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Elmore bulletin. [volume] (Rocky Bar, Idaho) 1889-1906, June 01, 1889, Image 1

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ELMORE BULLETIN.
ROCKY BAR, IDAHO. SATURDAY, JUNK 1, 1889.
VOL. II.
NO. 1.
FRONTIER ARMY LIFE.
■aw a Famous Io«lan Fight» W«c
Hot»bed of Mis Wife by Kcdskln..
The routine of army life and the
monotonou* march through the wil- deo
derness doc* not prevent a soldier >f
making an Interesting acquaintance
now and then with prominent charac
ters. Thu* the writer was so fortun
ate as to fall In with two well-known lutes
frontiersmen who happened to meet
at Maxwell's while we were* all enjoy- mors
ing that gentleman's hospitality. One
of them was the famous Indian tighter. ias
Kit Carson, who had come down from
bis mountain home on a flying visit, the
Hi* personal appearance differed very no
widely from the type usual among men tnd
of his kind and surroundings. Hi* tern
voice was quite mild, anil whoever
looked at his smooth-shaven face and
his hair combed down close to his
head, would hare taken him for a
minister of the gospel, rather than for t n .
a man who had many years been the
terror of the Indians alt over the West
cm country, and on whom they looked
flfren then—about two years before his two
*death—with fear and awe. The other Mld
raan was Lleutenant-C-olonel Pfeiffor.
who had served in the» regiment of i n
which Kit Carson was Colonel, and the !
two old soldier« hugely enjoyed meet- I
ing again on thut occasion.
Since the Indian* were constantly on
the warpath at that time, it was only
natural that our conversation should
torn on that topic. Colonel Pfeiffer
was persuaded to relate an adventure j
which he wan rather averse to talk
about. because it awakened the sad
wife's death. !
reminiscence of bis
There was a small military post by
the name of Fort Mcllae—now aban
donnd—on the banks of the Rio
Grande. It I* a wild-looking spot and
a very dangerous one. bemause tho In- j
dIan» use It a great decal for driving
tbeir stolen cattle across the river,
which is comparatively shallow and
free from quicksand just at thut point.
! The river describe-« a semicircle about
forty miles in diameter, and on ac
count of its banks being bordered by
recks, thick hushea, and ravines, the
u teams c-un not follow its course in that
ii neighborhood, but have to go across
! what is called the "Jornadodel Muerte"
m (Journey of Death). The roud takes
■ Its name because so many horses and
* stock, and even men, have perished
there from want of water. The mill
tary and their Iraihs used to take large,
transportable water tanks for tho men
along with them, and to travel at night,
so as not to be affected by tho heat,
The animals, however, had to bo un
bitched while the soldiers wore in
! camp, and driven fourteen miles to the
vlcinity of Fort McRae and back again,
merely In order to getn drink of water
a* the Rio Grande, and thus be saved,
if p* isibte, from a miserable death.
There are hot springs within nine
miles of Fort McRae, and thither
Colonel Pfeiffer went ono day with his
wife and an escort of about twelve sol
diers. While he was bathing, the men
were on the lookout for Indians at the
top of a rok about ten yards from the
springs. Hut the Indians outwitted
them, and captured the lady, while he
had just time to seize his rifle, and
wade across the river without a stitch
of clothing on. Knowing the Indian
character, he calculated that they
would not kill hi* wife immediately,
,. but take her to their hiding places,
' and make her do menial work. He
1
V
V
therefore made for the fort to give the
j^^iUar^anUsend reinforcements. Ho
Indians who sent
after him. ono of which
I
arrows
entered his back, with the end coming
out in front. In this condition and
with the arrow in his body, ho ran
until ho reached an inclosurc of rocks,
where he made a hait and defended
himself for several hours, while the .
l burning sun shone on his bare body,
causing intense pain, lie was known
\by the Indians as ap- excolunt mhrkw--,
Wmi. and when they found that thoy
I mit gel him out of his strong
^U V Mrbe^' u * losing several of their
,ey K * vo up the »tage. They
«ikt» ,no<,,u ' r *°ft than he ran for
^L JWife to tho post, nine miles
Bfay, and at last reached it more dead
Than alive. When the surgeon ex- !
* trioatod . the arrow the entire skin
peeled off from his body from the ef
fects of the scalding sun; and he was
at the point of death for almost two
months His escort, meanwhile, went
in pursuit of the Indians who had cap
turad his wife, and were almost within
reach of them when the savages, find
lug that the lady would be an incum
. brance to them in their flight, killed
Y r on the spot, and took Ui the bifkhes.
Whenever new troops arrive at the
froutier. the savage* make it a rule to
test. if |M>ssible. the enemy's fighting
qualities and efficiency in their own
•nliar warfare. Sinèe they have the
!
!'• '
advantage of thorough knowledge of
the country, they are apt to get the
better of the soldiers, unless they are
mandod by officers who have ex
in lighting the suvages. —
com
I peri
nee
Overland Monthly.
■ ■■* » » »
— A log. cut lately on the lino of the
» Northern Pacific railroad, in Wash
tnin.ui Territory, was nearly eight feet
. in diameter. It viu taken
they »-»ullage to escape the annoyance
ol f»dug called "too fresh. — Boston
Globe.
-!
fro.n a spruce tree. 196 feet Hgh.
P
discomforts, but
—Fish h» T< ' some
— It is wrong toxupposs that all the
ntiople m Kentucky are Colonels. Half
!)S them are. or want to bo. Colonels'
Somerville Journal.
I
,ve*
GROWING FODDER CROPS.
Mow
most
the
ing
fare
out.
Ooarsntrallon and <. onipr*„l*>n should Its
the llo'.e of Action.
a
crust
make
Unit
Its
on
by
«cil
day*
but
and
ling
the
Tor
two
and
ing
IL
In
I
as
is
The introduction and successful prso
deo of ensilage render the cultivation
>f the best fodder crops a subject of
mporluiice to farmer* and dairymen,
Without those it is Impossible to make
'arming profitable, for they are suhstl
lutes for the now Impossible practice of
tumnier pasturage. Our dry. hot turn*
mors are an obstacle to permanent
(maturing, which In spite of all efforts
ias been found impracticable, and as
forage crops can not be consumed on
the land without great waste, there la
no alternative but to grow tlieeu crop*
tnd cut them for feeding under a sys
tern of partial or complete soiling for
lummer use and for ensilage for winter
feeding.
-pwo considerations fhen present
themselves, first, the kind of crops to
t n . grown and the proper methods of
^Hure. There is a large variety of
these crop* suitable for cultivation in
t*,^, the» North and South, but really
two
Mld one of these fills the greater por
tion of the supply for the whole year,
i n gome eases, however, circumstanced
! make a place for some other crop as a
I ipeclai convenience, and it may be do
«irablc therefore to mention these as
luitable for filling vacancies which
may occur in practice. Having gone
through the whole routine for feeding
Iniry cows for many year*, we shall
j mention only those crop# which we have
used in our practice and have found con
veulent and useful. The list comprises
! winter rye sown early in the fall, for
»!
er
three crops only are required.
OI
use in April and May; clover to follow
the rye; early varieties of sweet
corn to follow clover, late varieties of
iweet corn or common field corn to
j come next; mixed oats and peas as u
change and variety with tbe corn, niil
with tbe dry fodder and the clover hay.
which is also needed to some extent
oven when ensilage is supplied. Ail
through the system a reasonable change
of fodder is required to keep up theap
petite of tho cattle and secure a full
consumption of the most nutritious
food, os well as to avoid any risk of in
sufficient supply by reason of failure of
crops through dry weather,
cases it is desirable to have a supply
on hand of dry fodder, as well as en
silage which may be available to carry
over the stock through any possible
emergency. I'nder the present condi
lions of all agricultural industry a higli
pressure system must be maintained,
and the resources of the farm must be
iet to come later, and then corn for the
rest of the season and for winter feed
ing a* ensilage, or as cured fodder; but
in the latter case a crop of sugar lient*
or mangels will be necessary to feed
In all
taxed to the extreme of possibility to
make the business as profitable as it
should be. Tbe aim of the dairyman
should a ways be to have one more
cow and to get a littte more feed than
will supply this addition, and so on. to
keep pressing on the spring« continu
ally. and the same principle should con
trol the farmer and stock feeder.
The same principle should l»o applied
to tbe cultivation of these crops. Nature
loves most the most ardent wooer. She
is most liberal to her much-exacting
master. "To him that hath shall be
given" in the principle upon which she
rewards the labors of the cultivator of
the soli. Large crops iead to still
larges ones, and so the soil should be
forced to the utmost on tho highpres
sure system referred ta No one yet
knows the full capacity of the soil, and
It is well that no ono who tills the soil
should ever think the largest recorded
crop can not be over-matched by suc
cessful efforts. We would advise then
. trating material and labor as long as he
can make the less area afford him a
larger yield. We have followed this
system for years with tho result of got
ting more fodder and grain from It
dues
for been procured before from 10.
every farmer to make a practice of cur
tailing his cultivated a-ea and concen
acres than had previously boon
grown on 20 and in getting more pro
square rod than had
This is
the central point of the system of prao
Mee around which every effort should
ex- ! circulate and gradually lessen the cir
cult Concentration and compression
ef
cultivates feeding crops and use«
the silo. And first, in regard to
the
age is to be considered. The soil
should he made like a garden. When
neighbors saw the writer covering
a field with manure aud torsing it
under, picking up the surface stones
and burying them or covering them in
the the furrows, harrowing re|H»atedly un
to .til the soil was imrfuctly line and null
low, they said. "That field was better
the
per
should be the rule of action when one
second consideration.
«411
worked than any garden."
the little four-acre Ueld turned off !25
Hut when
bushels of rye. nnd the next year more
than 13 full loads of timothy and clover
hay and full pasture for 12 yearling
heifers until late In the winter, the
profit of garden culture for field crofis
I sw at mi- evident, and this should be Die
Vay with si I fodder crops.
of
the
are
ex

W' ith regard to corn for this use. it
the U generally we think universally
conceded thBt a full crop of ears with
feet as thick planting as may Ic possible
for this rosiilt is the best This may
be procured by planting three or four
groins at eighteen inches apart in rows
thro*» feet apart and cultivating the
land frequently, bomo hints as to fei«
UU/i for tbill er0 p may be found in
but
another article on tills page, and by
; following this method on tho principle
above descrltxsd a very large quantity
the of the best feed can be procured on a
Half comparatively small area, and one cow
J to the acre should be the aim and motto
1 ot the breeder. - N. Y. Times.
V
OUR COW'S MILK.
Mow to Manas* It IToBtaW» to th, r*
*r'» A<l vantas*.
Tho woman who sell# the mint milk
butter U not always realizing the
most benefit from one cow. but rallier
the one who #«x-tiro# the most nourish
ing ami palatable addition* to the dally
fare additions which take the place of
desserts for which money must be paid
out.
Tbs
As
beetle
various
er!!
imal
A pint of milk, one egg. two table
spoon* of sugar, one of ooooamit, »'»a ' dead
a tablespoon of flour, baked in one , w<>rn
crust till It cream*, not curdles, wl Uu ,
make- a delicious pie; but If you «ell
Unit pint of milk for four cents, and in
Its place purchase berries or «onto otii- „ mH|
cxihmisI ve dessert the money will be
on the wrong side of the balance sheet
Nor is it policy to go to the other ex- , n|o
tremo and try to use all the milk fresh ,,
by placing It on the tuble, when tea 01 t .
coffee are |irepored. been
I will outline my plan, which works
«cil Ht our hoiwe. I he calf Rt three ^
day* old. might be sold for a dollar. ^
but «I four weeks, can be sold for eight u>
and jairlmp* ten. bat is got- ^ unj
ling a good price for a months
milk. I make butter through , w
the spring lour deep pails are enough H , lv
Tor the milk. 1 set them into a tank ^
through which the tubular well water
passes, or hang them in the well. Jhe , n((e<
two pails of the previous day s milk 1 u
have brought in each morning before '
breakfast, skim U.e oldest into the q(
cream jar and leave the milk for fowl,
and pigs, once a week or uftoner n.ak
ing "Jhitch cheese. From the other
pail I take a cup of cream for the
breakfast oatmeal mid coffee, adding
the rest U. the cream jar. and keep the
cool sweet milk for various custards. ^
pudding*. frittera cake, bread s,Hinge.
and baking powder biscuit, or to cs.li fa
rice in. and prepare numberless "tlx
ings; and as for Iced ml k for thr ln
table, it is rich enough. I churn every < .
other day. rinse the butler clear, sa I
IL and the next day work and pack i! , {
In a gallon jar. keepinf out a roll fo. ^
use \\ hen the jar lack* an inch oi w|)u
iHdng full, I put on brine and cover. 1 ,. |V(
make enough for use later; for In July, j
I scald up the churn in salt and »ater. ^
dry and put away. I hen begin, an
entire change of pvogrant „ of
I lie night s milk is bung in the well
as before, brought in In the morning
und the cream taken off. The days foi
string beans, peas, terries and pouch***
arc* thou come, and that quart of creiiu
will keep the dinner and tea table tip t*
the perfect mark.
wanned and added to. the now milk
(from which a largo basin full is saved
out for household use), and the whole
is curded for cheese. I curd three
days' milk before putting In the press.
Very llttie outlay is needed for cheese
making. A small tub. a large dishpai:
for a vat, strainers, pn hoop*, box and
lever. See a good cheese made, then
don't salt or scald too much, and rival
the factory foot-hall article. Chese
making is neat, light work, an hour ir
the morning and another at night be
ing sufficient for it.
With milk, cream, butter, cKe-sc.
vegetable* and fruit, one can set a
templing table with but little outlay at
money. — Cor. Minneapolis House
ko*5|K-r.
»!
er
The cold milk I»
lar
as
a
SILO AND ENSILAGE.
Information IIbmmI «»h th» VC>p»ri»nc» nl
Wall Known l>*irymrn.
Wo are having numerous Inquirie
about the silo and ensilago. and we will
answer them in the following, repeat
ing. perhaps, some things wc have re
cently said, that more recent inquirer*
may find their answer here. Wood 1»
better than masonry for the silo; at
least just a# good. We think the first
statement correct- Construct tt of any
dimensions desired, nnd as much ar
twenty-five feel deep, if you like. The
greater the depth, the more perfectly
the ensilage will settle of its own
weight. Be sure to build strong, re
meinber.ng that there is considerable
p-essure upon the walla We recently
gave directions for building air-tight
walla It is said that the reason thal
ensilage sometimes »polls at the cornel*
and on the sides is because it is trod
den so hard that it does not heat up ir
I hose locations as it does in the center.
Johu Gould says that the remedy
Is to trend it a little In the corners ami
leave it at night hc-a|»ed u|
right in the center. The third day
whon we get ready to fill again, thro*
tills corn from the middle into the cor
ners; that does away with the whul
ls it her. Have your carrier carry li
near the center of your pit a* you can.
ami distribute through the day, ami
then the last ll- roe or four loads t:ea|
In the center.
Do not tramp the corners ns much li
the conter. After the ensilage is pul
in, and left until it shows a tempera
ture of 125 degrees, throw on wilted
hay and place on it somit board*, or put
on tarns! paper. When you Is-gin t*
f ed it then- Is no dunger of it *|«»iling.
You take it from the top In regard tc
its effect u|Hm the quality of the
experience shows that it improves th*
quality. One man recently, in giving
his experience, said that before he fee
ensilage it took twenty |Hiunds of milk
to make a pound of butter in winter,
hut that with ensilage it tiMik but
eighteen pounds. —Western Rural.
It is generally known what a won
derfully soothing eîieet rubbing oi
stroking the sole of the foot has in that
terrible nervous uneasiness that many
invalids suffer from? It also will oft
entimes (wove of great relief in sever*
nervous headaches. Only try it ami
you will find the relief wonderful.''—
Ih'lrolt Tribune.
Too much help lias ruined men
meu than too lilU*
it
lilk.
it
in
by
a
I
SOME QUEER BUGS.
dress

cleaned
before

the
boot*
a

cently,
plaint
Ills
that
you
to."
Tbs t'.gjrptlsn Srsrabssus. Ilsslh W.lrhM
sad Kara law
As Is well-known, the »rar me us or
beetle was worshiped by the ancient
Kgypt'ans and was considered sacred to
various deities. It via represented on
monuments, in hieroglyphk- writing and
engraved on royal escutcheons Farth
er!! images of it as well a* of other an
imal forms, were entombed along with
munuuUM u, kaep *„11 spirit* from the
' dead ] U flg,,,* WR , Mt In gems and
, w<>rn („ jewelry as a talisman to keep
Uu , wearur from ^ The Insect
„,1 liai mod B f U »r death and given
ho|lorub ,„ buHtl |. Engraven on the I
„ mH| n , d the „.„ralneus was a remedy
wt i < . b ,. rm f t and ho id »che. and
)|e ukaSy k1(U u > bring it* jsissessor
, n|o fHV)|r wUI , , ho kin|r .
,, b mlt Mlr| ,rising to And that the
t . llri(Mlll taaBCt t, n „wn ns the firefly has
been regarded with so|MirstlÜous awe
varioUll tribes. The natives
^ India and other warm ootin
^ however, are said to put the Ilk**
u> H , lra .. v l*nl use*. They c ap
^ unj Ulcm i n Urge number*. and
them In egos of wire
, w or tblrty together, keep them
H , lv .. by filing then, and using them
^ ^ ^ ^ lbelj . houMn and w , ve
„ , h „ , k>bt „rows U i»> the
, n((e< . |(| ^ wel .„j tbplr ca|fc »hake«
u ^ «hem to shine brightly
' „ Tb0 U dics pin large numbers
q( lheae croaturee . n iivc. to ball-room
dre|W(J) , ^ w „ nr tbom a „ urnamanU .
Th# uuu ln so. t known as the "death
WRtch - a common |x»l of 11
and froquentty perforates large
Tu|umM wtth straight, tiny hob«. lU
|1W a b(nllMÎ j. 8U|( , KMM;d to por
^ >n ear lv death to «.me of the in
maW Watcher* by sick-bed* and auf
fa . tienU , iav „ u»„ so torrlfled
(b< , ufu . ann y ticking sound, beard
ln the allenoe of the nlghL that nothing
< . (mld oonvjlice them thal tbc jeotl.
I , w(|a not ullll(rat tbeir
i! , { U)on| ww> Hnytb ing in the supersti
^ thl>w3 who « dwellings are old
oi w|)u , d , ead briof and unoonl f ort »ble
1 ,. |V( ^ f(jr „ l# frwluently the case* dor
j lhe , ammer Unu . lbat lbe „ohm of
^ ^ ^ buard at anv
bour , bu d .iy and night in all parts
„ of the house.
t*
ir
be
a
at
and,
bill,
into
fied
fitted
ring
the
of
been
ly
soft
ed
the
he
a
of
The earwig, a small winged insect
commonly found In moist earth and
damp places in England, is anothur
harmless creature which has got a hard
name through no fault of its own.
though there is no authentic eases on j
record of this insect injuring sny hu- |
AI- !

man being, there Isa widespread |s»pu
lar belief that it on. y watchss for an J
opportunity to ersep into the ear of a
steeping |»er#on, destroy his hearing
and drive him to madness, if not to
death. In America the animal known
as the e rwig is a creeping, crawling,
many-legged worm, c-u' led by scientists
a "niyriadodous crustacean," a name
which is fully as long and as ugly ns
any s|>eeimoii of the earwig tribe
Thousand* of people believe that this ;
animal also has a habit of investigating ;
the anatomy of the human ear, tiiougl
those who profess to know say he I* |
perfectly innocent of any thing of tho
kind. Hoston Herald.
w
Notable Historical Events
First jury. 970.
Fins ninde, 14/HJ.
Needles used, 1S4S.
First east iron. 1.Ï4L
Matches made, 1M-J9.
Surnames used, l Hilf,
First new»pa|>er. 1494.
Coal used as fuel, la.14.
Ix-nd |H>ncils used. 1594.
Window glass used. 694.
First gold coin, B ('. ÏU6.
Tobacco introduced, lêX.'l,
First -team railroad. 1X30.
First postage »Uun|>s, 1X40.
Kerosene introduced, lxgfl.
First illuminating gas. 1792.
Electric light invent d. 1X74.
Iron found in America. lXl. r >.
First insurance, murine. .'».13.
First wheel carriage. 1559.
First American express, 1X21.
Musical notes introduced. 1XIX.
Ltd in ceased to be s|M»ken. />X0.
Hilde translated into Saxon, 637.
Gun|»owder used by Chinese. HO.
Hlhle translated Into Gothic, H72.
Old Testament finished. H. C. 430.
Photographs first introduced. 1X02.
Emane i|iation proclamation. 1X63.
Paper made by Chinese, B. C. 290.
Bible translated into English. 1ÄH
Boiler Explosions in 1888.
The Safety Valve give* thi* record
of boiler explosion* during
Total number of boiler exploded, 263
estimated loss to property, #1 lOO.OUO.
estimated loss by stoppage- of business.
$1.050,000; number of employes thrown
temporarily out of work, 10,000, num
ber of Uvea lost. 326, number o' person*
injured, 491. Of boilers in saw-mills
and other wood-work Ing establishment*,
there were 69 explosions: locomotives,
21; steamships, tugs and other steam
v»-ssels. 19; portable bollerw. holsters
and agricultural enginos, 27; mines,
oil wells, collier». IX; paper mills,
hloac'heries, digesters! etc-.. 13; rolling
mills and iron works, 25; distilleries,
breweries, dye works, sugar house* and
rendering works. 21; flour mills and
grain elevator*. 13; textile manufacto
ries, 16; miscellaneous. 21.
nl
will
re

at
first
any
ar
The
own
re
thal
trod
ir
ami
u|
day
cor
li
can.
ami
t:ea|
li
pul
put
t*
tc
th*
fee
milk
but
won
oi
that
many
oft
ami
men
1HKH
lilk.
— He proposi-d on the way home from
church with a Buffalo girl one Sundny
evening. Shu was too young to marry,
and did not want him anyway. But
she said "yes'' with the stipulation that
he should get her father's consent. Tho
young man wn# happy until he dis
covered the next day that the adored
one's father hod been dead soverul
He has removed to anothoi
y «»an»,
city. Buffalo Now».
I
CURRENT ITEMS.
—A New York grocer advertises his
business by stencilling his name and ad
dress in red ink on every egg he sells.
— Miss Carter, a California school
teacher, took half a day off recently ami
cleaned up $10.00(1 In a real estate deal
before the sun west down.
— Sharks have be-ome so plenty in
the harbor of Havana that a sailor's
boot* thrown overboard will bring hall
a dozen of the hungry monsters to the
surface to inquire what time the sa ior
himself expects to tumble in.
— A Scotch preacher in London re
cently, speaking of the frequent com
plaint of preachers for being dull, gave
Ills hearer* this shot: "The fault Is not
that we are poor proneher*. but because
you are mighty poor stuff to preach
to."
ll nw
minds
curred
with
Ilryau
son
will
Ids
gaged
long
tire
telling
end
so
"
foot
face
loon
.helf
fare
n!
in
the
I
.
of
while
—A Hrewer. Me., woman,
hanging out her wash, discovered what
appeared to be a patch In a hem of a sk IrL
and, investigating, found It to lx* « $.'>
bill, which she had long Indore sewed
into the hum for safe k**eptug ami for
gotten.
— Scent pencils, cnmpo*<*d of solidi
fied |K»rfume, are a novelty. They are
fitted in silver ludUem. have a tiny
ring attached to them for fast»*iiing to
the wa ch chain or chatelaine, and
when rubbed on the bund* or any pari
of the dress emit a delicate edur.
—A mineral that resemble# coal has
been found on a farm at Southwest
Harbor. Ms. It burns briskly till near
ly half reduced, and when burning is a*
soft and ductile as putty. When burn
ed out the sotwtam-o is blue'« jet ami as
hard as tlinL Rubbed with a woolen
cloth It will give a 1».», liant polish.
— The millionaire railroad man.
Colonel I'eter*. who recently Ui»*d at
Atlanta, was the first (Hirson to b.-tng
the Angora goat from the I'ral moun
tains to this country He w as a great
scholar, and said to be one of the besi
rend men in the South. In his youth
he wa an engineer on a Georgia rail
road.
—^Then* was a revival of religion nt
Mobcrly. Ma. und aiming the conver
sions was that of a man who had been
a very liant case- When lie went for
ward in the church tnmn'ie apnifesshm
of his faith he surprised the parson and
people by handing to the former a
bottle half full of whisky and a slung
shot He said that he promised to re
nounce all Ins evils.
feet
ly
ng
«low
■rn
:
non
piy
the
of
on j lors bull in Heard County. Ga, went
hu- | home lute the othe ■ night As they
were aliout to enter the house they
AI- ! —T wo young men who keep l»ache
of
of
an J heard a low. gurgling sound, which
a frightened th'-m that thoy ran half a
mile to a neighlior * house. A party
to from there armed themselves with
axe*, scythes, pitchforks and other
deadly weapons nnd returned to find
thal the noise had boon made by a dog
that was choking to death on a bone.
ns
this ; by brick from the top downward. A
; Ion : chute, one-half an inch longer and
I* | !uneiislon*. was first erected within
tho tho llue. It w » air-tight and rase from
an uir-tight »x>x placed nt tli bottom
of the chimney. The bricks were
drop|ied one by one through this chute,
and were cushioned by the air so thut
none were broken or injured. From
time to time the box was o|ieued and
the lirleks that hud accumulated were
—A chimney in Middlesborougli,
England, was lately taken down brick
w ider than a brick in its cncss-seetlonnl
record
263
num
steam
mines,
mills,
rolling
and
and
«•moved.
— A# a (Hisaihlo theory of the origin
of the Mississippi, it is suggested thut
its erosion was accomplished by means
of a mighty cataract which Isigan fur
down the river near it# original mouth,
and by gradual reirocossion dug out the
valley-like gorge which is so marked n
feature in the upper part of it# course,
and left the high bluff walls on either
hand. This view makes St. Anthony's
Fulls tho ever-decreusing and receding
remnants of tho once most stupendous
cataract the world ever saw, having ii
per|H-ndiculnr descent of l>orlmp# 60"
The time required to cut the en
feet
tire channel is plue*»d at 4**M» » > years
CATCH NQ A BOA.
Mow On«- *»l «He Hu*» K»t»lll»» Was lt*u»
ril In by Malay Huiliers.
After alsiut an hour of crawling and
positing through, our men suddenly
stopped ntul began to (xiint ahead, chat
tering anil gesticulating,
way they |x<iut«>d, wo saw in a tree an
Immense lx»a constrictor waving hi»
hi-od U» and fro. with his *»-ales glitter
ing in the «tin. My friend said "Get
back, quick, hi- is preparing to jump!
and we did *<»a* fust as po«»ihio After
consulting a few moments the Malay*
cautiously advanced with a las**»,
w hich by a dexterous throw caught tin
snake around the neck, and jumping
behind n tr*-c they tighi*-n.-«l It on him
Hu trashed an»! pu led. and it was all
lliu four Malays could do to kuup from
being drawn near enough for him b
crush them, and once or t ' Ice it
ed ns though he would get I hem.
We could have shot him at first, but
they wanted to capture him alive.
1er a while by pulling and choking him.
they made him give up nnd pulled him
down from tbe tree. He wits a big fellow,
twenty feet long and very large around.
They have great slrengh. and this one
I was assured ronhl swn.low u gont or
sealf. He wit# looking for probably
plenty there, living
:
king th*
1HKH
cm
Af
leopards that uru
principally on monkeys, nnd the snake*
also catch them when they can; hut
from
marry,
But
that
Tho
dis
adored
soverul
sally the monkey is cleverer timt» the
They sometime# gather iu big
soak
bands und club the bon* to death.
The Malay* made a eng*» very quick
ly. cutting lengths of bamboo and
noteliing thorn together, into wliiel
they put liie snake, and swinging it oi
two pole* inarched off with it on tbeii
should*»» s.—Forest and blruuu.
A THRILLING STORY.
A
aw
ll nw Mr. MrSwyny's Wirsd I'n n-ladad a
SI rasg*. It.cmi.altr Tals.
"S|H-aking of flash literature*
minds me of an incident which oc
curred some time since in connection
with a deceased friend of mine." said
Ilryau Mc'Swyny yeatentay. "The per*
son alltid-d to was a man of geiiiow I
will not nicention his nam**. tx«-aii*e of
Ids faniilv connections He was en
gaged in writing a serial story for a
well-known weekly paper of the
Snake-Eyed Boh. the Holly of the
Wixxl#' order. The story hail run so
long that the publishers were getting
tire of it. and they wrote to my friend
telling him to bring the story to an
end in the next installment. He did
so in the following unique manner:
" 'The liai bam rose slowly from the
foot of the cliff, bumping along the
face of the roek as it did so Angelina,
frightened at the prosp *ct of the
perilous journey ahead when the bal
loon was oue thousand foot from the
ground. juin|icd recklessly out u|Mtn a
.helf of rook wtiteh projected from the
fare of the cliff. Frenzied with fear
Algernon followed his love at the risk
n! breaking his neck, and the
balloon -ailed away and left them
in their precarious situation,
the
A
great
s
less
womb
iop**d
loader
blood.
water
upon
vml
want.
food,
the
with
-harp
■»tend
As
mind,
and
abused
It
jawed,
lhe
only
of
Iwith.
ful.
but
is
doe#
the
:i
"letter« an
■Uld
lhe
no
fat
1
V
There
were one thousand
feet from the top of the cliff and an
espial distance from the bottom. Al
gernon sealed himself beside the love
ly muideii and clasped her to hi* heav
ng hOMim in a passionate embrace
«low ly the sun sank behind the wc*st
■rn hills. It# aspiring ray* lit up the
forms of the lovers, oblivious of their
lovers
:
awful |Ri*ition. The shadows deep
ened and night fell like a black pall
ti|M»ii the scene.
" • "Will you always In.-a me, Alger
said Angelina.
" • "Till death, darling." wa* the re
non
piy
•• -Tiir. test».'
••Well," continued Bryan,
began to arrive at tho office of publica
tion asking such fateful questions as
these: -What lieoHme of the lovers?
Did
Did they dry up and blow away?
the liuz/ards feed upon the- form of the
lovely Angelina? Did they fall off the
cliff and smash into piece* at the foot 1 '
Did a bowlder roll over the edge of the
cliff and crush them? Did the birds of
the* air bring food to the lovers? Did
some one let a rope down from the to|
of the cliff and pull 'em up? For
H-uven's sake, what became if them?'
"These letter* accumulated so fast In
the office that the publishers became
alarmed and wrote to my friend, ask
ing him to write another installment
of the story, which he gladly did. the
concluding sentence» of the last chapter
wing as follows:
•• -The long night pass»«! slowly
away with leaden tread. The eastern
*ky began to flush with the first beam*
of morning light.
'"Ar*- you uwako. d-arest?" whis
»c-rc-d Algernon in Angelina's shell-like
a
A
rar.
•• -The white furtuin* over the benii
tiful eyes slowly lifted, and the musical
vole«- replied ilia fuilit whisper:
•••••Yes, darling, but I'm very hun
•• • "By the guds," replied Algernon,
-pringing excitedly to hi# feet, "you
■hall have food' For see, dearesL the
lalluon approaches."
"'it was indeed as Algernon had
-aid. Outlined against the fleecy
-louda. by straining tVuwie eye# of
leavenly blue, Angelina could see a
'iiint speck about as big a# a door
knob. The #p--*'k gradually grew
larger as the two lovers gazed hungri
ly upon it. now taking upon it the di
mensions of an orange, then swelling
mt as large as aooconnut, until It drew ]
within their sight and assured thorn :
lliât they **<>tiId not be mistaken; I j
indeed their long-lost balloon
fur
the
n
ii
60"
en
was
Then their fears wer - excited anew by
teeing the balloon sway as it was struck
by a eurt-eiil of air. t'lusping her
bands around Algernon's neck, Ange
lina exclaim*«! in agony:
j
"•"Oh, darling, th*- balloon is going
away!''
"•"Wait, love." said Algernon,
•oothingly ; "another blast may strike
it"
and
an
hi»
tin
all
from
b
but
him.
him
one
or
•• -it was indeed so. »* Algernon had
*uid. A favoring gale from Heaven, It
seemed, din-eted the balloon towurd
the el iff again, and in a miraculous j
manner it wa* waft-d against tho fac*
and '
th*
of the cliff A* it came nearer
nearer to their resting place Algernon
*iti*l, in a husky whisper:
.Now, la-iia. my heart's love,
jump when I jump."
•• I'h.-v jumped and clung like spt
d.-rs to the netting until Algernon had
descended to the cur. Then, like the
». Algernon rescued hl* dnr
ling one from her jx-riious |x>sitioii and j
laid her u|xm the fiixir of the ear. Ml»
.vas resuscitated by a drink of life-gtv |
inf brandy, which Algernon found in
;
which the
hero hc w
cm
a h!HU|K»r, und un hour later was
pleasantly engaged in viewing the j
diversified landscape, o.t.r 1
hulhxin sailed like a swallow In its |
Af
flight.
" Higher and higher the balloon
1
pot«» until u bund of Indian» who wprt* |
watching it saw it gradually fad. away j
against the empyrean blue of the sky
until it dwindled down to the size of an
apple, then fudi-d away until only a
like the head of a. pin re
m lined, and then w as lost In the
hut
the
big
shadowy realms of space.
•• -rm'. ttxu.'
and
oi
tbeii
"Well, whnt did the publishers sny
this tint»*?"
"Oh." replied Bryan with a smile,
"they simply discharged my friend,
hat's all "—Chicago Mull.
A SERMON TO PARENTS.
aw < 1,11 «Iren Arm Macs* latparfert Pt* y si
c-sllr aad Moatallv.
A child comes Into the world as the
great preparatory field from which It
s very soon to emerge Into the bound
less beyond. It I* taken from the
womb and thrown into a crSdle, It is
iop**d and dosed with something to
loader it to sleep and stagnate its
blood. It is denied fresh air, pure
water that goes to help make a pure
physical system. It is left unfed hours
upon hour« when it* stomach is empty
vml it# physical system I# worried by
want. It is neglected when it wants
food, water or care. It is helpless in
the luiniis of those who torment it
with pins, bandages, yanks, jerks,
-harp words ami fault-finding, till the
growing mind finds itself in hell in
■»tend of Heaven.
As the ehild* grow* on in years, its
mind, ever on the alert, as it seeks for
information of some kind, it dc loots its
|«ir»-nts in hundreds of petty falsehood*
and learns to lie. It ex|ieriem*e*
cruelty and ticeoine* cruel. It is
abused and learns to abuse In rein™.
It is cuffed, slapped, kicked, yanked,
jawed, scolded, worried and hung upon
lhe outer walls as trash, when it t* the
only thing on the place that Is to so
i-ompany its parents into the beautiful
iH-yond. it listens to profanity and
vulgarity, and beeome# vulgar and
profane. It is lied to in all manners
of direct and indirect ways by its
pan-nts, and thus learns to considor
falseliood as n pleasure or uooesslty. or
Iwith. It is not turned to the beauti
ful. as is the work of the glassmakers,
but is left to get up and out of darkness
is best it eon. It is fed with food that
doe# not nourish, and ila body becomes
the home of ntlmenL malady and dis
I hen. when it has a headache,
:i stomsch-aclie, a blind eye, a de
formed foot, a blemish, or weak,
deformtbl spot, it is taught that (iod
made it so, when (iod never yet made
an iinperfect human ta-mg. Every
physical imp»*rfection U the protest of
nature against ignorance, carelessness
■Uld indifference to results.
Every mentally-imperfect child is
lhe «esult of the carelessnc .s and neg
lect of its parents and the public
impure fiHMl. deleterious fluids, im
proper care, lack of paternal love,
»ernielou* reading mutter that distils
dirt into the young mind, all injure
tnd unfit it for the future. Men have
no business to have laud, horses, rat
io. wives or children until they can
properly care for wbat thry have, and
the most valuable of all tin* y have is
their children. Why is it that we do
tot all try to treat them and their
nentaliti»*# in a proper manner? Good
fat lier ami good mother, in not a child
1 Hitter than a horse, a cow, a hog or a
farm? —"Brick" 1'oroeroy. in Advance
V bought.
•use.
as
1 '
of
I
In
the
THE MOON'S REVOLUTION.
Whr Wr Ma» Weed Ic. Ha Urtoallr Orato
fui far Owe *•»« III».
If we could take a bird's-eye view of
the iHirtion of the solar system con
taining only the sun, the earth and
the moon, we should see the sun mov
ing with rapid pace through the vast
regions of space, taking with him tho
earth and the moon. We should see
the earth revolving round the sun.
taking with her the moon. We should
ilso see the moon revolving round tho
■nrth. her motion round lioth sun and
■nrth causing her to move in an Ir
regular curve, always concave to tho
*un.
hun
"you
the
had
of
a
can
di
drew ] vails even ir. this small portion of the
thorn : material universe. For it must be ra
I j membered thal our majestic sun Is but
» shining point, seen from the nearest
fixed star, and our earth and nimm are
We could then realize as no words
describe how exceedingly com
plicated is the motion of the moon in
her orbit, and admire with reverent
awe the heavenly harmony that pre
by
her
invisible to the sun# of spa*
'The iiiixin revolves around the earth
from any fixed star to the same star
igaln. in twenty-seven and three-tenths
lay*, completing a perimlic or sidéral
j revolution.
The earth meantime has advanced in
going
her orbit, and the moon requires more
time to complete a revolution in regard
to the suit, bringing sun. moon and
north into line, and making the time
from new moon to now moon again
had
It
j twenty-nine and a half day*. This is
fac* called a lunar month, lunation or
and ' synodic period.
The moon is often considered as of
little consequence in the economy of
love, creation. But what would the earth
do without her? She is our minister
spt- and companion. If she wen- blotted
had from th.- skies there would be no tides
the of "»>' amount, no silver crescents
dnr- hanging in the golden West, no glorl
and j °i*a foR moons fiixiding the sleeping
Ml» earth with soft lights nnd shadows,
| and no total eclifise* of the sun. the
in ino»t sublime phenomena on which
; mortal eye* r»**l
W* have need then to be devoutly
the grateful for our satellite, for her post
was
the j
its | lion in the heavens, for tho short period
of her revolution, and for all the blees
.'»S that follow in her ti-aiu. Her move
1 mem round the earth Is but one short
wprt* |
away j chapter in the complex history of uur
•arcsl and most intimate celestial
sky
an
a
re
the
Youth's Companion.
neighbor.
In conversation, the medium is
••'itliei- to affect silence or eloquence;
not to value our
Sbation; and to
endeavo" to excel u# who are of your
company, are equal injuries. Th#
great enemies therefore to good com
pany, and those who transgress most
against the laws of equality, which is
the Ufa of it, are the clown, tbs wit
abd the pedant. —Kir K_ Stools.
wr
sny
smile,
friend,

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