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San Antonio light and gazette. [volume] (San Antonio, Tex.) 1909-1911, September 02, 1909, Image 1

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PASTEURIZED MILK UNO CREED
Twelve W*«ou to Kako DeUverlM to
AU Varto Of th* City.
Creamery Dairy Co. Phones 871
VOLUME 29, No. 226
First Picturesof Appalling Flood That Cost 5000 Lives at Monterey, Mexico
SECOND
CAR TODAY
The Light and Gazette’s first car of
provisions and clothing for the flood
sufferers at Monterey left at 9 o’clock
last night over the International &
Great Northern and is expected to ar
rive at its destination this evening.
The Light and Gazette will send its
second car to the stricken city tonight,
leaving San fntonio at 9 o'clock. Two
carloads of food and clothing collected
by the Light and Gazette in two days
show how quickly the charitable people
of San Antonio answered the Light and
Gazette’s appeal for aid for the flood
sufferers. «
A half hour after the first car was
loaded yesterday afternoon donations
continued to pour into the relief station
in the Chandler building and before
dark nearly a half car had been re
ceived. Early this morning more dona
tions were received and by noon the
supplies on hand added to the corn
purchased with relief funds were near
ly sufficient for filling a car. The
goods will be transferred to the Inter
national & Great Northern depot this
afternoon by a large transfer wogan,
the services of which is given free of
charge by the Carter & Mullaly Trans
fer company.
The donations come from all classes
of citizens, the plan of the Light and
Gazette to send relief having met with
universal approval.
Donations will continue to be receiv
ed at the Light and Gazette’s relief
station tomorrow.
A special collection will be taken at
al) the morning services in St. Mary’s
church for the benefit of the Monterey
luffcrers.
CONTENTS OF SECOND RELIEF CAR
The Light and Gazette's second car,
which will leave at 9 o’clock tonight
over the International & Great North
ern for Monterey, will be filled to its
capacity with a great variety of food
supplies. It will contain the follow
ing:
Nearly 900 pounds of flour.
Ten cases condensed milk.
225 sacks corn.
Sack potatoes.
NEW TERRITORY
BELONGS TO U. S.
Associated Press.
St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 2.—A1l new ter
ritory discovered by Dr. Cook when he
reached the North Pole belongs to the
United States by right of discovery, ac
cording to Rev. Charropin, 8. J., pro
fessor of astronomy at St. Louis uni
versity. Father Charropin today said
that Cook’s statements would be ac
cepted by scientists who attempt to
confirm them.
GERMAN YACHT WINS
Associated Pres*.
Marblehead, Sept. 2. —The German
yacht Hevella won the third race for
Sender yachts today in an exciting
contest.
SAN ANTONIO LIGHT
| AND GAZETTE
A portion of the ruined district. Many bodies of the drowned found lodgment here.
+++++++++++++++*++
♦ ♦
+ CAR TO KEACH 4>
+ MONTEREY TONIGHT. ♦
+ ♦
♦ Special Dispatch. *
♦ Laredo, Tex., Sept. 2. —“Our car ♦
♦ of supplies for the flood sufferers ♦
♦ at .Monterey will be in the strick- ♦
4- en city tonight, barring accidents. ♦
♦ I just saw it taken to the other 4-
4> side of the river and the goods ❖
♦ were admitted free of duty and 4-
♦ without question, thanks to the ♦
♦ good offices of Francisco Vizcaya, 4-
4- customs agent for the National 4>
4» railroads, and M. Azcarraga, gov- •>
4> ernment inspector, who made her- •>
4- culean efforts to avoid the red ❖
4- tape of weighing, etc. 4-
4- “The car got in here at 74-
4- o’clock this morning and went out 4>
4- again just a little after 1 o’clock 4-
4- this afternoon, which in the opin- 4>
4- ion of Laredo people, is “going •>
4- some.’’ H. W. BOONE. 4-
4- 4-
4- The above telegram was receiv- •>
•> ed by The Light and Gazette this •>
4- afternoon from the special repre- 4-
4- sentative of the paper sent to
4- Monterey with the first ear of 4-
4- supplies for the relief of the flood 4-
v sufferers. Another telegram was •>
♦ received by The Light and Ga- 4-
4- zette from M. Azcarraga, collec- 4>
4- tor of customs at Nuevo Laredo, 4>
4- which said: “Your cars of pro- 4-
4- visjons for Monterey sufferers 4-
4- will be admitted free of duty and ♦
4- forwarded immediately.” *
4> *
4- 4- 4- 4- 4- 4- 4- 4- 4- 4- 4- ■» 4- 4 4- ❖ 4-4-
400 pounds meal.
Case salmon.
Sack rice.
Thirteen sacks onions.
Three cases canned meats.
Four barrels bread.
Sack shoes.
Box clothing, bundle clothes.
Five boxes macaroni.
Box miscellaneous canned goods
Ten cases clothing.
Six cases provisions.
CANYON CITY
GETS NORMAL
Special Dispatch.
Austin, Tex., Sept. 2.—Canyon City
was selected this morning for the site
of the West Texas Normal after a long
struggle to reach a decision. Its bid
of $lOl,OOO is in land and buildings
and the choice was unanimous. Lieut.
Gov. Davidson and Senator Hudspeth
deny a division occurred over San An
gelo because of influence exercised by
the governor. They deny San Angelo
was discussed.
Council to Hold Short Meeting—Be
cause o. the celebration of Labor Day,
the city council will hold only an ad
journed meeting next Monday, the
mayor and councilmen having accepted :
the invitation to participate in the fes
tivities.
12 PAGES
Mexico's Consul Gives Thanks
To the people of San Antonio:
In the n%me of my Government, whom I have
the honor to represent in your city, I beg to express
its most heartfelt gratitude for your spontaneous,
prompt and generous assistance to the flood stricken
city of Monterey.
When you sent relief to Galveston and San Fran
cisco in the hour of their great distress you were re
sponding to an appeal for help from your own coun
trymen, but in heeding the cry of grief and horror
from Monterey you breathed that spirit of brotherhood
that is world-wide, that knows no international lines
and calls the world kin.
Your assistance was quick, substantial and abund
ant, and this noble act of philanthropy Mexico and
Mexicans will never forget.
Respectfully,
ENRIQUE ORNELAS,
Consul of Mexico.
ESTIMATE ON
COTTON CROP
ONLY 63.7
Associated Press.
Washington, Sept. 2.—The crop esti
mating board of the department of ag
riculture in its bulletin today estimates
the average condition of the cotton crop
on August 25 was 63.7 per cent normal
as compared with 76.1 per cent on Au
gust 25, 1908; 72.7 on August 25, 1907,
and 73.6 as the average for the past ten
years on August 25.
MR. HARRIMAN IS
IMPROVING DAILY
In Communication With New
York Offices Today and
Statement Is Made.
Associated Pres*.
New York. Sept. 2. —E. H. Harriman,
who is resting at his home in Arden
after treatment at the German baths,
was in communication with his office
in this citv today. It is stated his con
dition is improving daily.
[LOCAL WEATHER
For San Antonio and vicinity,
F tonight and Friday:
Fair.
The maximum temperature
for the 24 hours ending at 8
, o'clock this morning was 92 de
jk grees and the minimum was 72
Ck degrees.
Comparative temperatures tor
I this year and last:
1908 1909
4 a. m...... 72 75
« a. m 70 74
8 a. m 79 75
10 a ton 87 77
IV 12 noon 91 82
A u. m 92 90
SAN ANTONIO. TEXAS. THURSDAY. SEPTEMBER. 2 1909.
To People of San Antonio
JUDGE PENN
IS DYING
AT AUSTIN
Special Dispatch.
Austin, Tex., Sept. 2.—Judge R. L.
Penn, attorney for Waters Pierce and
the Galveston Chamber of Commerce,
was stricken with pararlysis last night
; and today is in a critical condition. He
■ spent yesterday at his office working
I as usual in apparently good health.
Judge Penn was formerly judge of
the Twenty sixth district court and is
one of the most prominent members of
the State Bar association.
AUTO OVERTURNS,
FOUR ARE INJURED
Serious injuries were sustained bv
four young men of San Antonio when
an automobile turned turtle at 5 o’clock
yesterday afternoon on the Mission
loop, just porth of Berg's Mill, and
while the machine was spinning over
the roadway at a speed estimated to
have been between 25 and 30 miles an
hour.
Frank B. Grice, owner of the auto
mobile. sustained a fracture of the left
arm between the shoulder and the el
bow; Ellis Chaney, suffered severe in
juries’to his spine, while Edward Dwyer
Jr. and K. Matthews, the chauffeur,
were painfullv bruised about the body.
Victims of the accident were reported
resting easy today.
COURT CLEARS
RAYMOND HITCHCOCK
Associated Press.
New York, Sept. 2. —Raymond Hitch
oock, the comedian, was given a elean
bill on criminal court records today
when the court of general sessions dis
missed the remaining four indictments
charging misconduct.
Ip the large building shown in the distance probably fifty peqple had taken refuge. The rising waters la
swept it and all the surrounding buildings to destruction and all were lost.
EYE WITNESS TELLS VIVID STORY
OF WHAT HE SAW IN MONTERh
Death List Cannot Yet Be Accurately Estimated— Home
less Cry Aloud for Food While Wander
ing the Streets.
THOUSANDS ARE SLEEPING IN RAIN SOAKED ROADS
Saw One Man Shoot Wife Just As Waves Engulfed
Entire Family—2s Go to Death From One
Tree in Path of Flood.
Human beings have never witnessed more terrible or more pathetic scenes of suffering than now
prevail in Monterey, Mexico, and over a large portion of the state of Nuevo Leon, dependent upon that
great city Yor its food supply.
More than twenty thousand are homeless. The temperature, following the inundation fell* remark
ably low for that section of Mexico, and the thousands, clad only in their rain drenched garments,
stand alxmt the streets during the day, shivering and miserable, dreading the coming of night when
they must seek, many of them at least, beds in the street from which the water has not receded.
Saturday morning showed the most suffering. Thousands of people crowded into the city hall
and Zaragoza and Hidalgo plazas while the streets leading from the river were crowded with them. Few
were clad in more than their night clothes and these were wet through and through.
O'REILLY BEERS
Il SLEEPER, HO.
He and Aransas Take Needed
Rest After Traveling For
ty-six Miles In a Day.
BY E. S. O’REILLY.
Special Dispatch.
Sleeper, Mo., Sept. 2.—1 slepL a part
of the night in Sleeper and will resume
my journey this afternoon, having stop
ped here for rest needed by both my
self and Aransas. I traveled forty-six
miles yesterday. Nothing of exciting
interest has occurred since my last wire.
I have been traveling at night and meet
but frew people.
O’REILLY ADVERTISED
IN EASTERN CITIES
“O’Reilly’s ride to Washington is
■ the greatest advertisement San Antonio
lever secured,” declares Fred Harvey,
a former San Antonio newspaper man,
who is now employed by the Associated
Press in New York City, writing to
the secretary of the Chamber of Com
merce.
An exeerpt from Mr. Harvey’s let
ter follows:
“I admire the enterprise of San An
tonio and the Light and Gazette in
sending O’Reilly as a eowboy messen
ger to Washington.
“The Sunday after the start the Her
aid ran a double column picture and
on the Monday following the Tribune
commented editorially on it. The good,
old ‘A. P. ’ carried some 20U words this
far east and that’s what I call going
some. The Journal loped in with a
picture the other evening, and in all
I have seen no less than eight or ten
stories on the trip: it’s making him
famous.”
12 PAGES
(BY H. H. SHELTON)
’ A stiff cold breeze was blowing from the north and this struck
to the very marrow of the people need to nothing but a sun-kissed
climate. Women were carrying one and two crying children in their
arms while tagging to their skirts were others of all ages. Many of
them had been already without food twelve to twenty-four hours,
and fowl could not lie obtained. The citizens of Monterey were
doing all in their power, but with many of them with scant food to
supply their own families it was hard to find supplies to feed 20,000
hungry mortals.
Saturday night came with the electric light still cut off. The
municipal palace is a great square building, on one side of which is
Hidalgo plaza and on the other is Zaragoza plaza. Here the peo
ple come for shelter. The sidewalks beneath the portals are packed
as close as humans could pack. Others sought refuge in the open
plazas. Kain was falling in great sheets and gusts of wind threw
it in every direction. There was not a dry spot to be found and
thousands of people spent the night in this miserable oendition. hun
gry, cold and sorrowing for scarcely one of that great crowd was
without a death among the family or in that of near relatives.
The work of organizing the fight began on Sunday,.but despite
every effort many had to go hungry. The streets swarmed with des
titute and parentless children begging for “tin centavo," and while
hundred of pennies were dropped into the little outstretched hands
it was valueless for food could not be bought.
Driven frantic by hunger men several
times invaded the market portion of the
town, which had been flooded and en
tered the meat markets and vegetable
stalls. From these were taken meat
and rotting vegetables. The starving
people fell upon the stuff with avidity
and devoured every scrap. FeaAng that
the eating of such food might cause an
epidemic of sickness police were put to
guarding these.
To provide the needed shelter the
churches and the large warehouses were
thrown open, but still this could not
house the people and many are yet
sleeping in the streets.
As soon as organized relief could
provide a way great tables were placed
in the streets to feed the hungry and
to keep the starving people away hun
dreds of police were kept on guard, but
despite that many tables were rushed bv
the famishing, s'o eager were they to
get food and so erazed were they by
hunger.
By Sunday night, however, probably
all had been at least partially fed, but
by that time the generous people of
FOR OTHER MONTEREY NEWS SEE PAGES 5 AND 11
VEIVH ICE CSEIM
“Tastes Like More.”
At fountains. Orders for banquet* re
ceptions. lodges c:ub atlalra aud un
trade a specialtv.
Creamery dairy Co. Phones 871
PRICE: FIVE CENTS
Monterey were very short of supplies
and only a small portion of beaus an!
one tortilla could be supplied to each
person. Great difficulty was found in
supplying it to sueh a mob of hungry
and frightened people.
Even with train service established
the city is in great need of food. Money
is necessary, but food is more necessary.
Supplies cannot be easily secured aui
funds invested in beans, cornmeal, flour
and such necessities will be even more
greatly relished.
In order to insure the citizens of
Monterey, not affected by the flood,
from sufffering and to make the food
supply go as far as possible, all mer
chants voluntarily put on a limit to the
amount that would be sold to any one
person. One pound of sugar, half a
pound of cotfee. twenty-five pounds of
flour, half a pound of rtee, ete., was all
that anyone could secure for love >r
money. The price was kept at the ol I
figures.
Wednesday, when the first train left,
(Continued on Page 5.)

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