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The Kendrick gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho) 1892-1968, November 11, 1921, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091096/1921-11-11/ed-1/seq-4/

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W. A. Rothwell, M. D.
Pkjriiciu utd Surgeon
Office Stela leak BoiUiac
Kendrick,
Idaho.
KENDRICK LODGE NO. 26.
JT A. F. <EL A. m.
yfiÄ Meets every second and
eÆLlast Thursday .of the month
E. W. Lutz. W. M.
A. V. Dunkle, Sécrétera.
Regular Meals 40c
Short Orders
all day
Prompt Service;
Lunches Served Any Time
Mrs. Minnie McDowell
N. R. Shepherd
The Auctioneer
TROY,
IDAHO.
BLACKSMITH
First class work done
Years of Experience
Wm. Meyer
KENDRICK, IDAHO
Barber Shop
Courteous Treatment
Satisfaction
Guaranteed
William Rogers
WAGNER'S GARAGE
HASSLER SHOCK
ABSORBERS
The proper equipment for all
Ford cars and trucks.
Autos Repaired
or
Overhauled
Oxy Acetylene Welding
and Lathe Work
'Charges Reasonable]
All work is guaranteed
Terms Cash
Residence Phone 726
Kendrick Dray and Ice Co.
Frank Chamberlain. Prop.
Hagan & Cushing
Butchers and Packers
If you have anything to sell in beef
pork or mutton.
Phone 17
Moscow, Idaho
Price on top hogs this week 9ie
F. 0. B. Moscow
A. H. OVERSMlTH
Attorner-at-Law
Urquhart'Building Third Stre.t
Moscow, Idaho
Dr. S. A. Roe
Practice Limited to Diseases of the
Eye, Ear, Noae and Throat
Glasses Fitted
Office Over Beach's Store
LEWISTON. IDAHO
WEBSTER
-MAN'S MAN
&
Peter B.Kyne
Author of "Cappy
Rieka," "The Valley
oi the Giants," Eta
CunteVMûtkid
CHAPTER TV.—At Buenaventura, capi
tal of Sobrante, Billy Geary, ill ami pen
niless, is living on the charity of "Mother
Jenks," keeper of a dramshop. She re
ceives a cablegram from Dolores, telling
of her coming.
CHAPTER V.—Dolores' father, Ricardo
Ruey, president of Sobrante, had been
killed in a revolution led by Sarros, the
present executive. Dolores, a child of
eight, was smuggled out of the country
by Mother Jenks and supported by her
In the United States. The old woman,
ashamed of her occupation and habits of
life, fears to meet Dolores, and sends
Geary to the boat to say she has gone
to the United States.
(Chapter VI Continued)
"What's a human life to a doctor?
Besides, he's on the slush-fund pay
roll and does whatever the hlgherups
tell him. You be guided by what I tell
you. Miss Ruey, and do not set foot
on Sobrnntean soil. If you stay
aboard La Estrelllta, you'll have your
nice clean stateroom, your well
cooked meals, your bath, and the at
tentions of the stewardess. The steam
er will be loaded In two days; then
you go back to New Orleans, and by
the time you arrive there I'll have
been In communication by cable with
Mother .Tenks—I mean—"
"Mother who?" Dolores demanded.
"A mere slip of the tongue, Miss
Ruey. I was thinking of my landlady.
I meant Mrs. Wilkins—"
Tin so awfully obliged to you, Mr.
Geary. You're so kind. I'm sure I'd
be a most ungrateful girl not to be
guided by you accordingly. You
wouldn't risk any friend of yours In
this terrible place, would you, Mr.
Geary ?"
"Indeed, I would not. By permitting
anybody I thought anything of to come
to this city, I should feel guilty of
murder."
"I'm sure you would, Mr. Geary.
Nevertheless, there Is one point that Is
not quite clear in my mind, and I wish
you'd explain—■"
"Command me, Miss Ruey."
"If this Is such a frightful place,
why are you so anxious, If I may em
ploy such language, to hornswoggle
your dearest friend, Mr. John S. Web
ster, Into coming down here? Do you
want to kill him and get his money—
or what?"
Billy's face flamed at thought of the
embarrassing trap his glib tongue had
led him Into. He cursed himself for
a star-spangled jackass, and while he
was engaged In this Interesting pas
time Dolores spoke again.
"And by the way, which Is It? Miss
Wilkins or Mrs.? You've called her
both, nnd when I reminded you she
was a Miss, you ngreed with me,
whereas she is nothing of the sort.
She's a Mrs. Then you blurted out
something about a Mother Jenks, nnd
finally, Mr. Geary, It occurs to me that
for a complete stranger you are un
duly Interested In my welfare. I'm
not such a goose as to assimilate your
weird tales of death from disease. It
occurs to me that If your friend John
S. Webster can risk Buenaventura, I
can also."
"You—you know thnt old tarantu
la?" Billy gnsped. "Why I—I «une
out to warn him off the grass, too."
Dolores walked a step closer to Billy
and eyed him disapprovingly. "I'm so
sorry I can't believe that statement,"
she replied. "It happens that I wns
standing by the compauion-ladder
when you came aboard and spoke to
tbe purser; when you asked him If Mr.
Webster wns aboard, your face was
alight with eagerness nnd antlci|>utlon,
but when you had reason to believe he
was not aboard, you looked so terribly
disappointed I felt sorry for you.
"I'm going ashore, if It's the last act
of my life, nnd wlien I get there I'm
going to Interview the cable agent;
then I'm going to call at the steam
ship office and scan the passenger list
of the last three north-bound steam
ers, and If I do not find Henrietta Wil
kins' nume on one of those passenger
lists I'm going up to Calle de Coto
cordia No. 19—"
"I surrender unconditionally,"
groaned Billy. "I'm a liar from be
ginning to end. I overlooked my hand.
I beg of you to believe me, however,
when 1 tell you that I only told you
those whoppers because I was In
honor hound to tell them. Personally,
I don't want you to go away—at least,
not until I'm ready to go away, too!
Miss Ruey, my nose Is in the dust.
There Is a fever In my brain and a
misery In my heart—"
"And contrition In your face," she
interrupted him laughingly. "You're
forgiven, Mr. Geary — on one condi
tion."
"Name it," he answered.
"Tell me everything from beginning
to end."
So Billy told her. "I would much
rather have been visited with a plague
of boils, like our old friend, the late
Job, than have to tell you this. Miss
Ruey." he concluded his recital. "Man
proposes, but God. disposes, and you're
here and bound to learn the truth
sooner or later. Mother Isu't a lady
and she knows It, but take It from
me. Miss Ruey, she's s grand old
piece of work. She's s scout —• ria«
tafled spon—a regu.n. individual and
game as a gander."
"And I mustn't call at El Buen Ami
go, Mr. Geary?"
"Perish the thought ! Mother must
call on you. El Buen Amigo Is what
you might terra a hotel for tropical
tramps of the masculine sex. Nearly
all of Mother's guests have a past,
you know. They're the submerger!
white tenth of Sobrante.
"Then my benefactor must call to
see me here?" Billy nodded. "When
will you bring her here?"
Billy reflected that Mother Jenks
had been up rather late the night be
fore and that trade in the cantina
of El Buen Amigo had been unusually
brisk ; so since he desired to exhibit
the old lady at her best, he concluded
It might be well to spar for wind.
"Tomorrow at 10," he declared. Do
lores inclined her head. Something
told her she had better leave all future
details to the amiable William.
"I remember you inquired for your
friend, Mr. Webster, when you came
aboard the steamer."
"I remember It, too." Billy countered
ruefully. "I can't Imagine what's be
come of him. Miss Ruey, did you
ever go to meet the only human being
In tbe world and discover that for
some mysterious reason he had failed
to keep the appointment? Miss Ruey.
you'll have to meet old John Stuart
I he minute he lights In Buenaventura.
He's some boy."
"Old John Stuart?" she queried.
"How old?"
"Oh, thirty-nine or forty on actual
count, but one of the kind that will
live to be a thousand and then have
to be killed with an axe. He's com
ing to Sobrante to help me put over a
mining deal."
"How interesting, Mr. Geary! No
wonder you were disappointed."
The last sentence was a shaft delib
erately launched ; to Dolores' delight
It made a keyhole in Billy Geary's
heart.
"Don't get me wrong. Miss Ruey,"
he hastened to assure her. "I have a
good mine, but I'd trade it for a hand
shake from Jack ! The good Lord only
published one edition of Jack, and
limited the edltlou to one volume;
then the plates were melted for the
Junk we call the human race. Two
weeks ago, when I was sick and pen
niless and despairing, the possessor of
a concession on a fortune, but with
out a centavo In my pockets to buy a
banana, when I was a veritable beach
comber nnd existing on the charity of
Mother Jenks, I managed finally to
communicate with old Jack and told
him where I was nnd what I had.
There's Ills answer. Miss Ruey, and
I'm not ashamed to say that when I
got It I cried like a kid." And Billy
handed her John Stuart Webster's re
markable cablegram, the receipt of
which had, for Billy Geary, trans
formed nlglit Into day. purgatory into
paradise. Dolores read It.
"No wonder you love him." she de
clared, and added artlessly: "His
wife must simply adore him."
"'He has no wife to bother his life,
so he paddles bis own canoe,' " Billy
recited. "I don't believe tbe old sour
dough has ever been in love with any
thing more charming than the goddess
of fortune. He's woman-proof."
"About Mrs. Jenks," Dolores contin
ued, abruptly changing the subject.
"How nice to reflect that after she
hud trusted you and believed in you
when you were penniless, you were
enabled to Justify her faith."
"You bet!" Billy declared. "I feel
that I can never possibly hope to
catch even with the old Samaritan,
although I did try to show her how
much 1 appreciated her."
"I dare say you went right out and
bought her au impossible hat." Dolores'
challenged roguishly.
"No, I didn't, for a very sufficient
reason. Down here the ladies do not
wear hats. But I'll tell you what I did
buy her, Miss Ruey—and # oh. by
George, I'm glad now I did It. She'll
wear them tomorrow when I bring her
to see you. I bought her a new black
silk dress and an old-lace collar, and
a gold breast pin and a tortoise shell
hair comb and hired an open carriage
and took her for an evening ride on
the Malecon to listen to the band con
cert."
"Did she like that?"
"She ate it up." Billy declared with
conviction. "I think It was her first
adventure lu democracy."
Billy's pulse wus still far from nor
mal when he reached El Buen Amigo,
for he was infused with a strange,
new-found warmth that burned like
malarial fever, hut wasn't. He wasted
no preliminaries on Mother Jenks. but
bluntly acquainted her with the facts
In the case.
Mother Jenks eyed him a moment
wildly. "Gord's truth !" she gasped :
she reached for her favorite elixir, but
Billy got the bottle first.
"Nothing doing," he warned this
strange publican. "Mother, you're
funking It—and what would your
sainted 'Enery say to that? Do you
want that angei to kiss you anti get •
whiff of this brandy?"
Mother Jenks' eyes actually popped.
"Gor 1 , WHlie," she gaspad, "'aven't HI
told ye she's a lydy ! Me kiss tbe lamb I
HI trust, Mr. Geary, as 'ow I knows
my place an' can keep It."
"Yes. I know," Billy soothed the
frightened old woman, "but the trouble
is Miss Dolores doesn't know hers—
$nd something tells me If she does.
She'll forget IL She'll take you In her
arms and kiss you. sure as death and
taxes."
And she did ! "My lamb, my lamb,"
sobbed Mother Jenks the next morn
ing, and rested her old cheek, with Its
rum-begotten hue, close to the rose
tinted Ivory cheek of her wurd. "Me
—wot I am—an' to think-"
"You're a sweet old dear," Dolores
whispered, patting the gray head;
"and I'm going to call you Mother."
"Mr. William H. Geary," the girl
remarked that night, "I know now why
your friend, Mr. Webster, sent that
Cablegram. I think you're a scout,
too."
For reasons best known to himself
Mr. Geary blushed furiously. "I—I'd
better go nnd break the news to Moth
er," he suggested Inanely. She held
out her hand ; and Billy, having been
long enough In Sobrante to have ac
quired the habit, bent his malarial
person over that hand and kissed It.
As he went out it occurred to him
that had the lobby of the Hotel Ma
teo been paved with eggs, he must
have floated over them like a wraith,
so light did he feel within.
CHAPTER VII.
Webster reached New Orleans at
the end of the first leg of his Journey,
to discover that he was one day late
to board the Atlanta—a banana, boat
of the Consolidated Fruit company's
line plying regularly between New Or
leans and that company's depots at
Limon and San Buenaventura—which
necessitated a wait of three days for
the steamer La Estrelllta of the Ca
ribbean Mall line, running to Caracas
and way ports.
He decided to visit the ticket office
of the Caribbean Mall line Immediate
ly and avoid the rush in case the
travel should be heavy.
The steamship office was In Canal
street. The clerk was waiting on two
well-dressed and palpably low-bred
sons of the tropics, to whom he had
just displayed a passenger list which
the two were scanning critically.
Their interest in It was so obvious
that unconsciously Webster peeped
over their shoulders (no difficult task
for one of his stature) and discovered
it to be the passenger list of the
steamer La Estrelllta. They were con
versing together in low tones and Web
ster, who had spent many years of
his life following his profession In
Mexico, recognized their speech as the
bastard Spanish of the peon.
He sat down in the long wall seat
and waited until the pair, having com
pleted their scrutiny of the list, turned
to pass out. He glanced at them cas
ually. One was a tall thin man whose
bloodshot eyes were inclined to "pop"
a little—Infallible evidence In the
Latin-Amerlcan that he Is drinking
more hard liquor than Is good for him.
His companion was plainly of the
same racial stock, although Webster
suspected him of a slight admixture
of negro blood. He was short, stocky,
and aggressive looking; like his com
panion, bejeweled and possessed of a
thin, carefully cultivated moustache
that seemed to consist of about nine
teen hairs on one side aud twenty on
the other. Evidently once upon a
time, as the story hooks have it. he
had been shot. Webster suspected a
Mauser bullet, fired at long range. It
had entered Ills right cheek, just be
low tlie malar, ranged downward
through liis mouth and out through
a fold of flabby flesh under his left
jowl. It must have been a frightful
wound, but it had healed well except
at the point of entrance, where it had
a tendency to pucker considerably,
thus drawing the man's eyelid down
on his cheek and giving to that visual
organ something of the appearance of
a bulldog's.
Webster gazed after them whimsi
cally as he approached the counter.
"I'd hate to wake up some night
and find that lionibre with the puck
ered eye leaning over me. By the
way," he continued, suddenly appre
hensive. "do you get much of that
paraqueet travel on your line?"
"About 80 per cent, of It ts off color,
sir."
Webster pondered the 80-per-cent,
probability of being berthed in the
same stateroom with one of thqse
people and the prospect was as re
volting to him as would be an unin
vited negro guest at the dining table of
a southern family. He hod all a
Westerner's hatred for the breed.
"Well. I want a ticket to San Buena
ventura," he informed the clerk, "but
I don't relish the idea of a Greaser in
the same stateroom with me. I won
der If you couldn't manage to fix me
with a stateroom all to myself, or at
least arrange It so that In the event
of company I'll draw a white man."
"I'm sorry, sir, but I cannot guar
antee you absolute -privacy nor any
kind of white man. It's pretty mixed
travel to all Central American ports."
"How many berths in your first
class staterooms?"
"Two."
Webster smiled brightly. He had
found a way out of the difficulty. 'Til
buv 'em both, son." he announced.
"I cannot sell you an entire state
room. sir. It's against the orders of
the company to sell two berths to
one man. The travel Is pretty brisk
and it's hardly fair to Hie public, you
know "
(To be continued)
The Farmers Elevator
And Warehouses
Will pay highest market prices for gram and sells
Binder Twine and all kinds of feed at the lowest
possible margin.
We also handle the celebrated
Martin's Best
FLOUR
Every Sack Guaranteed
Our aim is to treat you Q the year O
Kendrick Rochdale Co.
Y ©null Meed Monney
When Opportunity Comes
This country is full of splendid business op
portunities for the young man. Somewhere
sometime your chance will come.
At such a time even a tew hundred dol
lars, carefully saved and banked will help
enormously, because the only sound way to
start any proposition is to finance it in part
yourself.
Save- your money. Start r Savings
Account at this bank, now, and be ready
when your opportunity comes.
One Dollar or More
Starts an Account at this Bank
THE FARMERS BANK
Money Makes Money
Interest on investment is
the source of surest income.
Money worKs 24 hours a.
day and seven days a
weeK.
More people are made inde
pendent by saving than by
slaving.
England has invested to
wonderful advantage. Ev
ery year statistics show
that England buys more
from other countries than
she sells to them. .But inter
est on investments does not
show in the statistical tables.
That is why England is rich.
Money placed in a savings banh is an in
vestment safe and sure
MaKe yourself independent.
One Dollar Starts an Account l
Kendrick State Bank
Kendrick, Idaho

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