OCR Interpretation


The Kendrick gazette. [volume] (Kendrick, Idaho) 1892-1968, November 22, 1918, Image 3

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091096/1918-11-22/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

ESSENTIAL THAT FARMER SAVE EVERY
BIT OF FARM MANURE DURING WINTER
? • ■
Sag* *
PROPER WAY TO APPLY MANURE TO LAND.
(Prepared by the United States Depart
ment of Agriculture.)
Late fall—any time before the
ground freezes—on most farms Is the
easiest time to provide for making the
gnost out of the home supply of manure.
And this year, when commercial fertil
izers are high In price or Impossible to
obtain, It Is doubly essential that we
save every bit of the farm manure.
"Apply as fast as made" Is the best
rule before the ground freezes, and
even later than that on level ground.
But In hilly sections the farmers
doubtless are right in thinking there
is too much loss from the manure
washing down the hillsides after the
ground freezes, or on the snow. Then,
too, in the North the snow Is some
times too deep for hauling to be prac
ticable.
Pit for Storing.
Most literature on the subject of pit
building for manure storage is based
on using concrete for material. While
this will usually pay if capital Is avail
able, many farmers feel they do not
have the money to put into it. Fortu
nately there are other ways that will
help greatly with little or no cash ex
pense. If a roof is already available
under which to store the manure, the
ground should be leveled, or, better,
made to slope toward the center. Then,
If the soil is sandy or loamy, the sur
face should be removed to a depth of
Blx Inches or so and the heaviest clay
procurable put in. After spreading a
IpäyöfTce
OF IMPORTANCE
Cost of Harvesting and Storing
Not Great Compared to
Comfort It Brings.
PATRIOTIC DUTY OF FARMER
Will Help Relieve Drain on City Sup
ply and on Transportation—Af
fords Protection for Many
* Perishable Products.
(Prepared by the United States Depart
ment of Agriculture.)
Every farmer who can put up natur
al ice should plan to do so this win
ter as a patriotic duty. Each farm ice
house will help relieve the drain on
the city supply and on transportation,
and will guarantee protection for the
dairy products and other perishables
from the farm when warm weather
comes again.
Save Fuel Supply.
These war times make heavy de
mands upon the fuel supply of the
country and, paradoxical as it may
eeem, It takes fuel to produce artificial
ice, while natural ice may be harvest
ed at a time when farm work is not
pressing and both man and horse labor
are not otherwise profitably employed,
Ice is one of those 1 luxuries which in
many sections of the country can be
had for the gathering. The cost of
harvesting and storing it is not great !
as compared with the comfort that it
b rln £ Si
• Important in Country.
* An ample supply of Ice Is of greater
economic importance in the country j
home than in the city residence. City
people can purchase perishable sup
plies as needed, but the remoteness of
country homes from markets often ren
ders it- necessary to use canned,
corned, or smoked meat products dur
ing the season of the year when the
table should be supplied with fresh
Farmer's Ice House With Milk Room.
meats. Not only is the use of ice im
couple of inches of clay It should be
wetted and thoroughly tamped down.
This process should be repeated until
the desired height Is obtained. The
outside rim may well be a foot or more
higher than the center, this depending
on the size of the pit and the ease of
access for hauling away the manure.
While such a bottom will hold much
of the liquid, It is better to cover It
with some absorbent material—dry
loam is good if bedding Is scarce. Do
not use wood ashes, but coal ashes are
harmless if screened. Continue to use
enough loam to prevent any liquid
from oozing from the pile, which
should be kept" level, moist and well
tamped. Horse manure, unless mixed
with that from cows or hogs, should
be wetted thoroughly—but not enough
to drain out—in order to keep it from
heating, as heating causes a heavy
loss.
Keep Under Roof.
If there Is no roof under which to
keep the manure, a cheap one should
be built. This may be a one-slope
"lenn-to" along the outside of the
barn, a cheap shed with sides, or sim
ply four heavy, high posts on which
a roof slides up or down according to
the height of the manure—such as is
used in some sections for outdoor hay
stacks.
If you can't do all these things, do
what you can. It will help you and the
couritry not only during the war but
ifter the war.
portant In the preservation of fresh
meats, butter, and other table supplies,
but the production of high-grade do
mestic dniry products is almost impos
sible without it. Many markets to
which milk is now shipped demand
that it be coqled before shipment to a
degree not attainable without the use
of Ice.
(Prepared by the United States Depart
ment of Agriculture.)
The cost of machinery and imple
ments Is constantly increasing. Pre
pare now to protect implements and
machinery from exposure during the
coming winter. As far as possible all
implements should be placed under a
dry shed. Woodwork should be paint
ed and all exposed iron and steel
parts should be either painted or cov
ered with grease or oil to prevent
rusting.
Lei and Items
Plowing has been the order for
quite awhile. A number of the far
niers have finished, while some are
still seeding
The weather is all one could ask
for fall work.
Our community seems well favor
ed as no new cases of "flu" have
developed. The school will open
on Monday the 25th, according to
reports from the "state board of
health
Cupid has been busy in.and about
Leland of late. Oriel Craig and
Betty Robison betook them to Lew
iston last Sunday and were enroute
on^lhe sea of blissful matrimony
on Monday morning by his Judge
ship— Mr. Bollinger.
The contagion was followed by
other victims, Eddie Johnson and
Mary Hoffman becoming 'inoculat
ed, within a few days resorted to
A s °tin, where the aid of Rev- W.
Lowery of the Presbyterian church,
they, to ° were unlted ' in marriage.
The drive for the various war
f unc ) s was the order last week, and
as usua ] the slackers showed a left
i ianc j. Oh, ye slacker!
Our mail carrier seems to have
his troubles. One clay last week as
he was on his way tc*Kendrick with
his budget, a young horse he was
driving concluded he would short
cut the grade anu in his antics
succeeded in pushing the wagon
! over the grade. No damage Te
ported.
Verne Flcshman and family will
leave in a few days for Wattsburg,
Wash., to spend the winter.
j _
Concerning Men of 37 Years
"No. B-4304. J Retel E-3250, to all
Governors. Immediately instruct
all Local and District Boards that
in carrying out the order for the
Secretary of War given in my El-2350
which dieted t .hat the Boards
should immediately discontinue all
work connected with the classifica
tion of men who on September 12th,
1918 had reached their thirty
seventh birthday, such boards shall
at once make a suitable public an
nouncement of and also post in a
conspicious place in their offices, a
public notice which shall read as
follows: "The President directs
that registrants who on September
12th, 1918, had attained their
thirty-seventh birthday and who
have received questionnaires need
not fill out such questionnaires but
they are immediately to return such
documents to their Local boards.
No charge of delinquency will be
entered against and such registrant
for his failure heretofore to fill out
and return his questionnaire even
though the time set for such return
is now passed, any all charges of
delinquency theretofore entered
against such registrant of such ages
Lowest Prices
On Toys, Dolls, dishes, trains, wheel goods,
blackboards etc. Teddy Bears made of the
best plush—regular price $1,00, now 75c.
Rubbers Are Necessary
As a great deal of sickness is caused by neg
lecting this important factor. Ladies' toe rub
bers, low heel and high heel. Children's rub
bers, all sizes.
Men's Low and High Top Rubbers
For Thanksgiving and Xmas
Nuts of all Kinds
Walnuts ------- 40c
Filberts, Almonds. Brazil nuts Pecans and
Peanuts
Baker Depatment Store
THE
GREAT EDISON
LlgMinag System
TM
U)
We invite inspection of this wonderful little farm-home light
iny plant. We have tried to have one of the systems set up so it
could be seen in actual operation but the last two orders were sold
before their arrival. If you are interested in a plant stop at the
r KENDRICK SERVICE STATION
who have failed to return their
questionnaires within the time
limits set for will be canceled and
made of no effect."
Local Board for the County of
Latah.
FORE SALE 25 8-weeks old pigs.
J. C. Hamil. 46k3t.
Chamberlain's Cough Remedy
Do not imagine that because other
cough medicines failed to give you
relief that it will he the same with
Chamberlain's Cough Remedy. Bear
in mind that from a small begin
ning this remedy has gained a
world wide reputation and immense
sale. A medicine must have excep
tional merit to win esteem where
ever it becomes known.
We Have The Stock
Just because the other fellow
is out, don't give up. If it is to
eat, nine times out of ten you
can get it here.
Why Bother
To run around to find what you need to supply
that table of yours. Let us supply it complete
with the best eatables obtainable. Rest assured
that if we do not have it, it is hard to get, indeed.
For Thanksgiving Day
We have fancy Raisins, Figs, Nuts, Pickles,
Cranberries, Mince Meat and in fact anything
you need to make the occasion a grand success.
Closed All Day Thursday
Let's forget business for the day and Give Thanks
«m
"The Home of Good Eats''
Helps Keep Down
Living Expenses
Crescent 99 Coffee is a mighty good
coffee—any time—any place.
Its fine flavor is not surpassed by many cof
fesmuch higher in price.
Every pound oï "99" means a saving—it
sells at jusjt 25c a pound.
Ask Your Grocer

xml | txt