OCR Interpretation


Mountain Home Republican. [volume] (Mountain Home, Idaho) 1915-1946, April 08, 1922, Image 1

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091059/1922-04-08/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

MOUNTAIN HOI
(ill
T"
sr
VOLUME 32.
JUNIOR CLASS OF
HIGH SCHOOL WERE
SNAPPY ACTORS
Junior Play Was Attractive
Entertainment and
Showed to Large and Ap
preciative Audience.
The play "The Laughing Cure" was
Friday evening by the junior
■put on
high school students, under the able
of Mrs. Bertha Hayes,
supervision
commercial teacher. It was a simple
true story of an ailing young
attentive husband
unfailing in at
tempting to get relief for his. wife;
old family pill doctor and his
fashioned ideas; Auntie Doleful,
and how she came to cheer up the
patient by telling her how very thin
and weak she was, and that she knew
of somebody just like her who wasted
and died; the cheery brother
but very
wife, and -the
(whose efforts were
the
old
away
and sister, the funny Irish maid, who
thought the iwhole family was crazy,
the pretty stenographer and the
doctor with his phil
youthful new
osophy of life.
a
in
to
homelike and
natural. The fireplace with the blaz
ing logs, the rugs, piano, scattered
with popular songs the comfortable
chairs, the library table and reading
lamp, and the other little touches
that go to make a homelike room.
Laura Hanson, the ailing wife with
The etage was so
was taken by
no sense of humor,
Mary Chitwood; Clarke Hanson, a
of business and husband of the
man
ailing woman, Iwas played by Merlin
Hall; Dr. Whitcomb of the old school,
and family physician, by Arthur Tye;
Gay Haii30<n, sister of Clarke Han
son, Celeste Harley; Kitty Clyde, the
pretty stenographer to Mr. Hanson,
Marian Wetherell; Jimmy Mason,
Mrs. Haneon's brother and with a
great sense of humor, Byron Norell;
Mary Ellen Perry, the Auntie Dole
ful, Maude Beaman, and iNorah the
Irish maid Lucile Norell.
The students all had parts well
cuited bo them and handled them
surprisingly well. The young doct
or's theory of life and the prescrip
tion to unnecessarily ailing folk*
would not bring much business to
the drug stores, but his philosophy
would be more pleasant to' take. As
Auntie Doleful, in the characteristic
old maid costume and grandma bon
net rocked to and fro and told all
the cheerful things bo the ill wife,
the audience thought of how many
sob sisters they were acquainted
with, and hdw they resembled the
one sitting before them. The young
brother and sister with the sunshine
dispositions, and the quick* wittied
maid furnished a good many laughs.
The pretty stenographer was reason
enough that the business man was
tempted to 'neglect his home affairs.
The old doctor of the old school and
with bis quack idieae, but easily lead
by the younger mind, was also good.
Music for the entertainment was
furnished by Delma MacDonald, at
the piano, Ed Trathen, saxophone,
Lambert Cannon violin and Mr. Sim
on mandolin,^Harold Whitson sang
two selections "Dreaming", and "In
the Garden of My Heart, accompan
ied on the piano by Mrs. Hayes.
During intermission, two pretty
Juniors, Clara Swain and Zoe Bun
nell dressed in orange and green
crepe paper dresses carried baskets
made from the same colors and sold
candy among the crowd. Every
seat In the house was sold, and forty
chairs brought in for extras. The
money from this entertainment is t
go toward tine Junior-Senior ban
quet.
The other play, "MIsb Burnett
Put One Over," aleo by the Junior
students, was a ®tory of college life'
and how four girl* try to slip one
over on a rich friend of the collegi
faculty. Thie girls In the college
dormitory were Gladys Aldrich.
Gladys Flesher, Anna Miller, Mlnnii
Rohrer, Beryl Collins and Lilia
Young. Each part was well de
livered and everyone thoroughly en
joyed the entire entertainment. The
Senior class play is to be presented
In May.
The Misses LaNeva Wirt and Dor
othy Sims were week end visitors
from Goading college, visltjng with
Beryl Collins and Marian Green.
Spring Brings Jumping Horses.
The proof that spring has come
was seen in Mountain Home Sunday
when a crowd of young men put on
a bucking exhibition on the vacant
corner in front of the Helfrich ware
house.
Four horses were ridden, the first
by Grant Wilson, who coaxed a rea
sonably snappy exhibition out of his
mount.
his horse failed to buck but merely
Save an exhibition of rough running.
Lou Irie then rode the Field horse,
Paul Love rode next, but
who is a dependable circus perform
er and Iwill put up a clever but per
fectly safe performance as often as |
asked to. Wallace Frost then top
ped off a big rangy periforincr be
longing to Pete Zabrlskie, and
showed some real bucking for eight
or ten jumps when his mount broke
and run. This horse and rider were
the real class of the show and large
!y saved the performance from being
a flivver.
THINGS SHAPING UP
FI
fill
AT FEATHERVILLE
The 'big gold dredge at Feather
ville is getting ready for work the
early part of May if road conditions
permit, according to August C, Al
lan of Mountain Hours, who is reg
istered at the Idanha. More develop
ment and greater prosperity in min
ing lines are looked )for by Mr. Al
1 n. A great deal of development
work has been going on through the
winter around Franklin, Feather
ville and Pine, wherever possible,
said Mr. Allan. As soon as the con
ditions of the roads permit t ic
bringing in of machinery and sup
plies, more men will be employed.
The snow has been deeper iff these
districts this year than It has been
since 1917, according to Mr. Allan.
The stage has had considerable
trouble getting over the roads, and
t times it has been necessary to
tarry the mail and supplies on skiis.
The snow drifted in some places 5
o 10 feet deep; and if the horses
broke through, the men had to dig
them out, and then pull the sleigh
ut and recommence the journey.
At times, it was necessary to have :
horse on snowshoes to take the mail
and supplies throv\;h; a "horse on
snowshoes" explained Mr. Allan is
a horse whosq feet are wrapped in
gunny sacks and rags, until they re
semble an elephant's foot, and this
enables them to travel over the snow
without breaking through.
On a mining claim, which Mr
Allan and an associate worked
through part of the winter, the cab
in was completely covered with
snow, a tunnel being dug which al
lowed them to go into the cabin
and another tunnel made which led
to the cellar 1 in which they kept
their provisions.
Since the suolw has begun to melt,
the greatest danger is of snow slides.
At one time such a slide occurred,
making a mound of snow From 15 to
20 feet high over which the horses
had to pull the sleigh which
tained the mail. Statesman.
con
I
Spring Planting
. ^—
1
7i
\
•%:,
vml'SL
\
h(<s||
r
*•:
1
1
*3
> ^
f
\
> 92
» <2,
ar
CONGRtSStOSwd I'
1 HOT BED
\
■— Q j
r:
<?ipe^
r.
Ik
«ekt
I
• *
A '°v eA ,
■"
• -i
8LR
5 A
BV
o
■r
'
cUf
*
Mit '
If
Mi w-*
. c
iff.;
) :
iefff
l
5S5
■iftMY PY Pi)9 A
CAi Tg* C0
T"
MOUNTAIN HOME, IDAHO, APRILS, 11)22.
t
FIRST OF APRIL
iMr. and Mrs. George W. Hock gave
a party last Saturday evening at the
library club rooms in honor of their
daughter Meredith's eleventh birth
day.
| Tedder
All sorts of games iwere played
with the able assistance of the Missee
and Hauser, and Harold
Whitson and Volney Hickok. Miss
Tedder played the piano while the
young folks tried their .skill at swing
ing the light fantastic, and it c.vac
surprising how many of the young
sters could dance the new steps.
it being April Fool's day much fun
was enjoyed by the cake game. The
sixteen boys lined up on one side of
the rooms, the girls looking on, and
were told that a prize was offered
for the lad who
Miss Tedder asked each one to ex
tend his hand, and placed a cake on
it, and gave 'the word to go. The
cakes were on the chocolate cup
cake style, with the center of soft
white cotton, the outside fancied up
with colored candies. At the first
bite all discovered the cotton and
withdrew Ifrorn the contest with the
exception of Jack Bach ami Vero"
Davis, who swallowed the cakes, cot
ton and all. Jack won by a frac
tion of a minute.
The hostess with the assistance of
the chaperones served all of the ice
cream and cake that, the youngst-er
could eat, and all left at a late hour,
voting it the best and most enjoyable
party of the season.
atio his cake first
i
Celebrates Her Birthday.
Janet Pack celebrated her tenth
birthday Wednesday after school by
inviting in ten young lady Ifriends.
They played all sorts of interesting
games and were asked to close their
eyes and come to the dining table,
which was all decorated to commem
orate the occasion with a pink crepe
paper table cloth, with painted vi
olets and plates to match, in the cen
ter of which stood a large w' i;
birthday caketwith pink frosting with
ten pink candles in white holde..
as sentinels. The ladies present were
Ruth Osborn, Wilma Latimore, Hel n
Whitson, Nellie White, Dorothy Staf
ford Virginia Montgomery, Evelyn
Devlin, Evelyn House, Marjorie Van
degrift and Lorraine Stewart.
Spending Vacation at Home.
Irma Sboltz is home from Gooding
college, spending the spring vaca
tion. Last week the students of tin
college, including also the faculty
contributed the sum of $1,259 for
the new gymnasium that is to h
built.
This sum was solicited and
received in one day. The merchant:
about town have pledged to double
the amount given by the student
body and faculty. The students wore
given a half holiday as their re
ward for having such good success.
Irma states that the Idaho ath
.
letic track meet will be held at the
College track this spring. Athlete: ,
from all over the state will cam; to
for honors. Last year the meet
hold at Pocatello She returns to col
was j
lege next Monday.
IN Ml AlWilVE
SPRING SETTING!
company
waa attended by almost all of the wo-;
men in town, and the neighborhood
and
The hall
The
fashion
show Saturday
to noon in the Masonic hall put on
by the Montgomery Ulunk
towns. The room was packed,
all standing space taken,
was fittingly decorated to com-j
memorate the ISete of spring by an
•archway from the (ireiaaing doom,
and cages suspended at- each' end
containing little yellow
that chirped and sang and made
pleasing picture.
The program fwas opened with
selection by t he orchestra composed
of Mrs. Oitenhoimer at the piano, A.
A. Wood, saxophone and C. it.
W there!!, clarinet. Tha openiiy
temarks were made by Miss Emma
Ulunk, apollgizing for not having
enough room for all the uoats, and
"dating that at the next style revue,
It would be better to have more
mark's
chicken roosts along the side wall;..
She stated that she had tried t
croate a "something different" at
mosphere, from the full fashion
show, even to the men prevent.
However they were all on the
gram. The models were all differ
ent. She stated that the mo dais ,T
t full could not have been im
proved upon, hut that as there were
so many beautiful women in Moun
tain Home she decided to have every
thing defferent and give other wo
men a chance to display the beaut'
ful gowns. The showings were fr at
New York, Chicago, Toledo and San
style centers,
the models 'either wanted to look
beautiful or freakish, and Mi:
flunk stated that each lady guest
present had the same privilege.
Miss Coral Norton, a Boise singer,
pleased the guests with a selection
of Indian love songs, assisted at the
piano by Mrs. Hayes.
Little Dorothy Bennett was llie
drat model to trip through the arch
way to the platform. She modelled
the baby doll style coat. if. is
•hv.icucteristie of this day and age
iiat youth should lead. This belli,'
tier first public appearance, her
initial how was hesitant. The next
outli to model w.s Hulun Litimoru
wearing a eaptivalina wrap; Inez
turri, in a pretty spring coat:
Until Gaines in a youthful hiaui!
adored crepe knit frock; Marian
reen in blue geo >g<
arm that is so popular and with
he decorations of flowers and green
-'oliage, the truly wag the nymph of
firing; Mrs. Kllen Jones model!'d
i cornflower silk; Ml:
111 roe piece suit
to the thin figure; Eva Ake modelled
skirt with the ndw fringed
bottom and the new ehfe nlP
Mins. a. A. Stevens modelled an
tennoon gown
'riiiur...l in jade beads combined;
with black; Mrs. 0. W. Cannon mo-1
dolled a novelty sport
millinery wfurnished b,
Dorothy Leonard, and showed all
\
Most of
to, the miw
Sue Tedder a
adapted esp-cLll;
. sport
if black S':
>rge
The
Mrs.
the newest spring colors, which is
more Improve w t over the old T i
with a new name attached.
It was a pleasing scene
■'*om the top chicken
viewed
roost
r cl" the room to watch the mod-!
a a they passed til revue, piroiot
; through their limited space, un
til they made their pretty bow at
the bower of flowers, with the btrd.i|
trilling as their accompanist.
The next interesting f
the program
tiwo of our citizens, Sonora Louisa
I N
Oh
ute
a Spanish dance by
j Sau Cristobal and Jose Uriguen, her
I dancing partner. Senor Don Siieno
and guitar necom
I pm!, t, furnished the music. The
| ..p .jjjjjjj dances lire unique and fas
wo-; rmating to us. It is their tliema of
life, dancing, song and laughter.
This young couple aire two of the
I beat interpreter* of the Spanish
They are graceful, quick
look upon.;
af-i
tenor
on
6
an
| They were both d Pernod in Spanish
i altogether good t.
atumet, ,.f bright colors.
Viva la
|
a
A.
it.
| Kr.panola.
The models appeared again in an
entire change of costume, One of
m in-,.-! i IV...: ; ,v. : :m or hid
I
modelled by Marian
was.
tv
The
lit t II was Jus! an effective hiking
tilt, ns 1-t had the knickers and c
first
C
in.
mprorslon
with cape effect, hut t
'urbuttone.l (from the shoulders and
cape
was
•Hind the
fastened
waist, making
good locking street suit.
altogether a -pleasant af
speril in that spring sntur
ted atmijvpharo watching berirtl
'til women wearing exquisite gowns,
ind as the speaker said,
.11 go to New York It is gratifying
"•deed to have New York styles
brought to us.
It
IWilfl
,T
at
!
I
I,,
we cannot
m ADEN
til
JWI
a i
;
* PPf9If III IP
Aiikif
mi.
w
s i
rN jrfiir.'
'LLIiu
m
p
i
The opening of the First National |
bank Monday morning took on the
proportions of a reception within u!
few minutes after the doors had
owiing open lor business. Congeal- j
u 1 atory fellow townsmen and women
crowded in to congratulate the new
officers and directors on tIre success
i their work and incidentally to re
pen their deposit accounts. Nearly
all of tlie directors were members of
the reorganization commit! u, whose
. .truest work, in connection with J.
M. Lagan, examiner in charge
tralghtened oul the many perplex
tle a'
reopening pti
that
face a
problems
ing
and made the
sibie.
During the find two hours that the
o: e than 56 000
bank was Opel
and the men at th
■' deposi
keep up
with tiu' work that was piled lifirt
II. J. Dick one of the most
t
to It
we
pr
tho pub
lopular
over m
mon
Ilrurlfl h 'lik
a Mountain
was
i
,e window, and O.
E. Cannon
t
of the
reo:\';
hit r
E. K. I
at the other,
tin
with H''Voml' years
experience in the
existed them in get*
with their now du
I lie.
John
oside.nl Worth S. Lee
an
I rl; ,
nos
vice
ire day
during th
lobh;
reoeplcrits , of
coti
ssf u 1 out
iif the reorganization plans.
many
:U<
on
EnkrtPir. Illinois' Relatives.
f
and
|
Metb
Btewardson, III., surpri
al the
urday
ternoon by
Ti.mnounced
com 1
Hathaway la a sis
ter of Mrs. Tom Blodgett.
nd Mrs. Hathaway had mad"
Ilea of their trip in a Nash
Roadster' and put their car
n River, Wyoming
19. Me
Mr.
! a
e at Gr
slor
They math
on account of th
he trip to Wyoming In seven days
now.
their
make Id ah
TP
icy expect tr
- and twill either n-nt or buy a
nch.
of Former Resident.
Beat)
Clinton L. Barrett died 1' st. Fri
t a Pkjrtl'ind hospital, st the age o f
Death resulted from can
ear of the stomach, from which he
has been sufe lng for s> m 'line.
d la wn'l known her
| where he was in the harne:
or sever
The d<
.s buxine.
with his brother
1
hia
fn
, w ho w?i«
r ills death
he leaves an aged father, In Port
'land four brothers and three sisterr
him at tli
tlmip
sr
NUMBER 26.
|
ERA OF PROSPERITY
BUSINESS HOUSES
i
Since the leoponing of the bank
every business house in town
porta an Increase in business and
| especially an easing up taf collections.
With spring now opening, an extra
Opening of Spring Shows
More Signs of Local Good
Times Than for Past Two
Years.
re
j
j
hirge supply of irrigation water for
too farmer*, and all signs pointing
to a mining boom Of large propor
j tions,
with tills city as its head
tie people of Mountain
Dome are I titling more like prosper*
«> than they have in the past two
t|B,
i
years.
Annie iuffford Rowett,
Wife of .1. W. Rowett of Mountain
Home, Idaho, died suddenly from
hemorrage of the brain Saturday,
April 1, Iff22, at 7;00 In the even
ing, having returned homo in usual
he,.1th at 3 30, and prepared the
usual early supper.
Her span of life (was one day short
of fly yea;* and live months, being
born in England, November 2, 1862.
As Miss Annie Mugiford she was
mar.leu) to Mr. J. W, Kowett in St.
Austell, Cornwall,
1886,
England,
and together they came at
.that time to America,
made homes, in lliuky liar, 1887;
Del,:mar 1893; Silver City 1901;
in
They have
| Mountain Home 1 !) 10 ; her last earth
{ly home for th e
Three children have
them, Dora Amy, Grete,
j ceded her mot her, from
Home eleven years ago coming the
'9th of thin same month of April,
Th e are two ions, Ernest John
Rowett of Ogden, Utah, and Victor
Charles Kowett of Mountain Home,
Idaho, Her grand child, Dora Viola
Grete was left to her care at the
tender ago of one and a half years,
and has found hero her home life
up to the past year. Besides hus
hand and also Mrs, Kowett leaves
five grand children.
past twelve years.
been given
who pre
Mountain'
With brothers and elsteis she was
one of a l ire family of twelve, and
fight, a brother in
Chi" go, a brother and sister in
Canada, a brother and four sisters
In England.
r revived by
Mrr. Kowett heljii 'ed to the
ganizitUon of War Mothers, and is
or
he firm to break the ranks of the
'fountain Home chapter by death.
With
J her mothers in war time we
(•member her anxiety for Victor,
following him to Moscow to see him
off. and tlie longing to
when so sick wibh influenza
Meade In Maryland.
go to him
at Camp
Mrs. Ho we.fi! iwas a ni ,tuber of the
Wo.'l n Methodist chumch In Eng*
ml « ng in the choir.
She
nd
wae a companionable wife, a living
mother and
home.
niucli devoted to her
It was her common custom
to he at the store at the closing even
ing hour to accompany home Mr.
Kowett,
was always pleasant to meet her.
Cheerful and friendly it
Funeral services
from the residence, Monday afler
uoon by Rev. C. E. Mwon, assisted
were conductel
by the choir composed of Mrs. Bra
don, Mrs. Brlcgleb, Mr, Session^ nnd
with
Mr.
Norell,
Mrs.
Stewart
pianist,
ly liked by the departed iwere . ung.
"Abide With Me," "Beautiful Isle of
Somewhere," and "Asleep in Jeuis."
The War Mothers attended in
body, eighteen being pres; nt, with
neighbors and friends filling the
The out of town 'relatives
and friends were Mr. and Mrs. E. J.
Rowett of Ogden, Utah, Mr.;. E. Tre
coiling, a sister-in-law, also of Boise,
Mr. John Urea, a Cousin, and Mr.
James Harvey,
Silver City,
Grete, son-in-law and gratiddaught
By request hymns especial
a
house.
n friend, and from
John Crete and Dora
er.
Among the abundance of beauti
ful flowers was a plllctw lettered with
that endearing word Mother. A
brief reading service of committal
held at the grave, with Mr.
Zac her in charge. Sympathy goes
out to the bereaved In their great
loss.

xml | txt