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Atlanta semi-weekly journal. (Atlanta, Ga.) 1898-1920, February 09, 1909, Image 1

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THE JOURNAL
COKfRS DIXIE
UKE THE DEW
v OL. Tin.
FAST FLYER DASHES
INIOOPEN SWITCH,
I DEAD WE HURT
Illinois Central Train, Run
ning at High Speed, Wreck
ed in Front of Postoffice at
Coldwater. Miss.
ALL CARS OVERTURNED
EXCEPT LAST PULLMAN;
SWITCH TAMPERED WITH
Ob Relief Train from Memphis Went
Surgeons and Robert ML Beattie
Whose Wife Was on Wrecked
Train.
t»—■! «« i Fiau- >
MEMPHIS. Tenn.. Feb. B.—Running at
a high rate of speed, the Chicago Flyer
of the Illinois Central plunged Into an
open switch at Coldwater. Miss., early to
day. Two people were killed and a score
injured, eeveral of them probably fatally.
The Dead
MARTIN STANLEY. 10S3 Rayburn Bou
levard. Memphia
* UNKNOWN ITALIAN.
Others may bo dead m the wreck, but
their bodies bare not been found. At
the scene of the wreck It is reported that
there are three or four others still under
the debria
The Injured
George B. Matthews, expressman, legs
broken.
Musco Victoria, stealing a ride, badly
bruised and cut.
George Barnett. Memphis, engineer,
badly scalded, cut about the head.
L. F. Liebier, postal clerk, cut about
the head and shoulders.
Hugh Wick ley, 483 Johnson avenue
Memphia badly hurt.
J. F. Stevens, IM Union avenue, Mem
phis, bruised and Internally injured.
J. G. Neudorfer. superintendent of the
f Mississippi division of the Illinois Central,
knocked unconscious and badly cut about
ths face and head.
E. D. Cameron. baggageman. legs
broken.
Mrs. C. L. Harbert, Brownsville, Tenn.,
arm and face cut, and teeth knocked
• out
H. T. Euges, negro porter, slightly
* hurt
Frank Malone, negro, badly Jarred.
Relief train* were ruebed from Memphis
and Water Valley at first news of the
wreek.
P Details of the wreek are meagre. The
accident happened immediately in front of
the poetofflee at CalJwater, according Io
reports from there, the train hitting an
open switch and every car turning over
except the last Pullman.
One Woman Injured
All of the injured are men except one
' woman, from Brownsville. Tenn., whose
name has not been learned.
On the relief train from Memphis went
•urge- ns and Robert M Beattie, whose
wife was on the train. Mr. Beattie was at
the depot to meet his wife when he learn
ed of the accident.
SWITCH TAMPERED WITH .
ACCORDING TO REPORTS
Aaaor'ited Prs««.>
CHICAGO, Feb. B.—At the headquar
ters of the Illinois Central railroad In this
city, it was said there were 126 passen
gers on the train and some of them were
slightly injured Information was re
ceived, ft was said, that the switch had
been tampered with. Several cars were
overturned.
Others of the train crew who were hurt
in addition to Stanley, the fireman, were
G. L. Barnett, engineer, of Memphis; J.
G. Neudorf er. superintendent of the Illi
nois Central, who was on the train, and
George Matthews, express messenger.
Meudorfer was slightly hurt and Mat
thews' legs were broken.
Wrecking and relief trains were sent
from Memphis.
FIRST WRECK REPORTS
ARE GREATLY EXAGGEREATED
CBt Associated Press-I
MEMPHIS Tenn.. Feb 8.-News of the
wreck spread rapidly in Memphis. At
first ft was reported that as many as 45
wore killed and people with friends or
relatives likely to be on the train
thronged offices of the Illinois Central
and the depots trying, to get information.
The first word of the wreck came to
9 the Illinois Central office long before
daybreak The police station was noti
fied a# the round-up of officials and doc
tors was begun. Two coaches were hur
riedly made up at the Poplar street sta
tion and a switch engine came up from
the south yards. It was a few minutes
after daybreak when the special pulled
out and hurried south to the scene.
Two men on the special train who hur
ried to the scene with frantic interest,
werl the engineer and conductor. At the
throttle of the engine of the relief train
was. Dave Barnett, whose brother was
engineer of the wrecked train, while Con
ductor Jack Crider In charge, knew his
father-in-law. Captain BiUy Woods, was
tn charge of the wrecked train, and
feared his own wife and baby were on
. ft.
Barnett found his brother seriously
hurt. Crider learned his wife and baby
had not taken the train and that his fa
rther-tn-law escaped uninjured.
Mr. Woods, who is a well-known Mis
sisslppi politician and former member
of Governor Vardaman's staff, was in the
rear of the train, and escaped with noth
ing mor* than a shaking up.
WENDLING’S LECTURE
AT GRAND MADE A HIT
Delivered Under Auspices of Juvenile
Protective Association and Hand
some Collection Taken Up
The lecture of George R. Wendling, de
livered under the auspices of the Juvenile
Protective association. Sunday afternoon,
attracted a large audience to the Grand
Opera house About the subject. ' Unseen
Realities.” Mr. Wendling wove a most in
teresting and scientific address.
The lecture discussed and analysed both
science and Christianity, and was an ef
fective sermon on the unseen power that
controls the universe.
After closing his lecture Mr. Wendling
made an appeal in behalf of the Juvenile
Protective association. A substantial col
lection was lite result.
Mania Stmv>efeln Smmml
HONORARY ESCORT NAMED
AS BODYGUARD FOR TAFT
AT BIG INAUGURAL BALL
States and Territories Will Have Representatives On
Honor Roll—Georgia Will Be Represented On Escort
by Henry Hammond—List of Members.
(By Associated Preaa.)
WASHINGTON, Feb. «.-The personnel
of the escort of honor, which will con
duct President-elect William H. Taft to
the inaugural ball has almost been com
pleted.
The roll of honor displays 41 names. Os
these 38 will represent states, two Hawaii
and the Philippines and one the District
of Columbia. Georgia will be represented
by Henry Hammond.
The list Includes:
Louisiana, Walter T. Denegre. New Or
leans; Missouri, Charles Nagel, St. Louis;
Wyoming, C. A. Guernsey, Cheynne; Ohio,
Myron T. Herrick. Cleveland; California,
Percy T. Morgan, San Francisco; New
York, James W. Wadsworth, Geneseo;
Colorado, Chester A. Arthur, Colorado
Springs; Montana, Richard A. Harlow;
Utah. Hoyt Sherman; New Jersey, C. L.
Blair. Blairsville; Delaware. H. B
Thompson. Greenville; Maryland, General
Felix Angus, Baltimore; Vermont, Col-
:HOUSE INSURGENTS
ANXIOUS ID CURB
POWERSOFGANNON
Resolutions Will Be Introduced
in House Tuesday, Provid
ing For Radical Changes in
Powers of Speaker.
CANNON CAN’T SERVE
ON ANY COMMITTEES
IF RESOLUTIONS PASS
Presiding Officer Will Not Be Al
lowed To Have Place on Commit
tee on Rules, Nor Power To Ap
point Various Chairmen.
(By AasseUteg Fraas.)
WASHINGTON, Feb. B.—The - bouse
‘•lnsurgents” who are agitating a change
in the rules governing that body, will in
troduce a resolution tomorrow providing
for radical changes which are proposed
to limit the power of the speaker.
The conditions proposed would make it
impossible for the speaker to be a mem
ber of any standing or conference com
mittee. The speaker is now a member of
the commitee on rules, to which the res
olution will be referred.
It also takes from the speaker power
to appoint the standing committees, this
power being given to a committee on
rules and committees. The latter com
mittee is created to consist of fifteen
members, nine of whom shall belong to I
the party having a majority.
The members will be selected accord
ing to geographical groups of the states.
The members from each group shall se
lect their representation on the commit
tee on rules and committees.
SPECIAL PLEA MADE
FOR BAIL FOR MORSE
Application Will BeFiied With U. S.
Circuit Court for Release of For
mer Ice King
I
(By Associated Preaa.)
NEW YORK, Feb. B.—Application will
be made in the United States circuit court
of appeals this week to admit Charles W.
Morse, the former banker to bail pending
argument on his appeal from the fifteen
year sentence in the federal prison in
Atlanta for violating the national banking
laws. |
Morse is in the Tombs and application
for bail heretofore has been refused, but
permission has been given to his counsel
to make further application when ths ap
peal was filed. The convicted banker's
counsel are greatly encouraged at the |
number of prominent men who have sign
ed the petition asking that he be admit
ted to bail.
Among the signers are many well known
merchants, railroad men. bankers, brok
ers and prominent men of affairs. It is
said also that John W. McKinnon, liqui
dating agent of the National Bank of
North America, where Morse was vice
president during the panic, has signed the
petition and that stockholders of the bank
will make a special plea for Morse.
EIGHT-TEAR-OLD GIRL
SHOOTS SELF TO DEATH
Told Her Father That She Was Going
To Shoot and Sent Bullet Through
Her Brain
(By Associated Press.)
PITTSBURG. Feb. B.—Word was re
ceived here today from Bolivar, Pa., of
the suicide there last night of May Es
tella, eight years old. The child's mother
died some time ago and she has since
•been caring for two younger children.
Sunday night the child said to her father:
•'Papa, I am going to shoot.”
Before he nad time to realise the mean
ing of the words, the girl fired a bullet in
to her right temple.
ROOSEVELT CALLS
JAP CONFERENCE
Statement of Some Radical Action is
Expected from Whitehouse Some
Time on Tuesday
(Bv Associated Press.)
WASHINGTON. Feb. B.—President
Roosevelt summoned Senator Flint and
Representative Kahn to the white house
today, and with Secretary of State Bacon
and Assistant Secretary O’Laughlin, held
another conference on the Japanese situ
ation in California.
Another statement or some radical ac
tion is expected tomorrow.
ATLANTA. GEORGIA, ~ TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1909.
lins Graves, Bennington; Illinois, Colonel
Frederick H. Smith, Peoria; Kansas. J.
B. Case, Abilene; South Carolina, Hugh
S. Legare; Rhode Island, H. P.' Cross,
Providence; Connecticut, Louis B. Chen
ey, Hartford; Washington, John H. Mc-
Graw. Seattle; Wisconsin, Alfred T. Rog
ers. Madison; West Virginia, Captain
John A. Thayer, Charleston; Massachu
setts, Col. George H. Doty, Boston; Penn
sylvania, Col. J. H. Schoonmaker, Pitts
burg; South Dakota, C. B. Collins; Ne
vada, Oscar J. Smith. Reno; Michigan,
Albert Stickney, Grand Rapids; Ken
tucky, Morris B. Belknap, Louisville,
North Carolina, Ernest M. Green, Ral
eigh; Nebraska, Is ado r Zeigler, Omaha;
Tennessee. C. H. Ralne, Memphis; Ala
bama, Albert P. Bush, Mobile; Mississip
pi. Walter Weaver; Oregon, S. L. Kline,
Cornwallis; Georgia. Henry Hammond;
Arkansas, James W. Cochran; Virginia,
the mayor of Staanton; Maine, Chandler
Hale; District of Columbia, Larz Ander
son; the Philippines, Charles A. Otis.
SECOND PANEL USED,
NO JUROR SECURED
IN COOPER TRIAL
Most of the Men Drawn On
Fifth Venire Live In Remote
Parts of the County anc
Flock to Court. .
FEW NEWSPAPERS READ
IN THEIR REMOTE HOMES;
ILLITERACY PREVALEN T
Few from Nashville and Vicinity Can
not Qualify as Jurors Because of
Having Read Testimony in the
Trial for Bail.
(By Associated Fraas.)
NASHVILLE, Tenn., Feb. B.~*Over 400
of the fifth venire of 600 men have been
served and reported here today for the
trial of Col. Duncan B. Cooper, Robin
J. Cooper and John D. Sharp, charged
with the murder of former United States
Senator Edward W. Carmack. Most of
the men drawn on this venire live in re
mote parts of the county, where news
papers are seldom read because of illiter
acy.
The few from Nashville and vicinity,
it is conceded, cannot qualify as jurors
for having read the testimony at the
application for bail.
The court room was comfortably filled
when Judge Hart’s gavel fell at 9 a. m.
Most of those present were talesmen
with the usual sprinkling of loafers who
find the warm court room and comfort
able chairs a delightful resting place dur
ing the cold weather. These men and
boys come early and stay until put out
at night Some read papers nearly all
day. Others sleep peacefully at times,
but none pay a great deal of attention
to the court proceedings.
The first panel of the venire Included
48 names. As soon as they were pre
pared, the attorneys asked for and secur
ed time to scrutinize them.
A. L. Mims, one of the talesmen ex
cused because he had formed an opin
ion, was once a candidate for governor on
the Populist ticket.
First Panel Exhausted
The first panel of 48 men was exhausted
without securing a juror. The fourth man
in the second, D. M. Bannister, admitted
that his eyesight was failing, but proudly
added: “But I kin see to shoot a rifle jest ]
as good as I ever could.”
Asked how many children he had, he
replied: ”Es they be all livin’ now, and (
they was when last I heard from ’em, I’ve
got eight.” '
The state challenged Bannister.
The second panel was exhausted at 12:45
p. m., and the third called.
Court then adjourned until 2 p. m.
CORTELYOU HEADS
GONSOLIDATED GAS
SECRETARY OF TREASURY IS BE
LIEVED TO BE PRESIDENT OF
NEW YORK CONSOLIDATED
GAS COMPANY.
(Bj Associated Press.*
WASHINGTON, Feb. B.—lt is well un
derstood among prominent officials in
Washington that Secretary of the Treas
ury Cortelyou has accepted the presidency
of the Consoldated Gas Company of New
York. Mr. Cortelyou has declined to either
er affirm or deny the statement, but there
does not seem to be any doubt as to its
truth.
FARES IN SOUTH CAROLINA
ARE PLACED AT 2 1-2 CENTS
Lawmakers Fix Maximum Passenger
Rate by Passing Smith's Bill on
Mileage Regulations
(Special Dispatch to The Journal.)
COLUMBIA, S. C., Feb. B.—The house
has passed Smith’s bill knocking out the
present mileage regulations and reducing
the maximum passenger rate to two and
on-half cents.
■' frtkl I> - f<ESE NT
■ great e-st
—~-Cr-3trfl History. " *
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HAVE YOU GOT YOURS?
L 0 N. SEEKS TO
ENJOIN THE STATE
ASKS ORDER TO PREVENT COL
LECTION OF BACK TAXES ON
SBBB,OOO OF AlfclNTA & WEST
POINT DEBENTURES. '
The Louisville and Nashville road has
filed a bit in the United States court, in
which it petitions that William A.
Wright, comptroller general, be restrain
ed from levying back-taxes on $388,900
worth of debentures, or certificates of in
debtednes, of the Atlanta and West Point
road. The petition also asks that the
Georgia road be restrained from paying
such taxes.
Judge Newman set March 18th as date
for hearing the case, and issued such tem
porary restraining orders as were prayed
for.
The debentures on which the effort is
being made to collect back taxes were
tranferred to the Louisville and Nashville
road by the Georgiga road, together with
other property of the Atlatna and West
Point, but, according to the bill, the
taxes are to be levied under the conten-1
tion that the debentures are the property
of the Georgia road. It insists that the
Georgia road, if not restrained, will pay
the taxes and then call upon it for re
imbursement.
The taxes In question extended over the
period embraced between the years 1899
and 1908. Thy are school taxes for the
county of Richmond.
In denying the legality of the taxes, the
Louisville and Nashville road Insists that
their enforcement would be discrimina
tive.
In the bill It says:'
"Other property taxable In Augusta dur
ing said years (1899-1908) was knowingly,
purposely, and Intentionally omitted by
the taxing officers of said city from tax
books, and knowingly, purposely, and in
tentionally relieved of taxation.”
It says further that real estate In Au
gusta Is assessed at 70 per cent, while the
property of the reads Is assessed at full
par value.
WORLD TO DISCUSS
TEMPERANCE PLANS
Congressman Sheppard, of Texas In
troduces Bill Providing for Con
ference
(By Associated Press.)
'WASHINGTON, Feb. 8.-A world tem
perance conference, to be held within a
year, and possibly In Washington, is pro
vided for in a bill Introduced by Repre
sentative Sheppard, of Texas. The meas
ure directs the president to invite the
various nations now represented at The
Hague peace conference to send not few
er than twelve delegates to the proposed
conference, th purpose of which would
be to devise and recommend methods by
which these nations could co-operate with
a view to lessening of and regulating the
international traffic In intoxicating
liquors, narcotics and harmfbl drugs.
The president is empowered to name one
hundred delegates to represent the United
States.
DEATH CLAIMS TWO
IN MILLEDGEVILLE
Mrs. J. C. Whitaker and Captain Wil
liam Caraker Both Succumb
to Death
MILLEDGEVILLE, Ga„ Feb. 8
Death claimed heavy toll here Sunday
in the persons of two best known people
in this section of the state. Mrs. J. C.
Whitaker, wife of a leading business man
here, died as the result of a paralytic
stroke which occurred last Wednesday.
She was about sixly years of age and
prominent in local circles.
Captain William Caraker, age seventy
six years, who was an officer in the Con
federate army and for many years one of
the leading business men of this city,
died from a complication of trouble*.
LINCOLN’S LIFE ONCE SA VED BY
FRIEND W HEN HISSING BOMB
WAS FOUND ON SEAT IN TRAIN
Widow of Ohio Man, Who Saved President from Death,
Tells After Years of Silence Story Which the Pub
lic Has Never Heard Before.
(By Associated Press.)
SPRINGFIELD, 0., Feb. B.—That an at
tempt was made upon President Lincoln’s
life in Baltimore as he was on his way
to Washington to take office Is told by
Mrs. Coggeshall, widow of the Springfield
man who haved the president from death.
All these years the story has remained
a secret with Mrs. Coggeshall, to whom
it was told by her husband in secrecy.
Lincoln told no one of It, neither in his
family nor in his cabinet. It comes to
light now merely because Mrs. Coggeshall
believes its telling can do no harm and
that it may be an interesting addition to
the Lincoln literature of the month.
Her story is that a bomb was hurled
into the coach occupied by Lincoln as it
was standing in the station in Baltimore,
and that her husband first shoved Lin
coln through the door of the car and
then hurled the bomb through a window
of the coach away from the crowd.
Coggeshall, who was one of the war
president’s close friends, accompanied
him from Columbus, 0., to Washington.
He was later sent by Lincoln as minister
SLAYER’S DAUGHTER
ON WITNESS STAND
COUNSEL ENDEAVORS TO SHOW
THAT MISS ESTELLE SMITH
HAD NOTICED SIGNS OF INSAN
ITY’ IN FATHER.
(By Auociatsd ?r«ss.)
COLUMBUS, Miss., Feb. B.—Miss Es
telle Smith, who was on the witness stand
when the trial of C. R. Smith, for the
murder of E. A. Laurent, was adjourned
Saturday last, resumed the stand again
today. t
Witness was asked about the remark
attributed by the defendant to Miss Lellta
King, in which she said she had done all
the mischief she could here and never
intended to visit Mississippi again.
In reply witnes said the remark was
made In a light vein, and she never paid
any attention to It.
Counsel for the defense endeavored to
show that the witness had noticed signs
of insanity in her father long before the
killing of Laurent, and had told the
friends of the family of his condition. |
Several letters were read to the jury,
and they indicated that there dwelt In the
mind of Smith a constant fear that his
daughter would form undesirable ac
quaintances.
MILLIONAIRE STAR -
IN DIVORCE TRIAL
Lemps of St. Louis Suing for Divorce
and Big Legal Battle is on for
Custody of Only Son
(By Associated Press.)
ST. LOUIS, Feb. B.—The divorce suits
which Lillian Handlan Lemp and her
husband, William J. Lemp, Jr., filed
against each other came to trial in tho
St. Louis circuit court today before Judge
Hitchcock. Two hours before the pro
ceedings began an audience of fashiona
bly attired men and women had arrived.
The suit for divorce, for alimony and
for custody of William J. Lemp, 111.,
was filed by Mrs. Lemp, but immediate
ly thereafter Mr. Lemp filed a cross-bill,
also asking for divorce and the custody of
the child.
Mrs. Lemp asks no stipulated sum. She
says her husband is worth 11,500,000, and
has an Income of $50,000 a year.
to Ecuador, where he died of yellow
fevlr.
Mrs. Coggeshall says:
"A change of cars had to be made at
Baltimore. The special car dashed into
the depot and preparations for an immed
iate change for the Washington car were
made. Mr. Lincoln and my husband were
the last to leave the coach. Mr. Lincoln,
who was leading, turned just as they
reached the door and saw a hissing bomb
In the seat he was pasing. Mr. Coggeshall
turned and saw what menaced them.
“He gave Lincoln a shove that sent
him out onto the platform, grabbed the
bomb and hurled it out of the window
opposite to where the crowd was gather
ed and then hurried to the waiting train.
When they had become composed Lincoln
exclaimed: ’Coggeshall, did I not tell you
that if you came with me I should come
safely? God knows best.’
"For a moment my husband could not
talk. Then die said: ‘Mr. President, let
this pass no further. Let us not give it
to the world to be criticised.’
“Who put the bomb in the car was
never learned."
I FIG HI FOR CRUM
IS UP IN SENATE
REPUBLICANS /CREATE CONSTER
NATION IN RANKS OF DEMO
CRATS BY SUDDENLY REVERT
ING TO NOMINATION OF NEGRO
By Ralph Smith
WASHINGTON* Feb. B.—The Crum
case was unexpectedly taken up in the
senate this afternoon on motion of Sen
ator Frye, who has led the fight for the
confirmation of the negro, and the Dem
ocrats are considerably excited over the
sudden turn the affair has taken.
They believe that a fierce fight has been
precipitated and they are trying to lo
cate the motive that caused Senator
* Frye to throw down the gauge of bat
, tie. It is stated that perhaps President-
* elect TaTt has reiterated his desire to
have the Crum case disposed of before
he is inaugurated and that the Republi
cans are making a final rally to his
call.
This view, however, is not accepted as
generally correct and by some the new
move is attributed to unfortunate ut
terances on the floor of the senate by
I Democrats. By others it ,3 believed that
the announced purpose of the Republi
cans to abandon Crum was trick and
nothing more, it being tneir idea to
catcl! the Democrats napping.
SHOOTS BROTHER-IN-LAW;
CAUSED BY WHISKY
Trouble Arose Over Objections to Al
leged Intoxicated Man Going
After More
i
(Special Dispatch to The Journal.)
DOUGLASVILLE, Ga., Feb. S.-As the
result of a dispute, Oscar Miller shot and
dangerously wounded his brother-in-law,
Marvin Winn, Saturday night, two miles
from here.
Miller Is said to have been Intoxicated
and wanted to go after more whisky when
Winn objected.
Miller shot Winn twice, both bullets
taking effect.
Miller was placed in jail.
For Details of Qur
$300.00 Puzzle Contest
• See Page Eight.
ATLANTA TO SEND
BIG DELEGATION
TO WASHINGTON
At Enthusiastic Meeting Mon
' .dao $ 1,227.50 Was Sub
scribed By Citizens for This
Purpose.
ACTIVE CANVASS
BEGINS TUESDAY TO
SECURE $5,000
Central Subscription Committee is
Appointed and AU Citizens Will
Be Asked to Contribute to This
Fund.
Subscriptions amounting to $1,227.50
were offered, and active plans adopted
for receiving the remainder of pledges
necessary for sending a delegation to
represent the city of Atlanta at the in
auguration of President-elect Taft, at a
meeting held in the city council chamber
Monday at noon. Prominent citizens
who attended the meeting were confident
that the necessary $5,000 oould be secur
ed to meet the expense necessary for
sending a delegation of military cadets,
militia and the Atlanta Firemen’s Drum
corps to take part in the big pageant
planned in honor of President Roosevelt's
successor.
To Begin Canvass
A central subscription committee, com
posed of ten prominent citizens, will
meet Monday afternoon at four o’clock,
and arrange plans for a general can
vass of the business districts of At
lanta, which will begin promptly at 9
o’clock Tuesday morning. From tnat
time on until the subscriptions have
been pledged, the committee will not
leave one stone unturned to secure the
amount needed. The central commute
is composed of the following member;*:
Col. Robert Lowry, General Glifford L.
Anderson, F. J. Paxon. W. W. Orr, E.
E. Pomeroy, C. E. Caverly, Henry 8.
Jackson, Press Hudoleston, W. J. Till
son and Asa G. Candler.
The business sections of Atlanta will
be divided into districts and every store
and building will be visited.
Tne Isllowlng is a j.st of the subscrip
tions already pledged:
List of Subscribers
R. F. Maddox, $100; Henry Jackon, tloo‘
Robert Lowery. $100; Asa G. Candler,
$100; J. R. Smith, $10; C. L. Anderson,
SSO; W. J. Tilson, SSO; Mr. Martin, $25;
Judge George Hillyer, $25; C. L. B*an
nan, S 5; Chief Cumming, $25; J. A. Fisch
er, $5; J. C. Vaughn, $5; Company K,
$100; C. E. Caverly, $25; Cliff Analey. $10;
Mr. Watkins, $10; James T. Wright $5-
Mr. Carson, $5; Mr. Preston, $5; M-.’
Shearer, $10; Colonel Woodward, SSO; Mr.
Gardner, SSO; Mr. Pittman, SSO; Steve
Johnston. $5; J. Van Holt Nash, $25; Mr
Daley. $10; Mr. Cofield. $»; Eugene V,
Haynes, $5; Rev. Dr. W. W. French, $5.
William Tenell, $2; Rev. Dr. C. B. Wil
mer, $5; Troop L, $100; O. C. Fuller, $10;
W. W. Hullbut, $5; Joe Loewus, $25: a.
E. Wheeler. $5; M. O. Cochran, $6; W. h"
Higgans, $lO.
• • •
.flany Speeches Made
The remarks of the different speakers
brought out the fact that the sending of
a delegation to represent Atlanta in the
Inaugural exercises would result in the
following benefit:
The aid of the new federal administra
tion in securing appropriations for boule
vards connecting the battlefields of At
lanta.
A willingness of the government to eith
er donate or sei at a lower price the pre
ent site the Atlanta postoffice as a
home for a new city hall.
The securing of the ear of Mr. Taft's
administration for any favors that At
lanta and the s6uth may need in the
future. ,
The purpose of the meeting, the fact
that public subscriptions alone could se
cure the money for the delegation's ex
penses, and the advantages that would
result for Atlanta were outlined by May
or Robert F. Maddox, who presided;
Brigadier General Clifford L. Anderson,
of the Georgia state troops, and Colonel J.
C. Woodward, president of the Georgia
Military academy of College Park.
CROMWELL TESTIFIES
ABOUT CANAL SCANDAL
Counsel of Panama Canal Company
of France an Important Witness
Before New York Grand Jury
(By Associated Press.)
NEW YORK. Feb. 8.-Wllliam Nelson
Cromwell, who was counsel to the Pana
ma Canal company of France, the rights
of which were purchased by the United
States government, was a witness before
the federal grand jury today in the gov
ernment's proceedings agaiast the New
York World and others in connection with
alleged libelous publications regarding the
Panama Canal purchase. It was expected
that Mr. Cromwell's testimony would be
on the lines of a statement which he
made public on December 12. last, in
which he declared neither he nor a.nyone
connected with his law firm had any stock
in the Panama Canal company; that he
was positive no man in public in America
had any pecuniary interest in the canal
and that Douglas Robinson and Charles
H. Taft had no connection with Panama
canal matters. When District Attorney
Jerome was asked today If he had drop
ped the Panama investigation he said:
“The prosecution in the state courts
must take precedence over mat >n twe
federal courts to get results. A prosedfi
tlon of the same person in the federal
courts would be a bar to the prosecution
in the state courts.
“I am not going to enter In any speed
contest to get the indictment in this case
and until I hear from the attorney gen
eral, that I am to have the precedence
in this particular case, I shall take no
step.”
EDWARD AND QUEEN
START FOR BERLIN
Royal Couple Left London for Ger
man Capital Early Monday
Morning
(By Associated Press.)
LONDON, Feb. 8.-King Edward and
Queen Alexandra left London for Berlin
this morning.
NO. 42.

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