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San Antonio light and gazette. [volume] (San Antonio, Tex.) 1909-1911, September 01, 1909, Image 1

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PASTEURIZED MILK AND CREAM
Twelve Wa«oaa to Maka D*llTerlM to
AU Parts of the City.
Creamery Dairy Co. Phones 871
VOLUME 29, No. 225
North Pole Discovered April 21, 1908, And No One Knewlt Until Today
DEAD WOMAN
CAME FROM
LOUISIANA
Mrs. Albert Banta Was Raised
In Refinement In City
of Shreveport.
FIRST HUSBAND PROMINENT
He Is John R. Phipps, Former
Associate of Senator Mur
phy J. Foster.
WERE MARRIED IN HOUMA
Maiden Name Was Miss Susie
Freeman —Cause of Death
Not Yet Cleared.
Behind the finding ot' the decomposed
body of Mrs. Albert Banta behind a
elump,of bushes in Brackenridge park
last Saturday, it has been discovered,
lies a story of romance and of a life
replete with human interest-
The wasted and decomposed corpse
found by officers after the mysterious
telephone call in a male voice telling
headquarters where the body would be
found was once one of the most beauti
ful girls in Louisiana, her childhood
home.
Previous to her marriage with Albert
Banta, the woman was the wife of John
R.. Phipps, ten years ago the most con
spicuous political figure in the south.
Associated with Murphy J. Foster,
Phipps led the fight of 1898-9 against
the Louisiana lottery system.
Susie Freeman Her Maiden Name.
It was at this time that he met and
married Susie Freeman, which was the
maiden name of the woman who was
found dead in Brackenridge park. They
were married in Houma. Louisiana, and
were divorced there a few years later.
Phipps has since suffered a stroke of
paralysis, but is still holding a political
job in Louisiana.
Mrs. Banta was raised in Shreveport.
After leaving Houma she came to
Timpson, Texas, which was her home
the greater part of the time since. A
brother follows the trade of barber in
Fort Worth.
Met Old Acquaintance Here.
The only person, it is believed, who
ever recognized in Mrs. Banta in San
Antonio, the former social leader and
beautiful wife of Senator Phipps, was
Thos. S. Longino, a local real estate
man, who knew her years ago in her
native state.
Mr. Longino states that a few weeks
ago she came up to him on the street
and, stretching out her hand, said, “Mr.
Longino, don’t you know me!”
He responded that he did not, and
her reply was, “I’m Susie Freeman that
used to be Mrs. John R. Phipps, whom
von knew baek in Houma, Louisiana.”
She conversed with him some time
and told him she was in want. He gave
her a small sum of money.
It is thought possible that the iden
tity of Mrs. Banta can be linked with
a woman who made a habit of standing
on the Crockett street bridge for hours
at a time and who often asked passers
by for alms.
Scouts Suicide Theory.
Racked with mental anguish as well
as being in great physical torture, Al
bert Banta lies in bed at the home of
bis mother, 606 Avenue E, and thinks
of nothing but his wife’s mysterious
death.
“I know Susie too well to consider
suicide for a moment,” said he when
visited by a Light and Gazette reporter
at 1 o’clock this afternoon. “It is a
case of murder, I am confident of
that. ’ ’ i
Banta is a man or admirable nerve.
Though hopelessly crippled, the stumps
of both legs cut off just above the knees
only a few weeks ago, having hardly
ceased to bleed, he lies on bis bed plan
ning the future and placing first of al!
in importance the ferreting out of the
circumstances of his wife's death.
“Though we were no longer living
together as man and wife, yet she was
my wife and my first impulse is to bring
about justice if I can. ” he declared as,
by the leverage of his muscular arms
he raised himself to a sitting posture
above his stumps. “She had her faults.
She was a morphine fiend, though how
she became addicted to the dreadful
habit I never knew, yet she was a
woman of refinement and good at heart.
No one can ever make me believe she
suicided. ”
Traveling 600 miles from El Paso as
fast as he could, Banta’s first step after
getting here was to hire a private de
tective, with whom he spent the first
day riding around in a buggy. The
strain of the long trip on the train and
the jar of riding in the vehicle was
enough to break down almost any man.
yet Banta stood this for 12 hours, fired
b his zeal, then almost collapsed and
was forced to go to bed. His first acts
SAN ANTONIO LIGHT
AND GAZETTE
AMERICAN EXPLORER FINDS NORTH POLE
FRISCO RUNS FIRST
TRAIN TO NEW ORLEANS
Through Passenger Service Be
tween Louisiana City and
Houston Inaugurated.
Associated Press.
New Orleans, La., Sept. I.—Today
marked the entrance of the Rock Island-
Frisco lines into New Orleans and the
establishment of through passenger serv
ice between New Orleans and Houston,
Texas. The first train for New Orleans
left Houston at 8 a. m. and the first
train for Houston left New Orleans at
6:10 a. m. Connections will be made at
intermediate points for St. Louis, Kan
sas City and other cities in the middle
west.
TORONTO HAS
BIG BLAZE
Associated Press.
Toronto, Sept. I.—The parliament i
buildings are on fire. The roof of the
west wing has fallen and the library is
now in flames. The entire contents, con
sisting of upwards of 100,000 volumes,
will doubtless be destroyed. At 3 >
o’clock the fire was still raging and |
not under control.
FATHER TRIES TO
SUICIDE ALSO,
Associated Press.
Shreveport, Sept. 1. —After his son.
Marshall Nelson, had committed suicide
by drinking carbolic acid, J. M. Nelson, (
the father, attempted to end his life by
cutting his throat with a razor at
, Stonewall, a small town near here, late
I yesterday.
SOCIALIST WRITER
IS STRICKEN
Associated Press.
Nashville. Tenn., Sept. 1. —Seth Mc-
Callen, a noted socialist writer, who is
better known in the literary world as
Dick Maples, and editor of the Nation
al Ripsaw of St. Louis, was stricken
with paralysis at his country home here
last night. His entire right side is par-1
alyzed.
CONTRACT IS LET.
Special Dispatch. .
Austin, Tex., Sept. 1. —State Health
Officer Brumby returned today from 1
various points. He announced that the
contract for repairing damage done to
the Galveston quarantine station at
Galveston by the recent stonn, was
awarded to R. C. Gracey. The contract
price was $lB,OOO, wnic'a is $5OOO less
than the original bid.
when he gets up, he declares, will be to
continue his investigations.
Death Certificate Filed.
Coroner Ben Fisk today filed with the
city health officers the death certificate
of Mrs. Banta. In it the statement
was made that it was impossible to de
termine the causes that produced death.
12 PAGES
A STORY WITHOUT WORDS
ADMIRAL MELVILLE
DISCREDITS REPORT
Says Finding of. Pole Would
Put End to Fad and Would
Be of Scientific Value.
Associated Press.
Philadelphia, Sept. 1. —Admiral Mel
ville, U. S. N. (retired), who conducted
several expeditions into the Arctic re
gions, is inclined to discredit the re
port from Copenhagen that the north
pole had been discovered by Cook. “I
! did not know Cook had an outfit avail
able for that purpose,” he said, “and
■ I do not think the report can be true.
I DrA Cook has been wandering in those
j parfs for some time. It is just proba
ble that the story emanated from some
j Danish skipper who returned from the
north.”
When asked what would be the value
of the discovery, if the authenticity of
the report was confirmed. Melville said:
“For one thing, it would put on end
to the Arctic fad. The only use to
which the discovery could be put would
be of a scientific nature. If the exact
location of the pole has been found it
will be possible to send a party of
scientists there and by erecting a pen
dulum and measuring its movement and
later removing the same pendulum to
the equator for some measurement there
the exact weight of the earth could be
computed. The attraction of the earth
to heavenly bodies, and vice versa,
would also be thereby determined.”
BANK CHARTER IS
APPROVED BY BOARD
Special Diepatch.
Austin, Tex., Sept. I.—The state
banking board met today and passed
upon its first application for approval
of a bank charter. The board approved
the charter of the First State bank of
Honey Grove, subject to verification by
one of the state bank examiners. Com
missioner Love said this would be the
step followed in the case of every ap
plication for organization of state
banks.

FALL FROM HORSE FATAL.
Special Dispatch.
EI Paso. Tex., Sept. I.—Stratford
Vincent, aged 18 years, son of W. H.
Vincent, a prominent stoekman of Hans
ford county, was killed today when a
horse threw him. His neck was broken.
Flocal weather]
CFor San Antonio and vicinity,
tonight and Thursday:
L Partly cloudy weather.
The maximum temperature
for the 24 hours ending at 8
o'clock this morning was 92 de
grees and the minimum was 72
degrees.
U Comparative temperatures for
this year and last:
1908 1909
PA 4 a. tn 73 7S
B I 0 a. m.-j.. 72 75
8 a. m 74 76
YlO a. ni 81 80
12 noon., 87 86
1 p. m 89 91
SAN ANTONIO. TEXAS, WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER. 1 1909.
TELEGRAM SAYS
HE REACHED II
APRIL 21,1908
Dr. Cook Is on Board Danish
Steamer From Which the
Message Was Received.
ON HIS WAY TO DENMARK
Telegram Is Sent By Greenland
Official Who Was a Pas
senger on the Boat.
STORY HAS BEEN VERIFIED
Esquimaux of Cape York Con
firm the Story of Discoverer's
Trip to Edge of the Earth.
Associated Press.
Copenhagen. Sept. I.—Dr. Cook, an
American explorer, reached the North
Pole April 21, 1908, according to a tel
egram just received at the colonial of
fice here.
Dr. Cook is on board the Danish gov
ernment steamer Hans Egede, which
passed Lerwick. Shetland Islands, at
noon today, en route for Denmark. The
telegram announcing Dr. Cook’s
achievement was sent by a Greenland
official on board the steamer and read
as follows:
“We have on board the American
traveler, Dr. Cook, who reached the
North Pole April 21, 1908. Dr. Cook
arrived at Upernivik, the northernmost
Danish settlement in Greenland, on an
island off the west coast, in May, 1909,
from Cape York (in the northwest part
of Greenland on Baffin Bay).
“Esquimaux of Cape York confirm
Cook’s story of his journey.’’
Dr Frederick Cook, accompanied by
a Norwegian, left Etah, Greenland,
March 3, 1908, taking with him eight
Esquimaux, four sleds and twelve dog
teams. He was to make his way through
Ellesmere Island. Dr. Cook lives in
Brooklyn. . . .
For years Dr. Cook has given his at
tention to Arctie exploration and in
1891 he was surgeon of the Peary Arctic
expedition, and in 1*97-99 was surgeon
of the Belgian Arctic expedition. He
received numerous decorations from
geological societies in Europe for his
research and writings in the polar fields.

NEWS BRINGS JOY
TO WASHINGTON
Associated Press.
Washington, Sept. 1 -Officials of the
National Geographies society in th.s
citv today are greatly elated at the
news of the reported success of Dr.
Cook in discovering the North 1 ole.
FIRST CARLOAD OF PROVISIONS GOES
10 STARVING MULTITUDES AT MONTEREY
IK. ME HEU fOS
SAHITY DAMNATION
MRS. ALICE WEBB DUKE
Former Beautiful Wife of To
bacco Millionaire Is Now a
Physical Wreck.
Associated Press.
Chicago, Sept. I.—ln the unkempt,
illusion haunted woman whose feverish
lips answered to the name of Alice
Webb Duke, in Judge Gimmell’s court
here today there was little to remini
the spectators of the beautiful former
wife of Brodie Duke, the millionaire
tobacco man.
Mrs. Duke was arrested last nighb
charged with having failed to pay a
$4O automobile bill. In her cell last
night she sang snatches from grand
opera for hours. Today Judge Gimmell,
in the statement of a physician that
the defendant was insane held her for
examination in the county court as io
her mental state.
PROSPEROUS SEASON
IS THE PREDICTION
Everything predicts a prosperous
season in this part of the state and San
Antonio seems due to come in for its
full share, declares Thomas L. Peacock,
secretary of the San Antonio Credit
Men’s association.
“We are receiving lots of inquir
ies,’’ said Mr. Peacock today. “The
merchants and retail trade is begin
ning to buy fall stuff. This is some
what early and the movement presages
a heavy business for fall.”
BANANA PEEL IS
NEARLY CAUSE OF DEATH
Associated Press. I
Jacksonville, Tex., Sept. i.—Newt.
Jordan of this city narrowly escaped
death under the wheels of an Interna
tional & Great Northern passenger train
last night. While getting off the train
he slipped on a banana peeling. His
finger was cut off, his leg badly bruised,
ahd he suffered other injuries. He was
taken to a hospital here.
BODY OF PRESSMAN
FOUND ON RANCH
Associated Press. *
Ei Paso. Tex., Sept. I.—The body of
a man believed to have been Charles
Payne, a pressfflhn of Fort orth. *vas
found today on a ranch near Carizozo,
N M. The’body was in a state of de
composition. Papers in his pocket
served to identify him.
-.— -
Some time ago the National Geographic
society officers say Cook, it was feared,
had been lost on a daring trip in search
of the pole. No news had been received
from him and his friends reluctantly
gave up hope of ever hearing from him
again. In fact a relief expedition was
fitted out and sent into the frozen north
in the hope of finding the explorer dead
or alive.*
BROOKLYN MAN '
HEARS FROM COOK
Associated Press.
New York, Sept. I.—Dr. R. T. Dav id
son of Brooklyn, a personal friend of
Dr. Cook, received a cablegram from
Cook today saying Ae was well and his
expedition had been a success. The
message, which was dated at Lerwick,
Shetland Islands, did not say whether
the explorer had reached the pole.
12 PAGES
Second Car Will Be Filled Early To
* morrow-Food for Hundreds
Soon at Monterey.
DOZENS AID WORK OF RELIEF.
Work of Gathering Provisions and Money for
Flood Sufferers Goes on With Enthusias
tic Swing.
The first carload of provisions and clothing donated by citizens
of San Antonio, for the flood sufferers at Monterey, will be sealed
at 5 o'clock this afternoon and leave at 9 o’clock tonight over the
International & Great Northern railroad.
Other cars will follow tomorrow, just as soon as a sufficient
amount of supplies is received. It had been the plan to send a relief
train of several cars, but the opening of railroad traffic between
Monterey and Laredo having come earlier than anticipated, and on
account of the appealing conditions in the stricken city, it was de
cided to ship the first carload as soon as it could be filled. ,
The International & Great Northern railroad has agreed to car
ry free all provisions and clothing sent for distributioh among the
flood sufferers. The car was pulled out on to the switch this morn
ing and by noon it was almost filled. It was filled at 4 o’clock this
afternoon and there will be half a ear of supplies left to be loaded
in the second ear tomorrow.
A local man will go with the car tonight and see that the pro
visions are delivered to Consul General Hanna at Monterey, who in
turn will see that the relief committee there receives the San An
tonio offering.
San Antonians are enthusiastically at work in the collection of
food for the starving people of Monterey. The noble women of this
I city held a meeting this morning and will meet again at 9:30 o'clock
tomorrow morning at the relief station in the Chandler building.
They have perfected organization which is causing a large collection
of food and clothing. *
• The milk supply has run short at Monterey and many children
are famishing for want of nourishment. Appeal is made for dona
tions of condensed milk.
The collection of donations will continue. They will be received
at the relief station. If you have donations and cannot deliver them
telephone the Light and Gazette.
All this morning three wagons were busy collecting donations
from people who telephoned the Light and Gazette that they were
ready for the wagon to call, and in dozen of poor homes clothing,
food and money were waiting. The story of a day with a relief serv
ice wagon would reveal a depth of sympathy unsuspected by the
general public.
SAYS DEATH LIST AT
MONTEREY IS 10,000
Special Dispatch.
LAREDO, Tex., Sept. I.—A message received here today
from a prominent and reliable Monterey business man says
that the list of dead from the recent flood, exposure and fall
ing buildings will reach 10.000. Twelve hundred bodies have
been recovered.
WHAT THE FIRST
CAR CONTAINS
Within a few hours the first carload
of supplies contributed by the people
of San Antonio to the flood victims at
Monterey will be on its way *o the
border with every probability of reach
ing the stricken city early tomorrow
morning. This is what the first car
contains.
157 sacks flour.
3 sacks onions.
2 sacks rice.
25 eases condensed milk.
1 ease canned hominy.
2 eases mixed groceries.
120 pounds lard.
2 sacks corn.
1 box soap.
1 case dry goods.
5 gallons vinegar.
1 bundle blankets.
66 sides bacon.
8 bags potatoes.
2 eases canned goods.
15 barrels bread.
500 pounds coffee.
1 case macaroni.
2 cases package rice.
27 sacks beans.
144 sacks corn meal.
51 bundles clothing. 1
FOR OTHER MONTEREY NEWS SEE PAGE ’
WET ICE CHEMI
"Tastes Like Mors."
At fountains. Orders for banquets re
ceptions. lodges, club affairs aud tania
trade a specialty.
Creamery Dairy Co, Phones 871 I
PRICE: FIVE CENTS
4 boxes clothing.
1 barrel clothing.
The Mexican societies of San Antonio
yesterday raised $2OO, which was placed
in the hands of Dr. Fernandez for the
purpose of buying supplies and these
will go forward with the above ear,
space being reserved during loading for
these provisions. Dr. Fernandez’s sup
plies, not included in the above list,
comprises:
10 boxes crackers.
10 sacks potatoes.
10 sacks beans.
4 sacks riee.
1 ease baking powder.
1 ease package coffee.
4 barrels flour.
10 cases sardines.
5 sacks sugar.
A second car is being loaded by the
Light and Gazette this afternoon and
will go out early tomorrow.
At 11 o’clock this morning the Mer
chants’ Transfer company sent one of
their big four horse floats to
headquarters for the supplies there.
This load was weighed at the station
and tipped the scales at 8300 pounds.

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