution called for an un
MI ICE CREW
'•Tastes Lika Mora."
At fountains. Orders for banquets, ra
ceptions, lodges club affairs and lam.,
trade a specialty.
Creamery Dairy Co. Phones 871
PRICE: FIVE CENTS
Stories of Harriman’s
Health Upsets Stock
Brokers.
SECRETARY TALKS
Denies Railroad King
Is Worse-Many Other
Securities Affected.
GOULDS OWN T. & P.
Associated Press.
NEW YORK, AUG. 2b.—THE MAR
KET WAS KEPT IN A RATHEB NER
VOUS STATE ALL DAY BY THE
FREQUENT WIDE FLUCTUATIONS
IN UNION PACIFIC. THAT STOCK
BROKE 3 1-4 BELOW WHERE IT
LEFT OFF YESTERDAY, BUT BUP
.ORT AND SOME DEMAND FROM
SHORT INTERESTS CAUSED A
BRISK RALLY AFTERWARDS
WHICH CARRIED MANY STOCKS
UP FROM 2 TO 2 1-2 ABOVE THE
LOW PRICES OF THE DAY.
New York. Aug. 20. —Another spasm
of liquidation came over the stock mar
ket in the first hour today on enor
mous dealings. Prices on the more ac
tive issues, such as Harriman stocks,
Reading, Illinois Central, United States .
Steel and American Smelting declined
I from two to three points or more. Ex-
I citement on the floor of the exchange
was intense at time and stocks wero
thrown over at whatever price they
would bring. Aside from further rumors
regarding the health of Harriman no
news was offered in explanation of the
i sensational decline. Low prices of the
i morning effected losses ranging from
5 to 15 points below the high level of
I last Monday morning.
Says Hamman Is All Bight.
’' Harriman’s return from his European
•; trip at this time, though earlier than
I' expected, is simply to admit of his ob
, taining in his own home amidst com
| forts and conveniences impossible to
I secure in European hotels, the rest he
j needs after the treatment abroad, ao-
I cording to Alexander Miller. secretary
of the Union Pacific and Southern Pa
cific railroads, who has been abroad
with Harriman. Millar arrived today on
the steamer Mauretania.
“Harriman’s health is by no means
bad and will improve on this side,’’
said Millar. “I do not think he will
take any verv prominent part in busi
ness for a few weeks after his arrival
here.”
SAYS HARRIMAN
DOES NOT OWN T. & F.
Special Dispatch.
Fort Worth, Tex., Aug. 20.—A report
published in morning papers that E. H.
Harriman had secured control of the
Texas & Pacific from the Gould family
through recent heavy purchases of
stock of that road is emphatically de
nied by an official representative of
the Goulds. In response to a telegram
sent bv the Texas News Service, Ed
ward T.* Jeffery of New York, presi
dent of the Denver & Rio Grande and
in general charge of all the Gould in
terests. including the Texas & Pacific,
declared the rumor was entirely with
out foundation.
derstanding regarding the boundaries
of the forest preserves. It set out that
inasmuch as Pinchot himself declared
that much agricultural land was includ
ed in the forest preserves it is not nec
essary to enact new laws to enable the
president to open agricultural lands for
, entry. Patterson in his remarks follow
ing the resolution, declared the presi
' dent now had power to slip the bonds
from these farm lands and he wants
the trans-Mississippi congress to urjs
, such action.

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