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The Grangeville globe. [volume] (Grangeville, Idaho) 1907-1922, November 07, 1918, Image 6

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091099/1918-11-07/ed-1/seq-6/

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SERVICE and QUALITY
LADY ASSIT ANT AT ALL TIMES
THE MODERN FUNERAL PARLORS
A. J. MAUGG
FUNERAL FURNISHER
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and
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PHONE ORDERS TO LAMM DRUG (X).
Pacific Phone 93
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Smoke House
The
CARL CARLTON, Prop.
NEWS DEPOT and BOWLING ALLEYS
CIGARS and TOBACCOS
Columbia Graphophonei and Record«
Mn for All Magazines and Periodicals at
Publishers* Prices.
be
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U
GIVEN SPECIAL ATTENTION
AUTO REPAIRING
SPRING WORK—NEW SPRINGS BUILT
WHEEL WORK—BODIES BUILT, ET0.
H. E. ARLEDGE
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Prompt Service
First-class Workmanship
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CONVEYANCING
ABSTRACTS OF TITLE
H. ROTHWELL
Leasee and Manager
Si ;;
I Abstract Department Orangeville Savings & Trait Go.
Orangeville, Idaho.
THE BRADBURY
Spokesman-Review Agency
Both Phone*
*
NOTICE WATER CONSUMERS
Sprinkling season opens July 1st., and closes-October
An extra charge will be made for sprinkling ont
; 1st.
■ of season.
SPRINKLING HOURS
NORTH OF MAIN STREET 6 A. M. TO 9 A. M.
SOUTH OF MAIN STREET 6 P. M. T<fc9 P. M.

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|j Grangeville Electric light &
Power Co.
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any.
of
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not
of
get
and
and
QUARTERMASTER GENERAL IS
THE BIGGEST TAILOR AND
COBBLER IN THE WORLD.
dll
ALSO RUNS GREAT LAUNDRY
Collecting Fruit Pits and Nutshells for
Gas Mask Charcoal—United States
Buys Cuban Sugar Crop for Equita
ble Distribution.
to
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(From Committee on Public Informa
tion.)
Washington.—Artlcl»s of wearing
apparel to the number of 1,450,370
were repaired during July In the shops
,of various camps and cantonments of
the United States army. In this total
were 314,518 pairs #f shoes, 48,802
hats, 65,841 overcoats, 07,506 coats,
259,976 pairs of breeches, 84,212 flan
nel shirts, 242,217 un<|ershlrts, 208,538
pairs of drawers, 6,100 pairs of stock
ings, 20,057 pairs of leggings, 53,799
blankets, 764 sweatern and 47,905 oth
er articles. *
Besides being,,the biggest tailor and
cobbler, the quartermaster general la
probably also the operator of the
greatest laundry on earth. During
July there were handled In the laun
dries attached to the various camps
and cantonments 9,702,170 pieces. In
cluding 2,030,947 garments for officers
and enlisted men. The total revenue
from these laundries was $297,179.12.
A
One hundred of tlt(p* 200 stations to
be established for tile assembling of
fruit pits and nut shklls which are to
be converted into charcoal for gas
masks have been designated by the
Red Cross, which Is in charge of the
collections throughout the country.
Encouraging reports of collections
already have been received In Wash
ington. Girl scouts* headquarters an
nounces that at one collection point
two little girls from one troop which
had been In the work for a short time
brought In 1,600 pits, while another
pair contributed 2,000 each.
Wholesale grocers lfi large cities
have sent in copies of posters they
have had printed und circulated among
retailers. Each of tbo latter has been
requested to place a receptacle In his
store for the pits and shells and to co
operate with their local Bed Cross rep
räsentatives.
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The United State^ sugar equaliza
tion bound has contracted with the Cu
ban minister to the United States to
sugar crop at a
»er 100 pounds, f.
Tilts purchase Is
purchase the Cuban
price busis of $5.50
o. b. Cuban ports,
made on behalf of the American, Eng
lish, French and Italian governments.
The crop will begin to be available
,ln December, and Ifs division among
the allies will be directed by the Unit
ed States food administration. These
arrangements will this year, as last,
put an end to all speculation In sugar
and assure an equitable distribution
among all the alllek und to our own
;;
consumers.
Brig. Gen. Charles Richard, acting
surgeon generul while General Gorgas
is In Franee, has cor
"that the nursing heeds of the army
have already been met, and that 27,
000 nurses have been enrolled by the
Red Cross In response to the surgeon
general's request for 25,000 graduate
nurses by January 1, 1919."
General Richard says that 25,000
must be obtained before the
rected a statement
nurses
first of the year. More than 16,000 are
now on the rolls of the army nurse
stlU to be found..
corps, leaving 9,01
General Richard estimates that before
July 1, 1919, 50,000 nurses will be re
quired. Thus lu lesj than a year 34,000
must step forward, General
Richard point? out, to meet the need.
nurses
To meet the growing Interest In the
public health nurse as a factor In
saving the lives of babies and in keep
ing the health of the American popula
tion back of the lli[ies up to standard,
the children's bureau of the United
States department of labor has Just
published a pamphlet on "The Public
Health Nurse; How She Helps to
Keep Our Babies Well." This pam
phlet was prepared by Dr. C. E. A.
Winslow, 4 »iofessof of public health
at Yale university. It hns been sent
to the state child welfare chairman
of the council of national defense for
the Information of communities that
engaged in the children's year
campaign to save 100,060 babies.
The national organization for pub
lic health nurses ms suggested that
the state councils of national defense
shnll engage a supervisor of nurses
who shall keep up the standard of
public health nursing in the state and
espeelally shall kU, in touch with
those nurses who are provided with
onlv the emergency equipment of the
ten-weeks' campaign.

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Fresh milk will he supplied to 26,000
sick and wounded soldiers In France
by 1,000 cows whh'h the French gov
ernment bus agreed to loan to
the American Bed Cross, It Is an
nounced by that organization. With
these cows the Bid Cross will estab
lish a model experimental dairy plant
at the largest American army hos
pital In France. An appropriation of
$5,000 has li'-en made for the institu
tion of the plant. As the dairy will be
operated by convnjlascent soldiers the
cos* of maintenance will be compara
th»lv sineii.
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WE
We
have
like
train
vide
who
$150.00
past
to be little, If
There would seem
any. connection between the problem
of supplying General Persblng with
artillery ammunition and that of fur
sny, with
Actually, however, the
Ain.,
Tusciimbla,
ntslimg
better milk,
relation of one to the other Is so
reu! and intimate that the chief of
<( the United States war de
ordnance
partment hns approved plans whereby
not only Tuscumhla, but also dozens
of other cities and towns where ord
terlal is manufactured, will
get better milk and better living con
It has been found
that where living conditions are bad
and housing provisions Inadequate,
ordnance workers become discontented
and production lags.
Tuscumbia, Sheffield and Florence,
Ala., contain the employees of the
three great government nitrate plants
-locnted in the vicinity of Mussel
Like most small towns sud
men
years
and
KANE
Bldg.,
minci ma
dll Ions generally.
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Shoals.
denly required by the present war to
accommodate huge ordnance enter
prises planted In their midst, these
three communities were wholly unable
to afford proper housing, and« condi
tions rapidly got beyond control. The
better and more desirable of the work
ers, with their families, grew restless.
A transformation Is now In progress
under direction of the community or
$*
4"
;•
b*
gnnization branch. Vice centers have
been eradicated, the sale of liquor
has been placed under rigid control.
A public market has been established
for the three towns. Here fanners
from the surrounding districts take
their products and dispose of them to
representatives of the ordnance
plants. Wagons of the ordnance de
partment then cart the produce to the
plants and sell It at cost to the work
ers.
Central bureaus for these three
towns have undertaken the housing
problem. Parks and playgrounds are
being planned for the workers and
their families. The communities them
selves have been awakened to the
slgntflcant part which such Improve
ments play In the business of making
munitions and of winning the war.
Statistics gathered under direction
of Brig. Gen. B. E. Wood, acting quar
termaster general of the army, show
that the cost of equipping and main
taining a soldier overseas Is $423.47 a
year. To equip and maintain a soldier
In the United States costs $327.78 a
year.
Subsistence, figured at 69 cents a
day, amounts to $251.85 per man over
seas ; figured at 52 cents a day in thé
United States, It amounts to $189.80
per man. The cost of the Initial equip
ment for the soldier the first year in
the United States is $115.30. The cost
of the Initial equipment of the soldier
overseas tor the first year is $42.41.
This cost of $42.41 Is for articles
which are Issued for overseas use only
and which are in addition to the regu
lar equipment. Thus it appears that
If the soldier going overseas did not
take with him a great deal of his
equipment already supplied him in the
United States, the contrast between
the cost of equipping and maintaining
u soldier In this country and abroad
would be much more marked.
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The largest private telephone branch
In the world Is the one that serves the
increasing needs of the war depart
ment In Washington. It fills a special
ty ««instructed three-story building con
taining 44 "positions"—an office bigger
tlmn the "central" in many a consider
able city. Thirty additional "posi
tions" nre In course of installation.
On July 1 this branch served 8,178
extensions ; on August 1, 3,620. It re
quires 126 trunk lines for Incoming
calls; 76 trunk lines for outgoing
calls, local and suburban toll ; 17 pri
vate toll lines to New York, Philadel
phia, Baltimore, Detroit (via Cleve
land), Hoboken and Newport News,
and 105 tie lines to other government
stations In Washington.
An average of four records taken
during July shows 32,938 outward and
10,564 Inward calls In 24 hours. In the
"peak" hours the calls often run a#
high, as 7,284 an h*»ur. The operating
force consists of 90 persons.
re
In
to
A.
for
Establishment of new papers during
the war Is to be prohibited unless the
of necessity for them can he shown, and
and combinations of two or more ngrlcul
tural periodicals must be reported to j
the pulp and paper'section of the war .
the industries board for a ruling as to pa
P*r tonnage that will be allowed.
The United States war industries
hoard has announced that agricultural
periodicals must reduce their con
sumption of print paper 15 per cent
under regulations for the conservation
of print paper adopted by that board.
The regulations were to become effec
tive October 1, 1918.
A committee of publishers recom
mended the use of lighter body paper;
discontinuance of subscriptions In ar
rears ; free exchanges to be cut off
and free copies to advertisers and ad
vertising agencies to be restricted;
abandonment of sales at nominal or
exceedingly low price, of prize con
tests for subscriptions and special or
holiday numbers except such as have
been regularly Issued In the past.
The bureau of unitnal Industry of
the United States department of agri
culture has Just Issued a list of all
the dairy herds in the United States
that on July 1. 1918, had been offi
cially accredited as free front tubercu
losis or that* had successfully passed
one test with n view to certification.
Copies of the list are furnished to
state and municipal officials and pri
vate persons.
Certificates of freedom from tubercu
losis are soon to he issued by the bu
reau'of animal Industry to all owaera
of accredited herds.
gov
to
an
hos
of
be
the
WE WANT REPRESENTATIVES
LN EVERY TOWN IN IDAHO
We prefer men who have sold stock.
Insurance, real estate, books or who
have had no sales experience but would
like to develope into salesmen. We
train every applicant accepted and pro
vide a system that will enable anyone
who works to make from $75.00 to
$150.00 per week.
of exceptional ability. Position
permanent. In applying state age,
past business experience, number of
have lived in community.
Can also use wo
men
years you
and references. Address In confidence.
KANE MFG. CO., 1026-27 L. C. Smith
Bldg., Seattle, Wash.*
4S-3t
Lands. Geo. M. Reed.
*<>
CIDER
J;; SPARKLING
SPITZENBERGER
$*
Absolutely Pure Apple Juice
By the Bottle
RAINER BEER ON DRAUGHT.
4"
ICE FOR SALE
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MAT'S PLACE, Distributor
M. B. GEARY, P%p- £ ,
b* »
+*
CITY MEAT MARKET
JOHN CALLAN, Proprietor
FRESH AND CURED MEATS, FISH, POULTRY
SEE US BEFORE SELLING YOUR HIDES
The best of everything in our line constantly on hand.
Garbfer Building,'Main Street.
Pacific Phone 141
Announcement
The Interior Warehouse Co., has reopened
their warehouse and will*be in a position to
grain and hay for storage. A share
of your potronage is solicited.
WE WILL BUY BARLEY AND OATS
and will receive for consignment wheat in
any warehouse or elevator on the Prairie.
WHEAT AND OAT
BAGS FOR
SALE.
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receive
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For further information see local agent.
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GEO. S. DOWNER
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Inland Abstract & Trust Co., Ltd
R. F. FULTON, Manager
ABSTRACTS OF TITLE REAL ESTATE LOANS
CONVEYANCING
ORANGEVILLE, IDAHO
Physicians and Surgeons
DR. G. S. STOCKTON
Physician and Surgeon
Scales Block, Orangeville, Idaho.
DR. P. J. SÜALL0N
Physician and Surgeon
Office in G. 8. A T. Co. block.
Osteopath
DR. JOHN SIMONS
. Osteopathic Physician
Graduate of American School of Osteo
pathy, Kirks ville, Mo. Suite 104-106
Wilks Block, Orangeville. Treat all
Office
j
Acute and Chronic diseases,
hours: 9 to 12 a. m. 2 to 5 p.
otherwise by appointment.
m.
Dentists
DR. D. J. POWELL
Dentist
Allen Block, Grangeville, Idaho.
Attorneys
A. S. HARDY
Attorney-at-Law
I'rai-tlces In all
I he Courts.
out Fiist National Bunk.
Offices
M. REESE HATTABAUGH
Atforney-at-Law
v 'HI practice hi all Courts of Idaho.
Otlii-e in Si-ales Block.
E. M. GRIFFITH
Attorney-at-Law
Bract lee extends to all courts of Idaho
• tvl Washington.
Gtfii'p over First
Nui louai Bank. Grangeville, Idaho
FOR SALE.
Having sold my farm I am offering
for sale all my personal property to*
wit : 1 brood sow due to farrow this
month, 3 gilts, 4 work horses, 10 cows,
6 heifers, 3 of them are registered and
papers go with them and 3 calves.
About 40 ton of hay, all in the barn ex
cept 5 ton, 1 disc, 1 drag harrow, mower
and rake and other small tools used on
the farm. Call early and avoid the
rush. C. H. GOAN.
FORD FOR SALE.
Have Ford car In good state of repair
for sale cheap. Call at the Central
Garage and look It over. You know it
is imposible to purchase a new Ford
at this time.
41-tf.
Secret Orders
w. o. w.
Grangeville Camp No. 2W
Meets First and Third Monday» a*
eacli month at I. O. O. F. balL
GEORGE L. SLY, C. C.
U. H. AMBLER, Clerk
I. 0. 0. F.
Mt. Idaho Lodge No. 7
Meets every Saturday night at 7 *
o'clock. Visiting Odd Follows alwa/>
Pacific phone 1011.
welcome.
NEl'Hl ALDRICH, N. G.
J. N. OLIVER, Ree.
I. 0. 0. F.
Camas Prairie Encampment
No. 18
Meets Second and Fourth Saturday* *
» 'itch month at I. O. O. F. bail.
E. S. HANCOCK, C. P.
JESSE L. RAINS, Roc. Serif*
WOMEN 0 F _ wb 0 DCRAFl
Idaho Circle No.
Meets at I. O. O. F. tall the Seem
and Fourth Mondays of en -li mooi
M INN IE STEPHENS, G. N.
LENA MARKHAM. Clef*
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS
Buffalo Hump Lodge No
Meets each Tuesday at I-odge B<- r *
Meets each Monday at Isxlge Ro*/»
In Schmnileku Block.
E O. ABRAMSON. C. C.
H AUGER. K. of R »nd
F. 0. E.
Grangeville Aerie No. 5^
VI» *
Meets every Friday at 8 P nl
ing Brothers are always wclinin**.
E. S. HANTiH K, \V P
FRANK VAN DE« INTER- •

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