OCR Interpretation


The Ketchum keystone. [volume] (Ketchum, Idaho) 1885-1899, January 14, 1893, Image 1

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091095/1893-01-14/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

Kcrsio** t» the legal ne ws p a per of
Creek, Wood -River-and
The
WarmSprtnZ*
Sawtooth ifmikg Districts.
rmBiuor guBBemPnùs.
- *4 .00
One yeaf-l Postage Prepaid)
Six months
Three months ...
One month -
Single copy *
2.00
1.00
.50
.15
PAYABLE tS ADVANCE.
Advertising rates tarnished on application.
PROFESSIONAL.
WM. nf.VDJTAlf,
A TTORNEY-AT-LAW, Ketchum. Idaho.
Practices in ail the Court« and Land
Offices in the State.
MISCELLANEOUS.
^W! UBLM îdÉ
LU
3*
40 fi
fr
z
UJ
s w.
M *
Ask Tour Retailor tom the
JAMES MEANS
JAMES MEANS
S3 SHOE
iMtfUag to Tsar Issli*
rtm
Md
SO " BREAKING JN,"«*
*o* BWÄcÖy *a»y the fett dm »
U warn. It will latisdytfee rant
AstfcUoax. Jamkb mtAW
V S3 SHOE to AlMotatety ibe
V only shoe of it« price which
J»«»erer been placed «*
v^teoslvelr cm the market
i. yX Ab wMA durability
U eonakiered befbre
aot
waid
*<• vfi
Art formte ,T«oe* "
Bu«« SI SUm (hr Bey«
J. MEANS At CO„ Beaten,
fell Um« mi ike akeve (AeM ter «ol« Mi
Alturas Saddlery Co.
HAILEY, IDAHO.
Patrick McMahon
DEALER IN
liEMIL MERCMMISE
GROCERIES,
Gent's Furnishing Goods
Boot» and Shoe«,
LADIES'and CHILDREN'S SHOES
of the latest styles aud patterns,
MINERS 1 SUPPLIES, Etc. Etc.
foreign and Domestic fruits
Kept constantly on band.
tobacco a.\d; cigars
And Smokc-rs' Articles.
Give me a trial and I will guarantee entire
satisfaction.
.Votice of Forfeiture.
A
To M. R. Evans, his heirs or legal repre
sentatives :
You arc hereby notified that we hare ex
pended two hundred (200) dollars in labor
and improvements upon the Stiutty
4 'up East and SMutty Cup Went
lodes, situated on Trail creek, m Warm
Springs Creek mining district. Alturas
county. Idaho, in order to hold said prem
ises under the provisions of Section 2324,
Revised Statutes of the United States, be
ing the amount required to hold the same
for tbe year ending December 31,1891; that
the proportion of said expenditure due
from you. M. K. Evans, is 433 33 'A. lawful
money of the United States, and if within
ninety days after the publication of this
notice you fail to contribute your propor
tion of such expenditure as co-owner, your
interest in said claims will become the
property of the subscribers under said sec
hon 2324. L. J. BARNARD.
S. J FRIEDMAN.
Hailey, Idaho. Jan. 14, IS92.
nrst publication, Jan. 30,1892.
I HE INSURANCE
L cure uo sum,
—SECURED IN THE
Mutual Benefit Ufa
Main
ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA.
f he Oldest Mutual Life Insurance 6o$i'
p$ny in tho United fitatss.
CKO. J. LCWI8, Agont.
Fwr Sain Chest]».
A SrstclMtbead fire Engine, apam fete
without b**. -Appte*»' " '
wu
of
b
!
■i
; ' 'fj
.00
2.00
1.00
.50
Sole Representative of the Grtsât tlpÿèl* Wood - River Mining Region.
.15
■items
VOL. XÏI.
KETCHUM, ALTURAS COUNTY, IDAHO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 14, 1893.
■ « — m < a " ■ » ■ ■
NO. 5.
Palace Hetel
a
Ketchum, Ibaho.
JAMES JUDGE, - - Proprietor.
CLASS
IN EVERY RESPECT.
Good Beds & Airy Rooms
I
as
Throughout the houa«.
Nice Sample Rooms
;
For Commercial Traveler«.
A Good Restaurant
in cQDnsct&on with th« hoass.
MEA T MARKET
GOODING BEOS., Prop's,
Main Str«at, opposite First National Bank.
-Oeneral Dealers in
bit, MUTTON,
•w m
BUTCHER'S SUPPLIES, Etc.
I^Preœpt attention given ft town end
eottntry ozdç*.
NOW QB E IS PU RCHASED.
How Smelters Figure on the Price of
Ore and Smelting Chargee.
In reply to a correspondent who
asks how smellers figure on the
smelting charge on ore, or the price
to paid for it, the Mining Industry
gives the following as the usua
rule. Different smelters vary the
method a little, but reach practi
cally the same result.
The ore, when it is received, is
analyzed for silica, iron, lime, zinc,
manganese, or other metalloids or
metals it may contain in addition
to its assay for gold, silver, lead or
copper. Each of these ingredients
is beneficial or injurious in a smel
ting charge. Those which are ben
eficial are credited with a certain
amount for each unit, or per cent,
in which they occur in an ore, and
those which are injurious are
charged with a certain per cent.
•Silica and zinc are charged for, and
iron lime, gold, lead and copper,
when the three latter occur in
quantities too small to be paid for,
are all credited with some value.
Under the scale of prices adopted
by smelters lead, when it occurs' in
a less quantity than' ten per cent.,
ir not paid for. The same is true
as to copper below 2 per cent, and
gold below one-twentieth of an
ounce per ton. The miner usually
supposes that on account of this
schedule of prices he is never paid
for these metals his ore may con
tain, if their quantity falls below
the percentage or value stated. But
he does get pay, in lower smelting
charges.
As for silica and iron, equal
quantities of each are counted as off
setting each other. If sn ore con
tains more silica than iron, it car
ries an excess of silica, and each
unit or per cent, of the excess is
charged for. If it carries more
iron than silica, the excess of the
iron is paid for on the same basis.
At the present time iron excess is
generally paid for at the rate of 15
cents for each unit, and the excess
of silica is charged for at the same
rate.
.76 I
Let it be assumed that an ore
carries silica 30 per cent., iron 20
per cent., lead 8 per cent., zinc 12
per cent., gold 4-100 of an ounce
and silver 100 ounces per ton. The
balance is sulphur, which is mostly
eliminated by roasting, for which
there is a uniform charge oh all ore
requiring roasting of $2.50 per ton.
I In estimating the cost of smelting,
the charge againBt the ore would be
as follows :
$1.50
10 per cent, silica excess
19 per cent, zinc. 6.00
Roasting
Smelting
2 50
4.50
$14.50
.$1.60
Total.
The credits would be:
8 per cent, lead at 20 cents
04 gold at $19 an ounce...
100 oz. silver at 82 c. less 5 per C..77.90
$80.26
14.50
Less
$65.76
As usually stated the silver only
in such ore would be paid for at
95 per cent, of its New York quota
tion on the day of sale. That quo
tation would make its value, as
stated, $77.90 per ton, making the
apparent smelting charge the dif
ference between the two, or $12.14
per ton.
owner of such ore gets pdid for its
lead and gold contents, notwith
standing the buyers do not profess
to pay for them when they are
found in these small quantities.
Of course ore buyers vary their
bids for ore, just as they may need
the particular ore on which they
are bidding. One smelter may need
a silicious ore, while others do not.
In that case the smelter wanting
such ore might not charge the silica
excess with $1.50, in which case his
apparent smelting charge would be
less than that of other smelters
which laid upon it that charge.
Again a smelter might be in such
great need of lead ore that be might
be willing to credit the ore with
more than 20 cents for each unit of
its lead contents, even though it
fell below 10 percent.
Again when different smelters are
bidding on a lot of ore, as they do
on all lots sold through the public
sampling works, each one making
his own analysis, there may be a
difference in the analysis, on silica,
zinc, iron or any other of its con
tents, of even 1 per cent, or a
fraction of an ounce of silver, and
in such cases there will be a cor
responding difference in bids, from
men who calculate on the same
basis, at the same prices. It is thus
that bids on the same ore may
differ considerably.
Small Incomes.
Out of a population of 30^000,000
in Prussia only 2,435,858 persons
possess an income of over 900
merit* a year, which is equal to
about $225. This fact is shown by
the first year's results of the new
income tax jo Prussia. Two million
one hundred and eighteen-thousand
nine hundred and sixty-nine pay
income tax on the lowest seated-'
Price paid per ton
It will be seen that the
to
■ « —
of
that is, on incomes of between 900
and 3000 marks. Only 10,698 per
sona have incomes of over 30,000
marks, or about $7,000 a year. The
higbestincomedeclared is 6,760,000
marks, end from the locality where
it waa registered the person is sup
posed to be Krupp, the gumnnker
of Essen.— N. Y. Sun.
The Moneymakfnn Nose.
who
the
price
the
is
zinc,
or
or
ben
cent,
and
are
cent.
and
in
for,
in
true
and
an
this
But
off
is
the
is
15
I was Very much interested at the
funeral of Jay Gould to note the
wonderful colleotion.of nopes which
le great
financier. They were noses of mep
who had bè«i thé afehitdefo oT their
own fortunes and who have bhilded
piles of large dimension's.
If* you have* a snippy nose, tbs
physiognomists will tell you there
is no use for you to try and make
a fortune. It is not in you. The
men who possess great financiering
genius possess strong and promi
nent nasal organs, with prominent
gathered about the feist o
who possess great financiering
bridges, noses of the aquiline type,
like an eagle's beak. It is not a
question of nationality at all, but
of character, and the company at
Jay Gould's funeral—a very typical
one—proved that the physiogno
mists are right.
The nose of Jay Gould himself
was preeminently a "moneymaking
nose," and in the coffin its charac
teristic showed even more markedly
than in life. It was clean cut and
finely chiseled, and showed strong
courage and inflegible purpose in
its possessor.
But in the room there were a
score of noses just as strong and
foil of the power of acquisition.
Russell Sage has the moneymaking
nose, though it is not so finely
modeled as was that of his dead
friend. Austin Corbin's nasal organ
is as full of strength as a locomo
tive. Henry Clews has the eagle's
beak, but it is somewhat more deli
cately chis8eled and indicates more
generous traits of character.
We are all familiar with the
strong, fine member which Dr. De
pew wears between bis eyes. Al
though he is not a great money
maker, as compared with those I
have mentioned, there is no doubt
of his good sense in matters per
taining to finance, nor any doubt
that he has been a bulwark for the
younger Vanderbilts, who, by the
way, have noses of the aqueline
type themselves. I do not think
there is any danger that Dr. Depew
will go to the poorhouse betwixt
this and Woodlawn.
There were many other noses at
the funeral of the same type. The
names of the owners have escaped
my memory. It was an interesting
study in nasology, and when I went
lome and saw my poor little turn
up proboscis in the looking-glass I
sat me down and wept as one with
out financial hope. 'Tis clear I
I was not cut out to be a millionaire.
— N. Y. Herald.
ore
20
12
ore
be
The Dude and the Mad Dog.
"You cannot always Judge a
book by the cover," said Major Tom
Speedwell to a St. Louis Globe
Democrat reporter. "If any man
at
as
despises a dude I do. I am preju
diced against any man who uses
perfumery, wears a silk hat, a stand
up collar or carries a cane. When
I find a man doing all those ridicu
lous things at one and the same
time it is all that I can do to re
frain from personal violence. I
yearn to hit him just on general
principles. Add to those offenses
against the cannons of horse sense
a button-hole bouquet, a curled
mustache and a lisp, and my fin
gers fairly tingle for & grip of his
neck, my toes for a coup de grace.
" Yet I saw just that kind of a
biped perform an act of heroism
that made me think better of man
kind.
"I was walking down Madison
street, Chicago, last summer, when
there was suddenly raised that most
appalling of ail cries of terror, 'Mad
dog.' An old lady and a little girl
were crossing the street down the
centre of which a big mastiff
was plunging, bloodshot eyes and
foaming mouth, pursued by a
couple of officers. He made straight
for the old lady, caught her dress
and pulled her down. He then
sprang at her throat, but before
he reached it a youngster tricked
out in the toggery that I abhor, had
him by the neck. The beast raged
like a demon, but the dude held
him fast until an officer came up
and put a bullet through hie head.
He then picked up his silk tile,
brushed it with bis elbow, and «aid
with an idiotic lisp : ' Every dog in
the tbity thould be killed ; every
body that keepth a dog in the thity
thould be hanged.' His philosophy
was sound as his nerve. I went
home and wrote with a piece of
chalk across the headboard of my
bed : 'A man may dree» like a d—d
fool, and still have sand and sense
to give a Way.
> »
"Whisky is very right," says the
heading of an article in an .ex
change, on the corner ia whisky.
Woll, nwjnji worm wiU sometimes
tarn : whisky has long been mak
ing men "tight,"
y
>
m < a " ■ » ■ ■
900
per
The
sup
A RU SSIA! BOM AICE.
'A Beautiful Daughter of the Regiment
Married to One of Her Fettere.
Marie Keksholmaskala is mar
ried, says the Warsaw Journal. On
January 12,1877, the grenadiers of
Keksholm, who had taken part in
the battle of Karagatch, were pass
ing in a snow storm through the
Valley of Toundja en route for
Adrianople. The road was strewn
with the half-frozen bodies of dead
men and horses, over which flocks
of raven were soaring. Tbe last
company of the regiment was leav
ing the valley when the soldiers
heard the faint cry of a child. They
halted; a searching party was
the
the
mep
their
tbs r
-formed, and in a heap of ruins they
came upon the dead body of a rich*
The ly dressed and singularly beautiful
Turkish lady.. Her features were
°/ the Circassian type, and the por
tions of her long and crispy hair
which were not covered with the
snow fluttered in the wind. In her
arms she held a baby still alive.
The Captain picked up the little
waif, wrapped it carefully in a
blanket, kissed it, and handed it
carefully to a Lieutenant, with or
ders to have it carefully placed in
one of the warmest wagons and
cared for. Company cooks are re
nowned the world over for their
skill in improvising a meal. The
cook of this company was in a fix.
He didn't know at first what to give
to the baby, but at last, with the
aid of the Doctor, he got over the
difficulty.
At the end of the campaign the
staff decided to adopt the little or
phan, and later on the Empress,
who heard the story, had the little
one placed in the Alexandre-Marie
Institute for Young Ladies, at War
saw. She graduated with high hon
ors, and on leaving the institute
was taken to the home of General
Panioutine, the former Colonel of
the Keksbolm regiment, where she
became a cherished member of his
family, on account of her amiable
disposition, her accomplishments
and her extreme beauty. In 1890
she was presented to the Empress,
who attended to her marriage por
tion, which was also increased by
gifts from the Emperor of Austria,
who is an honorary Colonel of her
regiment, and by the subscriptions
of the officers.
The marriage ceremony was per
formed at Warsaw, and, strange to
say, the bridegroom is one of her
father's, an officer in her regiment.
The bride received the good wishes
of the Governor-General and of
Mme. Gourko. The Colonel of the
regiment offered a toast to Emperor
Francis Joseph of Austria, the hon
orary Colonel, who honored the
feast by the presence of his aid-de
camp, Colonel Klepach. The toast
was received with cheers, and the
band played the Austrian national
hymn. Colonel Klepsch then pre
sented the bride with a present from
his Emperor, a sp
genuine imperial
|y of a rid
ly dressed and singularly beautiful
Turkish lady.. Her features were
a
but
at
in
a
the
Al
I
at
I
I
iindid'bwiKXf
a
genuine imperial gift. Telegrams
from officers and non-commissioned
officers came from many quarters
aud everybody was happy.
I
A Queer Mail Contract.
There is a man in Sugar Grove,
Penn., who is so anxious to engage
in the government employ that he
wants to work for nothing and pay
$53 a year for the privilege. His
name is Sevant Rickers, and he
asks to carry the United States
mails from Sugar Grove to James
town, N. Y., and back, nine and
a quarter miles, six times a week,
and he wants to pay $53 ayear
the contract. Under, thé .present
contract the mails are being carried
on this route at a cost of 1 cent a
year. When the bids were invited
for the next four years Rickers aud
another bidder each offered to do the
work for one cent. They must
have compared notes, however, for
before the bids were opened, Rick
ers' opponent submitted a supple
mental bid, offering to pay $20 a
year for the contract. Rickers then
offered $30 ; his opponent raieed to
$40 ; Rickers finally raised to $53,
at which figure the contract will be
awarded. The willingness of these
men to work for nothing and pay
for the privilege is explained by
the fact that the mail-carrier can
make a handsome profit by carry
ing passengers, baggage, express
and light freight. There are many
mail routes throughout the country
where tbe service is dom at a cost
to the government far below the
actual expense of doing the work if
nothing but the mail was earned,
and yet the contractors, as a rale,
find the business profitable on ac
count of the other business they
are enabled to carry in connection
with it. The route from Sugar
Grove to Jamestown is the only
one on which the Government ac
tually receives money from the
contractor.—Washington Corr. St,
Louis Globe-Demoerat.
for
a
Ch OQP Livi ng.
An immense dining hfU for stu
dents, to ho known ns the Menas.
Academics, was opened in Vienna I
Inst week, fn it 2,000 students cnn |
>
\
dine together. Tbe intent of the
institution is to enable student«
Ä" at ' nun 1 1 1 m J u T' COSt m
stead of being compelled, by reason
of their small means, to obtain their
meals in cbeap^ and low raforta,
The privileges pl the Mensa Acad
emica are restricted to regular sub
scribers, and the rates are, for dm
JnA
a/ dl T r v 8Upper
14 75 a mouth. N. Y. Sun.
mar
On
of
in
pass
the
for
dead
last
leav
They
was
they
rich*
were
por
hair
the
her
little
a
it
or
in
and
re
their
The
fix.
give
the
the
the
or
of
she
his
por
by
her
per
to
her
of
the
the
the
The Protection of Aged Parents.
There is no more pathetic object
in life than an old, dependent
son, whose life is finished ; who
lives from day to day with no spec
ial purpose or ambition to stimu
late life ; simply waiting for the grim
messenger,- whose certain call
constantly expected by them. Some
people seem to think that the sens
ibilities of such old people become
callous; that they are indifferent
to slights and inattention; that
they can put up with inferior ac
commodations and few comforts
with much less inconvenience than
the younger members of the fami
ly. But instead, I think the feel
ings of such ones become painfully
sensitive. Their dependent condi
tion is galling to the last degree. If
they do not complain it is not from
indifference, but because they know
complaining would be unavailing.
The lessons of patience they have
learned in the hard school of life
stand them in good stead in the
final trial. Is it not enough that
old persons must bear the pain
ful consciousness that life ia about
over ; that the once vigorous body
has become feeble and inactive;
the quick mental faculties dark
ened by a cloud and tbe physical
beauty that charmed the eye has
withered at the touch of age? Is
it not enough that ail this should be
borne, without being made to feel
that there is no welcome spot or
willing care for them in life? The
protection of aged parents by their
children is one of the beautiful and
just claims of nature. And the
son or daughter who, through greed
and selfishness, refuses to bestow
such care when needed is an ungrate
ful and unnatural exception in the
human family.—Boston Transcript.
The Presidential Succession.
per
were
"Correspondent is informed that
should Mr. Cleveland die before the
second Monday in January next
the electoral colleges would have
to elect some other person to the
presidency. They have a legal right
to do that in any event, as there is
no restriction upon their choice ex
cept in regard to the qualifications
laid down in the Constitution.
Should Mr. Cleveland be elected
President by the electoral colleges
in January and Mr. Stevenson Vice
President, and the former should die
between that time and the first of
March, Mr. Stevenson would be the
^President. Tbi. contingency ia pro
vided for in the 12th amendment
to the constitution, which declares
that in case of a failure to elect a
President or in case of a vacancy
in the office from any other cause
the Vice-President shall act.
Article 2, section 1, of the Con
stitution confers upon the Congress
the right to declare what officer
shall act as President in case of
vacancy in both the offices of Pres
ident and Vice-President. This was
done by the act of Congress ap
proved February 3, 1887, and the
succession is in the following order :
Secretary of State, Secretary of the
Treasury, Secretary of War, Attor
ney-Genera), Secretary of the Navy,
and Secretary of the Interior.—Bal
timore Sun.
he
he
a
a
Stopping a Hiccough.
"Why don't vou stop that hic
coughing?" «aid a gentleman to a
friend, who for some momenta had
been subjected to the annoying con
vulsive movement of the diaphragm.
"I wish I could," gasped the vic
tim, "but ijts no go. A fellow triad
to scare me—said my coat was on
fixe—knew it wasn't^awallowed
nine times nine swallows of water
—no go—feel like a washed out
hand engine,he ejaculated, an
grily, having told his woes in dis
jointed utterances and between
cottghs.
"Well, you me a chump," re
marked the first speaker. "Come
with me," and he led hie friend into
an adjoining restaurantapd ordered
a heaping spoonful of powdered
sugar.
Corns, ha said, "swallow this all
The victim did *° siow
at ones.
ly, and found to his intense surprise
and relief When the operation was
completed that the hie coughs had
vanished.
"Now," remarked the first gen
tleman, "for teaohiag you that
remedy I'll taka just otae cigar with
you. It is not n port of tbs
csss, but it's Worth the pries,
it? As for thesngerl have
known it to foil to cuts even thé
most stubborn case of hiccough* :
—►New York Hflëaüd.
pro
is't
never
I 1
| per
TT^
n
I bf isihors nre fi
hole nUtabor.
it
!
Tut iXàtetoa* it.the «Il rfearésriétàtit»
of Um Omt U
u4 SÉolÿ iàUiitf tetkms arnl; loeaWd
M ii'i* in Oie rtrj Kwt ôf tlie moÿt jmm»
i*ibg mining country ou Um' face of' tbe
and leaving nothing undone topn
mnt iti readers a complete qrnopiil of all
mining news and developments, ai well aa
matters 6i local importance in and about
Ketebnii it ia an invaluable-guide for cap
ital and informant to. the settler of every
craft and position. Subscribe for it, read
it, and let your friends read it.
Wood Mete. Sa wt ooth
the 8tewert Defends surer,
to A ap6cial to tbe 8an Francisco
m * Chronicle from Washington, dated
j anuary m B . J8 ; Senator Stew
their ar ^ ma( fo an exhaustive argument
j n the Senate to-day against the re
p^j 0 f tf,« ac t of 1890 and in favor
sub- coinage. He said that half
dm- the gold pr ^ acod came from silver
JnA mines that the entire output of
8° ld WM annually used in the arts.
' The repeal of the act would so crip
pU> M to cut off h£f
tbe supply of gold. The arts would
then rapidly absorb the coin gold
and the contraction would be
ruinous.
Every attempt to buy gold from
Europe by selling wheat and cot
ton cheaper than they could be ob
tained elsewhere would, he declared,
be met with sales of our securities,
of which Europe held $5,000,000,
000. The price of cominoditiea
would be ruuiously low before
could get out of debt to Europe
and make & contest on equal terme.
The gold advocates admitted there
was not gold enough, but preferred
their profits on the rise of gold
honest money and financial pros
perity.
The people at tbe last election,
Stewart said, voted for no princi
ple but change. The republicans
would not agree to a change, while
the democrats promised to change
the tariff schedules. The voters de
cided that no change could be for
tbe worse and that any change
might be beneficial. Over 1,000,000
voters, without hope of success,
protested by voting for Weaver.
Others stayed at home in apathy
or disgust, but enough voted to
defeat Harrison and elect Cleveland.
If the democratic
who
spec
grim
is
that
ac
feel
If
life
the
that
has
Is
be
feel
or
The
the
the
per
we
to
party would re
monetize silver and give relief its
lease of power would be indefinite,
but if it failed and tbe corner on
gold was maintained both the old
parties would be overwhelmed at
the next election. The demand
for the repeal of the act of 1890 was
to degrade silver, destroy its market
and prevent its remonetization.
"The silver cause," continued
Senator Stewart, "is a struggle for
l iberty against the usurpation of
the gold kings. The success of the
gold combination means fudal lords
and dependent serfs."
The success of the gold party
believes, had been achieved b
cunning which was no more justi
fiable than brute force. The peo
{ fie would first try the force of bal
ots against this cunning and if it
failed the gold kings must take
warning. Accumulations of cun
ning were always in danger of
physical force. It was a part of
wisdom to do justice, obtain wealth
by fair means and avoid dangerous
discontent.
A Convenient Brother.
It is a serious offense for a Ger
man soldier to appear in public ex
cept in uniform. Even when he is
on a furlough he must always wear
it.
A certain Lieutenant Schmidt,
who was engaged in some adven
ture or other dressed up as a civil
ian, was having a fine time of it,
when on turning a corner he unex
pectedly met his colonel.
Lieutenant Schmidt, however,did
not lose his presence of mind, but
iu a changed voice asked, "Can you
tell me, sir, where Lieutenant
Schmidt lives? I am his brother
from the country and am paying
him a visit."
Tbe colonel gave the desired in
formation, mid Lieutenant Schmidt
tarried home and got into bis uni
form as fest as possible. He thought
lie had deceived his superior officer,
but the next day when he met hie
colonel the latter said :
"Lieutenant Schmidt, if your
brother from the countrv pays you
another visit, I'll have him placed
ih close confinement for thirty
day*."
, he
y a
the
the
is
ex
of
a
of
:
a
A pair of boots has 2000 stitches.
The population
creases by 7,000 people a day.
The progeny of two rabbits will
amount in two years to 70,000,000.
Every president of tbe United
States has either been a lawyer or
of America in
soldier or both.
Pet dogs are now furnished frith
shoes for the purpose of protecting
polished floors.
Out of a total of 613 known spe
cies of snim*U in Africa, 472 of
them are to be found in no other
oountry.
The ordinary folding fan is said
to have keen invented in japan in
the Seventh century hy a native
artist, who derived the ides from
the way in which tbs hat closes its
When a child dies in Greenland
the native« bury a live dog ritk it*
thedog to boused by the child SO
0 guidq to the other world. Whew
qu Mini 4 in regard to tM« SOMO
stitiesA, 4hey will only toriw : *4
dog can find fos way any wb«o"
Ttoto frrtriltbMi ...
b; { W- fW
o -ftéfetasé Mwf
tifts Wdt ea
éà
them;

xml | txt