OCR Interpretation


The Grangeville globe. [volume] (Grangeville, Idaho) 1907-1922, November 14, 1918, Image 3

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091099/1918-11-14/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

W ANTED— M«*n with teams
tors to plow stubble luuil.
phone Edwin Nelson.
or trac- j
See or tele
47-tf I
C. GOAN
THE TREE MAN
Don t Wait Until Goan is Gone and then Say
as This Man Did
I WISH I HAD PATRONIZED OUR LOCAL MAN.
and dealt with responsible people, but sit right down and
make out a list of the trees that
spring, don't wait, act
you want this fall or next
And as a reward for being
prompt 1 w ill give you tree with every cash order amount
ing to $5.00 ONE YEARS SUBSCRIPTION TO THE
RURAL AMERICAN. And for every cash order of $10
and over, THREE YEARS SUBSCRIPTION TO THE
RURAL AMERICAN, OR ONE YEAR TO CRANGE
VILLE GLOBE. Each Issue of the Rural American con
tains a summary of the week's war news, foreign and
cui rent news ol interest to every member of every family
anywhere in the United States, human interest editorials,
pattern and fashion page, suffrage articles, jokes, ques
tion and answer columns, etc.
the year around are alone worth the price of the paper,
to say nothing ol the colored comics and other interest
ing features. Over the top of all this you got free 10 ex
cellent postal cards, very appropriate to send to your boy
' ' over there. ' '
now.
j
;
!
I
The serial stories that run
So get busy with your pencil and paper and turn the
corners of your mouth up, not down, and make out your
list, but be sure to smile and t lit* world smiles with you,
kick and you kick alone for the cheerful grin will let you
in where the kicker is never known,
are thirty-five cents and up, according to the
variety.
Price of the trees
age and
I
;
j
j
;
;
■r • '•
■id
-A..
A I
*
j
i
I
|
!
j
j
' *•
N
Se
1
1:
Orttftnd Swift Plant
öarn*aot*Ma».;äU
'm
inU.S.A.
iwift Sc Cotojwry
)Ue ci Our 22 Packikij
Unt
Unlike Topsy
Swift & Company
Has Not "Jest Growed
11
Swift & Company, in fifty years of well
ordered growth, has become or >2 of the
great national services because it has
learned to do something for the American
people which they needed to have done
for them,. in the way in which they
preferred to have it done.
It has met each successive demand, in
the changing conditions of national life,
by getting good meat to increasing mil
lions effectively, efficiently, economically,
and expeditiously.
The Swift & Company packing plants,
refrigerator cars, car routes, branch
houses, organization, and personnel of
today are the practical solutions, bom of
practical experience, to the food problems
of half a century.
Because of all these elements working in
correlation and unison, Swift & Company
is able to supply more and better meat to
more people than would have been pos
sible otherwise, at a net profit per pound of
meat so low (a fraction of a cent) that the
consumer price is practically unaffected.
Strip away any portion of this vast,
smooth-running human machine, and you
make a large part of the meat supply
uncertain, lose the benefit ofhalf a century
of fruitful experience, and scatter the
intelligent energies of men who have
devoted a life work toward meeting the
needs of a nation in one vital field.
The booklet of preceding chapters in this story of
the packing indust ry will be mailed on request to
Swift & Company,
Union Stock Yards, Chicago, Illinois.
Swift & Company, U. S. A.
&
£
■<
j
I
At the Smoke House you will And
on sale Columbia grafanola* and all
the latest records.
j
J
I
ers
j
!
MANY STATIONS ESTABLISHED
j
-I
I OF FRANGE
1ST
INTERESTING FACTS CONCERN-;
ING ITS ACTIVITIES, TOLD BY
FRANKLIN ROOSEVELT.
Million and a Quarter Tons of Coal
Saved by Daylight Saving Law—Na
tional Movement Started for Re
claiming Waste Materials.
In
to
(From Committee
Informa
Washington.—FruinvUu Li. lloosevelt,
assistant secretary of the navy, In a
statement since his return from a tour
of American naval bases and stations
In Europe, described the work of the
j United States navy In the waters sur
rounding England, France, Italy,
Greece and the Azores.
"Our operations on the British const
are fairly well known, hut it probably
is not generally realized that on the
continent we have a large personnel
on shore and have more stations in |
; Franco than we have in all England,"
Secretary Roosevelt said.
"On the west coast of France we
have a series of bases for the repair
and upkeep of our escorting ships, de
stroyers, submarine chasers, etc.
! have been using French facilities so
I far as possible, but iu most cases we
have had to erect complete plants so
that these facilities are now more than
double what they were before we went
there.
We
"All the way from the Spanish bor
der to the English channel we have
established aviation stations so spaced
that the entire coast line is covered by
Nearly all
seaplanes' and dirigibles,
these stations are situated at out-of
the-way points, some on uninhabited
I islands, others in fishing vessels on
; peninsulas. Lahor was almost impos
j sibl'e to obtain, so these stations were
j built almost entirely by our own sail
; ors. At each station there are from
; 200 to 300 men. This aviation force
j and our patrol vessels have been doing
i such splendid work that for the past
I six mouths there have been praetical
| l.v no sinkings within 50 miles of the
! French coast.
"At one point we have an immense
j assembly and repair base which em
j ploys more than 5,000 men. An in
stance of the way In which every bit
of material has been utilized is found
in connection with this base where,
before the erection of the permanent
quarters, the men took packing cases
In which planes were shipped, and used
them In building barracks which were
, ...
very comfortable.
' .. ,,
In northern France, in co-operation
with the British,,the United States es
tablished wlmt is known as the North
enï Bombing Group. This was ,„-igi
nailv organized to bomb the German !
submarine bases ,,n the Belgian mast.
After the British had blockaded the
entrance to those harbors. Germans
were prevented from clearing the chan
nel by tin.. activity of these
. . . .. ï,.,, ï
aviators who daily and nightly dropped
„ , . .
tons of explosives on the submarine
k tv< j
I
;
We have a considerable naval force
at Gibraltar. In conjunction with the
British this force not only patrols the |
Atlantic in that vicinity, but also is ac
tive in the Mediterranean escorting
vessels to and from Italy, Greece and
Egypt. In the Adriatic we have es- j
; tahlished a large group of submarine j
j chasers and other vessels at work, i
| In conjunction with the Portuguese we j
1 have established a base in the Azores." j
There appeared to be a tnisappre- ;
| hension in this country as well ns in
j France. Assistant Secretary Itoose- j
; velt said, as to the part taken by the
I American navy in transporting troops
; nnd supplies to French ports. Every
; transport that tiles the United States
1 flag is officered, manned and run by
! tin- American navy, be said. Much the
! larger portion of supplies for the army
In France is taken across in American !
vessels officered and manned by the I
United States navy.
I
Nine enlisted men of the navy who
i „ j . , ,,
volunteered to be inoculated with the
... , . . „ . , ,
serum of Spanish influenza to help
,. . ... .. ... . ,
medical officers gather specific facts re
,, . ,, ..
garding the disease and discover the
means of combating it. have been com
, , . ,, , « . • ï T,
mended l»y Secretary Daniels. The
experiment was conducted during the
prevalence of the epidemic In the first
naval district, Boston, nnd the volun
teers understood the danger to which
None of the
They were Isolated for ten days
they exposed themselves for the benefit
of others.
The test indicated that the disease
is not due to a filtrated virus, as the
results were negative,
men Inoculated contracted the dis
ease.
after their inoculation.
As n measure against the further
spread of influenza, war workers In
Washington, D. <'.. are taken to their
duty every morning by automobile In
stead of in crowded street cars. The
division of transportation of the gov
ernmental emergency commission work
ed out the plan which, it is estimated,
pmvldes for the accommodation of 25,
000 of these workers every day in pri
vately owned automobiles that volun
teer to "give a lift" to the men and
w< men— especially the latter,
da» ger of traveling in crowded street
cars is thus removed for them.
The
iontrurts for motortrucks, chassis,
ambulances, tractors, passenger cars,
motorcycles and bicycles aggregating
about siiin.noo.oon, have been placed
j With various manufacturers by the mo
J tor- and vehicles division of the motor
I transport corps. The orders cover 38,
trucks and chassis of different 1
Bizi-- and types, and 3,084 ten-ton trail
ers and l.'io four-wheel trailers. Or
ders for 100 four-wheel drives have j
j been placed. Other orders Include 18,000
passenger ears; 300 winter cars, 558
limousines, H.inki delivery cars, 18,775
! motorcycles, and 25,000 bicvcles.
There have been purchased for the
j Use of the army In October and No- j
vemlier 47.000.000 pounds (230.700 bar
rels) of Hour, 17.IKK),000 pounds of
which N for domestic needs. The re
mainder is for the troops In France.
The purchases were made by the sub
sistence division of the quartermaster j
corps.
1ST
More than 4,(XX),000 gallons of sirup
have been bought for the troops over
seas for use with their "hot cakes" as
well as for s\^*elenlng their pastry.
In addition to these supplies the sub
sistence division has bought more than
lon.iioo.ooo cans of salmon—enough for
tin army's requirements for a year.
About 80 per cent of this lot will go ■
to the forces in France. It is esti
mated that 10 ounces of salmon are 1
a
equivalent to 20 ounces of beef,
in | trench warfare.
we
de
so
we
so
Con
centration of the product makes It par
ticularly desirable in both mobile and
Consumption of coal was reduced
by a million and a quarter tons during
the seven months' operation of the
"daylight saving" law, according to fig
ures complied by (he United States
fuel administration. When the clocks
were set ahead arl hour, beginning Sun
day. March 31, and ending October 27,
the fuel administration planned to gath
er facts from many sources In various
sections of the couniVy to determine 1
the saving In fuel likely to result from |
the operation of the law. These data
have been compiled and form the basis
of the estimate of the amount of coal
saved.
In one district from which definite
facts were obtained It was shown that
I
\
I
We
by
all
on
the saving <>f coal was 17% tons per
1,000 of population for the period of
seven months. These figures were
checked against records obtained from
other places In different sections hav
ing the same relative conditions, and
from the Information thus collated the
estimate of 1.250,000 tons saved is
past
the
em
in
bit
used
were ,,,,,,
ery community, including towns with
- " ... , .
. 1,000 population und
,
triets, as well ns large metropolitan
reached. The fuel administration says
that the "daylight saving" plan In Eu
ropean countries has been effectual
chiefly in the seven longer months.
A national system for (he collection
and disposal of materials which It is
most desired to reclaim at this time,
sricli as paper, eotton and woolen rugs,
steel, copper, hruss, zinc, rubber, tin,
leather, lead, tin foil, etc., has been
organized and a working plan for ev
outlying dis
es
, .
, rh,s s * vst " In W>1 bp »'Initnlstered by
! tb " war ," rlso, j ll,b,,r and natlonal
•'('Wamatlon section of the war
the ,adu l s,rles 14 ,s ex P PCtoU that
<hl !' ,ren l ,H >' er antl raRS
chan- ,lnd « v ? rjr i,,l,llv > n 1,1 ,he n ' ove,,M ' ut
these ''j" 1 '"'T •lndr « reclamation coun
ï cil when It begins the work. With the
......
organization of the local councils,
... , '
j through the war prison'and national
waste reclamation section, collection
I and disposal will be arranged for every
household. apartment. department
slnre. office building and city* stute
; and federal Institution.
-
(•»■liters, lias been formulated.
force
the
the |
ac
and
es- j
j among
work, i made by the United States food admin
we j Istrntlon on December 1. Instead of Oc
j tober 27, ns was originally planned.
; The spread of influenza and the con
in sequent ban on nil manner of public
j gatherings and activities, including pu
the trintic work, prompted the postpone
troops ment of tlie campaign.
Every
Distribution of 20,000,000 food cards
American lmusewlves will be
The new card will contain no regu
lations regarding either "wheatless" or
"meatless" days, but will urge as a
whole the careful saving of all edibles,
States
by
the
army particularly wheat, meat, fats and su
! gar. It will be necessary for the Unit
the I ed States to send 5.750.(XKi tons more of
I foodstuffs to the allies this year than
! last, witli an almost «taggering total
coming
17,5(K).(XK) tons In the
of
who , , ,
,, yenr. In order that 120.(KH),(X)0 people
the I . . ,,, ,
, of these allied nations sitting at a
help „
common table with AixMicn may
re- , , ,
.. have stamina to bring the war to a
the , ,
conclusion if peace Is not meantime
com- i , , , , '
T, I obtained by Germany s surrender,
The
the ]
first I
volun- j during tin* past season lias saved $2.
which 7(X).(Xl(l worth of crops al a cost of
$82.800 according to a report Issued
by the department of agriculture. The
of ridding the farms
pests was carried on ill 25 counties.
the Two hundred and seventy-six tons of
poisoned oats were used.
days numbers of ground squirrels, prairie
dogs, rats and mice were destroyed.
Destruction of rodents In Montana
benefit
disease
the
dis
if thes**
Immense
further
In
their
In
The
gov
work
25,
pri
volun
and
street
Nearly 4(X),(XXI.(XX) feet of yellow pine
lumber have been o"t and transported
by rail and water to shipyards on the
Atlantic coast and the Gulf coa^g for
tlie construction of ..^oden vessels un
der tlu* direction of the United States
Shipping Board Emergency Fleet cor
poration. With tills amount of lumber.
It Is pointed out by tin* way of illustrât
Ing its immensity, the Atlantic ocean
could tie spanned from the American to
the French shore—3.000 miles or more
The
—with a bridge floor '2."> f»»ot wide und
inch thick, with about 4,00b.000 f»'et
spare.
to
/"Ti
S »5 -
/*^^_ ^
VB 4
1 P
j
j
TAR AND GRAVEL APPARATUS
j
a
1
£
Device Invented by New Jersey Man
ufacturer for Heating Materials
for Pavements.
Emulating the famous hunter of the
olden days who kilted two birds with
one stone, a New Jersey manufacturer
has recently brought out a combina
tion tar and gravel henter that heats
these two dissimilar materials quite In
dependently but with one operation.
The device, which Is shown in the ac
companying Illustration, Is particularly
fitted for slreet paving where block
go ■
1 Pavements with tar joints are laid.
The apparatus consists of two main
parts, a rectangular tar kettle and a
Y-shaped gravel bln, with n furnace
extending beneath both parts, from
one end to the other. The furnace Is
tired from the gravel end of the de
fig
27,
1 kettle
|
that
I vice. The smoke and gases escape
\ through an ordinary stove pipe In the
I kettle end. The inside of the gruvel
ft
— GRAVtL BIN
TAB.
|RK>MITtD
%rts FOR
nmlKABf
■ fi
MtATtD '
TAR OUT
HOT GASES UNDER
TAR KfcTTUL, AND
UP OUT OF STACK
Ï \
PUS NACI
per Combination Tar and Gravel Heating
Device in Operation.
of
hav
and
the
is
henter Is triangular shaped while the
outside is made up in steps consisting
of perforated metal plates. The Y
shaped top nets as a reservoir bin and
the gravel feeds down the steps and
out at the bottom. The perforations
in the step plates allow the moisture
In (he gravel to escape readily as it Is
turned into steam by the heat of the
fire, thereby making it possible to heat
both tar and gravel.—Popular Science
says
Eu
Monthly,
Monthly,
I
BENEFIT OF SHADE TREES
In Wisconsin Owner Is Given Annual
Bounty of Three Cents for Each
Rod of Highway.
The Wisconsin law provides that
financial consideration may he given
by the state to people who plant and
cultivate trees by the roadside. Ev
ery person along or through whose
lands a highway passes may plant and
cultivate on one or both sides of the
road where he shall own land, trees
of such varieties as commonly grow at
least 40 feet high. These must be
set two rods or less apart nnd in a
row within eight feet of the outer line
of the highway.
When such trees reach 12 feet In
'
h( ,,„ ht tlu , superintendent of highways
sha „ Rive the mvm , r upon r( ,quest a
certificate accepting the trees as pub
He shade trees. Thereafter they be-
long to the public and are protected as
Public property, but the title to them
1,1 1° the fruit they bear belongs to
tlie owner ns long as-be maintains
the trees and replaces such as die.
The owner shall receive an annual
bounty of three cents for each rod of
highway along which such trees
are
planted on one side nnd six cents If
planted on both sides, to be credited
on bis highway taxes.
a
BENEFIT OF IMPROVED ROADS
From Standpoint of Almighty Dollar
It Pav« Handsome Yearly Divl
dend to Farmer.
Let everybody awaken to the Im
portance of Improving the public road,
f° r improved roads will bring:
a a nee.
a attention,
of
of
Better schools nnd greater attend
Better health and quicker medical
Better farms and more cultivated
land.
Better crops and better transporta
tion.
Bettor social conditions and less iso
lation.
Better churches and better homes.
Better men and a better nation.
Improved roads have n money value
ns well as a social value.
Looking at an Improved road from
the standpoint of the almighty dol
lar. it is found to pay a handsome
dividend each year.
Maintenance of Gravel Roads.
On many trunk highways, n gravel
surface would tie entirely unsatisfac
tory, but we must not overlook tlie
fact that on roads carrying compara
tively light trnffic the annuaI interest
cost of a more substantial pavement
may exceed the maintenance cost of
for
un
gravel.
to
Durable Roads.
Time-saving, durable ronds are now
ns Important ns quick-firing guns, and
it Is higli time to speed up construc
tion in order to quicken food delivery,
1
to
-
-■A
tt
M
/
m
4- :
COL. j. E. KNIGHT
Are Yon Going to
STAY
Wiiere You Arc?
That's Your Business!
Are You Going to Take
A trip—That's the Rail
. road's Business!
Are yoi going to have a
Public Sale? That's every
body's business.
Do You Need a First-Class
AUCTIONEER?
That's My Business!
1
COL. J. E. KNIGHT
Gra.ngevi.lle, Idaho
All dates arranged at this
office
Hides, Pelts,
Furs, Junk
M. J. HOWARD
j
Y
Is
OFFICE AT PRICE'S BARN.
»•M-++»+-H-++++4++-fr M ♦♦♦♦» » •
X
HANCOCK
UNDERTAKING
0MPANY
< •
■■
< ■
Well appointed Home
Funeral Parlors
Next to Postoffice
Grangeville,
< ■
<•
X
• •
<>
i J |
Ev- <•
*
the
at
be
a
line
In
a
be-
as
Idaho
Christian Science
Services
SUNDAY AT 11 O'CLOCK
Sunday School at 10 o'doek
Wednesday evening testimonial
meeting at 7 :30 o'clock. K. of P.
hall
to
die.
of
in Sehinudeka building.
All are welcome.
are
If
Geo.'s Livery
Livery Feed
Best Rigt; in the City
Excellent Saddle Horses
Board by Day or Week
Give us a Call
Im
Geo. D. Smith,
Prop.
Dr. Koch^ Remedies
iso
dol
S. M. SWINEHART
Agent
Stites, Idaho
I now |iave a complete stock of
goods and nil mail orders will be
given prompt
attention.
tlie
of
WHAT TO USE TO
PREVENT APPENDICITIS
< ■ rangevllle
simple biicktli.ini I,ark, glycerine, etc.,
as mixed in Adler-i-ka, flushes tlie KN
•TUK bewel tract so completely that
appendicitis u prevented.
Sl't ION I II. A.||;*r-i-Ka relieves
lieople should know
ONE
ANY
CASE sour c.touiuch, gas or constipa
tion because it removes A LI# foul ma»
ter which ( lugged and (Kiisoned your
system. The INSTANT aetion sur
prises both doctors and patients. G!un
« I »rug ( '«>.
now
and
vili

xml | txt