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San Antonio light and gazette. [volume] (San Antonio, Tex.) 1909-1911, September 20, 1909, Image 10

Image and text provided by University of North Texas; Denton, TX

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86090238/1909-09-20/ed-1/seq-10/

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10
I SALE ® DULLNIG STOCKI
IS A RECORD BREAKER
j FOR ATTENDANCE OF EAGER SHOPPERS TO TAKE ADVANTAGE I
I OF THE TREMENDOUS SLAUGHTER OF THIS IMMENSE STOCK I
g Long before the doors were thrown open this morning the crowd was on hand patiently waiting I
| to get their share of the bargains advertised, well knowing that they would be fully repaid by taking I
I advantage of the big reductions made. Throughout the entire day the store was filled to its I
| capacity and crowds were waiting continually on the outside for an opportunity to get in. I
I DON’T DELAY I
I Come Tomorrow and Participate in This Great Bargain Event. The Savings Are Enormous. I
| DALKOWITZ BROS. &N. BECKER
RAIN PUIS DAm
ON BIG K. C. PICNIC
Grounds at Landa's Park Are
Flooded — Train Runs
Through Hail Storm.
The joint pienic given yesterday at
New Braunfels by the Knights of Col
umbus of Taylor, Austin and San An
tonio was spoiled by rain. The morn
ing trains reaching Landa’s park from
the three points named had large num
bers of Knights, with their friends, on
board and the prospects for fair
weather were bright and a good time
was anticipated by all. Shortly after
12 o’clock, however, a heavy rain began
to fall and spoiled the sport for the
day. The rain continued until nearly 5
o’clock in the afternoon and the ma
jority of the excursionists remained in
the coaches, or went in to New Braun
fels and spent the balance of the day at
the hotels until the trains were ready to
leave for their homes.
San Antonians leaving here for the
park yesterday afternoon over the Katy
ran into a heavy hail and rain storm
fifteen miles south of New Braunfels,
and from then until the train reached
the park it continued and the country
was flooded with water. The wind at
times reached a hurricane speed. For
a period of fifteen minutes the train
was running in darkness and passengers
in a coach could hardly distinguish each
other.
The excursion and picnic given yes
terday was the last of the summer sea
son and the rates which have prevailed
during the past several months on the
roads into New Braunfels have been
withdrawn.
Q C C HEALS
W. O. O. SORES AND ULCERS
• ,?’?’ S’ Sores and Ulcers in the very simplest wav. It lust com
b . lood * nd removes the cause, and the place Is bound j
b ? cauSo impurities and morbid matters which have been the
Frtwn 1 keeping the uk;er open are no longer absorbed from the blood. ;
mi™ applications of salves, lotions, plasters, etc., can never produce a
cat »iT d ° 1101 , reacb * he »ource of the trouble. At best they
paU l or r ? duce inflammation; such treatment is working on
a u d Ot r . eachln g the cause. Every nutritive corpuscle in the
thTnl^e W^k^°r^ ted ’ they nourish the fibrous tissue around
the place, but instead they constantly discharge into the flesh around the
quantity of impure, germ-laden matter which gradually eats into the
surrounding healthy tissue and causes the ulcer to enlarge. Since impure
b f ° r F° res and U 1 0” 3 ' a medicine that cak purUJtte
nf »n h a pe 8 ’ S ’ S ’ has loa « beea recognized as the
f l l b J°° d Pu rlfi ers, possessing the qualities necessary to remove
'^ PU ? ty fmni the blood. While curing the sore or iflcer S. S. 3
L? U L a h ® alth y condition of the flesh by supplying it with rich
Sores h and l TTi a ’ a ° d t J IUS tbe cure permanent and lasting. Book oa
Sores and Ulcers and any medical advice free to all who write.
THE SWIFT SPECIFIC CO., ATLANTA, GA.
MONDAY,
TOONERS HAPPY: CAN’T DELIVER MILK
NO ROCKPILE TODAY AND OBEY ORDINANCE
Jailor 111 So City's Guests Do If Milkman Tied Horse Every
Not Have to "Make Little ; Time He Stopped He Would
Ones Out of Big Ones." Never Finish His Route.
Notwithstanding many were sent to
jail in default of fines imposed by
Judge Buckley in the police court this
morning and many are in the lock up [
serving sentences, there is much jolli
fication among the prisoners despite
their predicament.
“There’s a reason.” No rock pile
j for the “weary” today. All city pris
! oners will be allowed to remain in the
cool and comfortable cells, sing and
| read and partake of “three squares,”
without having to work in the hot
broiling sun for the second meal. Un
less a prisoner is willing to work and
refuses to “make little rocks out of
the big ones,” at the rock pile, he gets
but two meals per day.
The rock pile feature was left out to
day because of the illness of City Jailer
Leon Valdez. Officer Henderson, who
has charge of the rock pile gang was
I detailed on duty to officiate as jailer [
• today, with the result that the prison-1
j ers were not taken to the quarry.
Naturally none of the prisoners like ,
■ the pile very much and when the an
nouncement was made that they would
be allowed to take an extra day of
rest, there was much fun-making. A few (
minutes later the strains of the song, '
entitled, “That’s Gratitude,” wafted
upon the ears of the headquarters men. j
' Bag time songs, in which all joined
| were heard in the jail today. This is
the first time that prisoners have not
j been forced to work on the pile since :
। it was inaugurated several months ago.
। “It is impossible for a driver of a
milk wagon to tie his horse every time
1 he delivers milk to a customer,” tes
, | titled Edward Dillard, a dairyman.
when he was arraigned before Judge
Buckley- in the police court this morn
ing to answer for a charge of having
failed to securely tie or fasten his
। horse, when left alone on the street.
“If I had to stop and tie my horse
every time I got out to deliver milk,
I would never finish my route,” con
tinued the defendant. Sometimes I
' have 10 or 12 customers in a block and
to tie the horse in front of every place
would take more time than delivering
the milk itself. My horse has been in
the service for eight years and is train
' cd. When I deliver milk at one place
। the horse will move up to the next cus
tomer’s home and stop and so on.”
The court was inclined to agree with
, the defendant and would have prob
ably disinisesd the case, but the arerst
, ing officer testified that he found the
, | horse coming down Presa street driver
! less and had covered over a block with
; out a guiding hand.
“We have to stand by the ordi-
I nance,” was all the solace that Prose
i cutor DeWitt could offer the defendant
and Judge Buckley accordingly im
। posed the usual fine of one dollar.
motormaTstruck
BY AUTOMOBILE
R. P. Tindel, 3319 West Commerce
i street, employed as a motorman by the
San Antonio Traction company, was
struck by an automobile driven by W.
, M. Merrett, 220 Madison street, at 12:15
o’clock Sunday morning at the corner
of Houston and Soledad streets and
painfully injured. He was knocked
I down, the machine passing over his left
| leg and bruising it considerably.
The injury, however, is not regarded '
[as serious. Because the injured man
| did not care to prosecute Mr. Merrett, !
Ino arrest was made by the police. Pa
j trolman Darrow made a report of the
| accident at police headquarters.
“We live in exacting times.” “As!
to how!” “One must deliver the goods, !
yet not be caught with them.”—Lou !
iaville Courier-Journal.
“Statistics show that Japan has two
earthquakes a day.” “Gee, a man
might as well be married as to live in
Japan!”—Houston Post.
In order to give the London police
men a day of rest each week it has
been necessary to add 1500 men to the ।
I
SAN ANTONIO LIGHT AND GAZETTE
[HINKS VICTIM
Jesus Fuenta Reads Account of
Fatal Accident In Light and
Gazette and Investigates.
MAY EXHUME THE BODY
His Mother Disappeared Sat
urday and Description Fits
Woman Who Was Killed.
Estefana Ulloa, in all probability, was
the name of the Mexican woman who
was crushed to death beneath the
wheels of train No. 12 in the yards of
the International & Great Northern
railroad yards early Saturday morning.
Jesus de la Fuenta, aged 17 years, re
siding in the rear of 724 Salado street,
declares the victim was his mother,
whom he says has been missing from
home since about 5 o’clock Saturday
morning.
While he has had no opportunity to
view the remains, the body having been
buried Saturday afternon, he is posi
tive the dead woman was his mother.
He says the clothing as described as
worn by the victim corresponded with
that worn by his mother when last
seen and that when she left home she
was harefooted. The victim at the In
ternational A- Great Northern depot was
found to have had no shoes when picked
up. It is probably the body will be
exhumed for the purpose of making
positive the identity.
Doubts Suicide Theory.
Jesus Fuenta, who is employed at the
‘ Duerler Manufacturing company, this
city, doubts the theory that his mother
I deliberately hurled herself in front of
the approaching engine. He can as
sign no reason for her desire at self
destruction and says that when his
mother left home that morning she an
nounced that she was going to visit a
neighbor on Monterey street. As far
as the son can ascertain no one wit
nessed the actual striking of the worn
an by the moving engine.
The story as published in the Light
and Garette Saturday afternoon led to
an investigation by Jesus Fuenta and
resulted in his learning, as he believes,
that the victim is none other than his
mother.
Read Story In Light.
F. M. Sanchez, who resides at 724
Salado street, read the account in the
Light and Gazette, and the description,
he says, fitted the mother of Fuenta.
The latter was away from home and
efforts to locate him were fruitless un
til about 7 o’clock Saturday night.
Both Sanchez and Fuenta hurried to
the Riebe understating establishment,
but the body had already been buried
an hour previous. The polio* were
communicated with yesterday.
Mrs. Ulloa, the dead woman, was 37
WAS HIS MOTHER
years old. according to her son and had
lived in the city about two years.
Missing Since Saturday.
‘* My mother arose shortly after 4
o’clock and prepared breakfast, after
which she announced that she was go
ing to visit a neighbor on Monterey
street,’’ said Jesus Fuenta todav
“She left and shortly afterwards I
got up nnd dressed myself and ate my
breakfast. I have never seen my moth
er since she left home Saturday morn
ing.
“I went to work afterwards and
heard nothing of the accident until
that evening when Sanchez called my
attention to the account in the Light
and Gazette. My mother weighed
about 180 pounds and wore a pink or
red skirt. She wore no shoes. I will
make efforts to try and have the body
exhumed for identification.”
When President Taft visits Chicago
September 16 he will be presented with
a petition signed by every player in
the American hVgue asking for a par- ,
don for Tom Taylor, the old Washing
ton player, now serving a term fot I
wife murder in the federal prison at |
Atlanta.
SICK REABACHE
_ _ ■ —l Positively cured by
rADTCDQ thcsc ]Liu,e PinB ’
v/A II I LIIO The y 8180 relieve DU
MHB ——■ tress from Dyspcpsto, Tn-
KITTLE digestion and Too Hearty
la 11/ F D EaUns. A perfect inn>
83 • ” edy tor Dlzzlr. ess. Nausea.
PILLS. Drowsiness, Bad Taste
XJ eq tn the Monti, Coated
Tongue, Pain tn the Etde.
—, I torpid LTVTIt. They
regulate the Bowels. Purely Vegetable.
SMALL PILL SMALL DOSE, SMALL ffilCL
CARTERS Genuine Must Bear
m |ttle rac-Simile Signature
I IVER
Spills,
lrefuse
Miss Scofield’s
HOME SCHOOL FOR GIRLS
Opens Oct. 6th.
Kerrville, Texas.
WANTED4S
MORE BANKERS in the 17 States in
which Jno. F. Draughon’s 31 Colleges
aro located, indorse these Business Col
leges than indorse ALL othera. If YOU
want EVIDENCE and want to RISE to the $lO-a-day
class, ask tur FREE catalogue. Lessons BY MAIL if
treferred. Draughon'. Practical Business Collega
EDUCATIONAL
1845 BAYLOR. COLLEGE FOR. YOVNG WOMEN, Ballon Tawa. 1909
OLDEST, LARGEST, BEST.
Chartered by the Republic of Texas. Stands for separate education of young
women. Course of study equal to that of best colleges for men. Superior advan
tages in music, art, elocution. Write for catalog.
W. A. WILSON. D. D.. Pre... Belton, Texas.
MJAUT Now open. Hours 7 to 9 o’clock. Four evenings each week
Hlluin i Individual attention by careful teachers. Backward student!
helped and encouraged. Low rates. Address SHAFER A
IT OGI DOWNEY, Proprietors, Houston and Soledad Streets, Sole-
UVIIUML dad BIock( San Antonio.
“THE BEST IS, AYE, THE CHEAPEST.’’
AVOID IMITATIONS OF AND SUBSTI
TUTES FOR
SAPOLIO
— - _ . .
j FOR SALE
a a
J 1386 acres located 7 miles southeast of Stockdale and surveyed Into !
. tracts of 166 to 350 acres each, some improved and others unimproved, e
• Soil, black sandy and shelly mesquite land, clay subsoil. Near church •
, and school. Reasonable prices and terms. Far full particulars writs J
i E. B. Chandler, i
• z
»••«**»*•••>••••••••••««•••••<••••••••••••••••••••••••
THE STATE BANK 6? TRUST CO.
321 E- Hourton Street San Antonio. T«a,
Will Handle All Your Business
Promptly and Cheerfully
W. T. McCampbelL Pres.
alamo National bank
SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS
CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $600,000.00
s»fe, Conservative. Accommodating
Both Burglar Proof Vault, in Fire Proof Building
SAN ANTONIO —
BE* " KER R V 1 LLB
SEPTEMBER 20, 1300.
J. H. Haile. Cashfer

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