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The Grangeville globe. [volume] (Grangeville, Idaho) 1907-1922, January 02, 1919, Image 3

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091099/1919-01-02/ed-1/seq-3/

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FRENCH TANKS JUMP INTO ACTION
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This is a scene from one of the phases of the big July offensive
of the allies, taken while bullets zipped al>out the
rapher and the stretcher-bearer lying in the foreground.
Somewhere in the rolling country of the Somme-Aisne front
two light French tanks in the picture are husrying forward,
ears of the photog
the
prob
ably having as a special goal a machine gun nest which has been
harrying the advancing French. British or Americnn infantry,
light tanks have been one of the greatest factors in forcing the Ger
mans back, and at the same time have held the allied
to a comparatively low figure. ~ - **
I
The
casualties
1
LETTER FROM MAC GREGG.
American E. F., France,
Dear Parents. —
Just a line or so to let -you know that |.
I a in getting along nicely and am in
the best of health.
I have changed locations since I last
wrote you, and am very well pleased
with present surroundings. Am get
ting good fi hmI and have good quarters
and plenty of exercise, no there's no
cause to complain, whatever.
All of tlio old bunch were in good
health when 1 last saw them.
I had quite a pleasant trip recently.
I saw some fine country and passod
through some big cities, one of them j
being Paris. We saw a good slum !
there end had a look at a couple of
museums. It is a wonderful city even j
now, although the war has caused it j
to lose some of its brilliancy, which it
will no doubt regal \ liefere long.
I am starting in on some very im
portant werk, but I won't tell yon until
;
!
***
*
••*
1;.
♦ »M* *K"> *1* *3* *> *3» *3» *3* *3* *3» *3» *3* *3* *3» ❖ «3* *3* «3* *3* *3* *3* *3» *3« *3* *3* *3« *3* *3* *3» * *3* *3* *3* *3* «3» *3* *3
•►3*-3* *3* *3*
*
KAMIAH GRANITE & MARBLE WORKS
+
v
Manufacturer and Dealer in
MONUMENTAL AND CEMETERY WORK.
s
X



«
Kamiah Granite
Also importer of all
foreign granites
anti marbles.
Best of machinery
fur polishing
cutting ami
engraving.
•:*
t
%
Prompt delivery to any part of the country
Kamiah, Idaho.

t
Karl C. Frank, Prop.
• *3* *3* *3« *5* *3* *3* *3* *3* *J* *5* *$* *j* *j* •*« »j* *j* *** •*« **« •*« *j* »j« «j» *j« *j* »j« »*« **•
!i!
in
BEFORE YOU
BUY a FARM
LOOK INTO THESE OPPORTUNITIES
1 'J miles from (inmtreviHo, we
Reasonable Terms.
improved, prit
160 acres, it
$5,000.
ill,* 240 acres under cultivu
280 acres. 4 mil* s from (irangev:
tion; well improved.
Attractive terms.
;;ot) acres initier cultivation, with
lirnk' ii <>ut.
Vet tl
it*
SOUK* sot
440 acres
crins.
SO acres umler plow.
soil, well improve-!;
520 acres, line l rei
Terms.
low : line five soil; well improved. Terms.
603 acn s. 2 "
iiuler 1
il, well watered
anclics in the
Fine free
su
240 acres, 145 aert - under p
w.
with springs. ( hie ot tin* hot ho
iSOOO if taken within thirty days.
and corn
tJeason
1 'nee 7
country,
able terms.
FURTHER PARTICULARS SEE OR WRITE
FOR
GRANGEVILLE SAVINGS & TRUST CO.
Grangeville, Idaho
•Till
il,.,. , , .... , ,
I nn\t* ;in .issun I iiisv-s, K js muni:
mini re hard v rk an 1 long horn s
of study, hut 1 ha venI a duiiht but
sLall succeed for I intend to
appl.v mys'-lf us I really sin aid in n<-
enrd with the reward that i- the oh
jeet I have in view.
vas glad P hear that you were
getting al- ng s
tiling to do is to keep it u|(—"k
your morals at loo ... ns they
say in the army.
Tins scrap c:
1 when it's over I'll
to
|.
j .
!
j
j
beans,
Idaho.
; vii.it I
well, and
the main
'I*
:*n't last forever and
show you wlmt a
"dutiful son" is really like.
Well, dear parents. 1 must close for
the present. 1 lioiie this finds you well
and happy.
1st SGT. W. M GRF.GG.
Co. I, 1*1 (it 1 1 Engineers
! FOR SALE—Field seed peas, Ban
galia ; also about 3000 pounds navy
1'. E. SHERWIN, Orangeville.
48-tf
*3« *3* *3* *3« *3* *3* *3» * *3* *3* *3* *3* «3» *3* *3
•►3*-3* *3* *3*
RIGHT SYSTEM OF HIGHWAYS
It Should Include Everything From
Expensive Concrete to Minor
Dirt Wsgon Ways«
What we need and In time will have
1* a system of highways which will
ramify from the largest cities to the
doorway of the humblest citizen—vil
lager or farmer. Such a system of
highways will Include trunk lines with
expensive concrete or brick surfaces
for the very heavy traffic, Including
truck-- and automobiles. Less used but
important roads nmy be of wnterbound
macadam or gravel, l'erhnps !n cer
tain regions where stone and gravel
Bre not at hand oiled roads may prove
most economical and practical. Minor
wagon ways must remain of native
soil, built and maintained with the
road drag. Meanwhile antagonism to
road dragging breeds in a lack of In
formation or a narrown - which falls
to comprehend the fa
King.
of
In
D. Ward
Duluth Sets Good Example.
The city of Duluth has erected a
schonlhouse and extensive playground
on land donated by the housing com
pany. The Gary system of education
is applied in this school, which is
equipped with auditorium, gymnasium,
library, workshops and laboratories.
I.and has been set aside for a Prot
estant and a Catholic church. Approx
' imntclv eight acres have been assigned
to use for clubhouse ami recreation
grounds. The clubhouse and grounds
are leased by the housing company to
the Morgan Park club, which Is com
posed of employees. A separate club
building, or neighborhood house, is pro
vided for people who live in low-rental
houses. Aside from the opportunities
for outdoor sport offered In connec
. 1
s tlon with school and clubhouse grounds
are baseball and football grounds, ten
to nls courts, a skating rink and equip
ment for boating, bathing and eamp
ing. \ modern hospital Is another
feature.
Natural Charms Best.
'I*
That garden is best and most
pleasing, If it he a large one, thut
had the most varied charms before
a the hand of man began to interfere
with nature and work at variance with
its dictates.
His Position.
"What's your part in these big
drives? Are you one of the drivers?"
"Oh* no," answered (tie German pri
vate soldier; "I am one of the people
who are being driven."
Have Not the Right Touch.
Many gardens are so out of touch
*** with art and nature that no one feels
* at home in them and the owners
••* throughout live in constant wonder as
1;. to what is wrong.
When It Grew.
X "Our children and the neighbors'
children had a quarrel yesterday."
!£ "Did it amount to much?"
❖ "Not until we parents butted into
% it.'
The Maryland Casualty Company
❖ will Insure your employees under tin*
t Idaho Coiii]x*nsation Act. See Horv
•j-i r
Ilolhwell.
IMPROVED TOOLS
SAVE MilCH TIME
the
of
but
cer
the
to
In
Modern Methods and Implements
Mean More Work Accom
plished at Less Cost.
LABOR SAVED IN HAYMAKING

Scarcity of Man Power Necessitates
General Use of Certain Types of
Labor-Saving Machinery
Horse Solves Problem.
Not
(Prepared bv the United Ftntes Depart
ment of Agriculture.)
Thousands of young men have been
called in the colors, and on ninny farms
this results In a scarcity of labor. The
problem of the hay grower Is how to
handle Ills crop with a smaller crew
than hitherto, and one often mostly
of middle-aged men and boys. With
methods used heretofore this type of (
labor certainly cannot harvest the hay
In the usual time, at least ou many
farms In the East and South, where It
lias been the custom to use a compara
tively large amount of hand labor In
making hay.
and
A
Although there is a scarcity of man
labor, there are still plenty of horses to
on most fnrms, and herein lies the so- w
a
com
is
Prot
to
com
club
pro
ten
equip
eamp
Solution of Problem.
I Is
.5
:
m
.ßjm
In
most
thut
fi;
4.
with
À
X.
{Ai
big
pri
people
>
Iff
touch
feels
as
W
•X
lution of the problem. On farms where
considerable liny Is grown methods
must be adopted by which the greater
part of the heavy labor is done by
horses. This will necessitate the gen- is
eral use of certain types of labor-sav
ing machinery, some of them not so
common in the East, which have been
thoroughly tested and proved sntisfne
tory In the western part of the United
States. The small hay grower, how
ever, need not make a very heavy In
vestment In'ncw baying apparatus, for
by re-arranging the work of his crew
and using a little more horse labor for
the hard work, lie can add eonslder
This Method Saves Much Hard Work
in Hay Making.
into
tin*
Horv
•j-i r
|||U
nldy to the efficiency of his crexv.
The time of day when the mower Is
started has a direct bearing on the
amount of hay made per day and the
number of men required. This is es
pecially true on farms where it is the
custom to haul or stack hay In the af
ternoon only. If mowing Is done In
the morning and raking In the after
noon. more men and horses than usual
will be required, and if mowing and
raking are both done in the afternoon,
still more men and horses will be
needed.
Use Larger Mowers.
The 5-foot cut is the most common
size used in the East. With the pres
ent scarcity of labor, it will he econ
omy to use larger mowers; fi, 7, and
even 8-foot sizes can be used on a
great many farms. Some idea of the
time saved by using these larger sizes
may he had when the difference in the
amount of work done hy each Is known.
Under average conditions, a 5-foot
mower will cut ten acres in ten hours,
a fi-foot mower will cut. 1- acres, a 7
foot 14 acres, and an 8-foot about 10
'acres in ten hours. It should he borne
in mind that more power is required
for the wider cuts. Many alfalfa grow
ers art* using the 8-foot cut with good
sttcccss, and make a practice of mow
ing early in the morning before the
dew is off, or even during a light rain.
It does not pay to wait until the dew
Is off. before starting the mower, if
the tedder is used to "kick" the water
out of tilt* lmy. The size of mower
used and the time of day it is started
are the most important factors in crew
arrangement. The use of the tedder
and rake an* next in importance, and
these three Implements should be kept
clearly In mind when attempting to
solve the problem of how to make a
small crew efficient.
Good Feed for Chicks.
A johnnycake makes good feed for
chicks when crumbled up fine. After
the first week you can begin feeding
small grains such as millet, pinhead
oatmeal, rolled oats, cracked wheat and
cracked corn.
Thin Cream With Water.
If the cream is too thick It should
he thinned out before the churn starts,
but In all cases the thinning should be
i done with water.
•F
WOODLOi PROVIDES WINDBREAK AND SUPPLY
OF FIREWOOD, FENCE POSTS AND LUMBER
N
.
î
V .-&
*• t
m<
<4gl
*
• > *2* ,
4
,r5
Nm&BS
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v :i
Not Only Is a Well-Managed Farm Timber Stand a Source of Fuel, but It
Shelters the Farmstead From the Prevailing Winter Winds.
(
tion
give
is
Not
of
(Prepared by the United States Depart
-at of Agriculture.)
Trees and shrubs about the home
and farmstead not only increase the
valut* of the property but make con
ditions pleasanter and more healthful
A limited amount of planting may be
lone, therefore, for comfort alone Ir
respective of other return. Where a
considerable plantation Is contem
plated. however, it Is essential to
know wlmt material may be grown
economically and the uses to which it
may be put.
On the average farm tn the plains
region the first effort In planting Is
to provide a small grove plantation
w hich will protect .the buildings from
severe winds and furnish shmle for
greater comfort of both man and ani
mals. Sometimes when such a wind
break lias been established the owner
tries to make it furnish a supply of
material for use on the fnrm. This
Is a mistake, for if n belt of trees Is
planted primarily ns a protection
against the wind the pruning and re
moval cf much large material may
lessen or even destroy Its protective
value.
Value of Plantation.
The value of a plantation, other
than a vvlndhreak, on the farm lies
In Its ability to furnish fuel, posts
and n limited amount of lumber and
Within a very few
repair iimterlul.
years after planting the plantation
will need to be pruned and the prun
ing will furnish considerable fuel, de
pending upon the size of the plot, If
good care is given the trees they will
develop rapidly and some thinning
will have to be done to prevent harm
ful crowding. The material thus re
moved will contribute materially to
the upkeep of the farm by furnishing
posts and stakes. When the planta
tion is still older more valuable ina
terial may be harvested. Small tim
bers for building construction, poles
for implements, also tool handles,
neckyokes, eveners, whiffletrees and, In
favorable situations, n limited amount
of lumber is provided at home as
needed,
is a marked scarcity of timber which
will produce even a fair grade of turn
her and tills fact should be Liken
Into account when species are seleet
eu for planting. When a large planta- |
Throughout the plains region there
I
j
CABBAGE WORM MOST
DESTRUCTIVE ENEMY
i

. .
SpPâying IS ElTGCtlVG RGfTlGuy IFl
Combating This Pest.
Community Action Is Desirable Wher
ever Related Crops Are Grown
Extensively—Leave Few Pois
oned Stalks for Traps.
(From the United States Department of
Agriculture.)
The common cabbage worm, the most
destructive enemy of cabbage and re
lated crops in the United States, be
gins its depredations as soon as tli"
young plants are set out in the spring
and continues its work throughout the
Control measures, to he ef- j
a
sect nj||K( , s ,, s r j,,, ( t *
A , llisi . ( .," ( ,' ltls ,. ( i the total
destru( . UoI1 ..„„im,,«
an;J in , IirKt . „ n . as in Ulf .
years immediately after ils first ap
pea ranee in this country in the sixties,
control measures have n.nv been per
fected to such a degree and adopted
to such an extent
SUli.llit'I
fective, sliculd Itegin as soon as tin in* 1
7
if
to
a
need
I bat losses
not he great. Spray!i g with a solu
tion ' Ii two pounds ul powdered arson
ale ot lead tour pounds of arsenate
of lead In the paste form, or one pound
of purls green to 50 gallons of water
should be begun as soon as the plants
are set out and should lie repeated as
often as examination of the plant
shows it to he ni ci-ssarj
The common cabbage "worm" is tin
larva ot a white niUerliy having black
tipped wings Idn butterflies appear
on warm spring days and continue
about gardens and fields until after
:
,
several «even* fall frosts. In the Gulf
region they are present throughout the
season. Eggs are laid on ahhage and
related plants where they hatch in from
four to eight days.
The caterpillar is velvety green.
for
about the color of the cabbage foliage
It eats voraciously und grows rapidly
becoming full grown Ip from ten to
fourteen days after hatching
generations occur each season 'n the
northeast ana ronably six in the ex
treme South.
Three
Hand picking may be practiced suc
cessfully In small gurdens. Where
sprays are employed they should be
Th» first generation usu
ally develops on svild plants.
be
1
the Prevailing Winter Winds.
tion Is established care should ho
taken to put out such trees ns will
give the maximum amount of body
material and to arrange them so as to
derive the greatest benefit.
Secure Best Results.
In windbreak planting the best re
sults usually are secured when tlio
shortest trees are placed on the side
facing the wind, so that a sloping far«
is presented and the air currents an
deflected upward. These short trees
should have low-branching habits and
dense foliage, In order that they may
offer ns much hindrance to the pas
sage of air currents close to tlio
ground as is possible. The Russian
olive Is probably the best for this.
Not Infrequently, when complaints are
made of the reputed Ineffectiveness
of w indbreaks It develops upon exami
nation that the planter has either
used unsuitable species and given
them poor cure or has failed to estab
lish belts of sufficient width.
be
Ir
a
to
it
Is
for
ani
of
Is
re
may
Species for Northern Region.
The northern half of the plains re
gion, which Includes the eastern por
tion of Montana, Wyoming mid Colo
rado and the western portions of the
Dakotas and Nebraska, Is character
ized by lower temperatures, heavier
precipitation, and a shorter growing
season than the southern half. Tlio
species recommended for It are: Hack
berry, honey locust, white elm, cotton
wood, narrow-leaf cottonwood, white
poplar, white willow, diamond willow,
Russian olive, buffalo berry, Siberian
pen tree. Jack pine, western yellow
pine.
lies
and
few
de
If
will
re
to
ina
Species for Southern Region.
All the appelés recommended for
the northern portion of the plains re
gion may la* planted in the southern
portion, which includes southeastern
Colorado, western Kansas and Okla
homa and northern Texas, and cn ac
count of the more moderate tempera
tures it is possible to extend the list.
The following additional species are
recommended : Box elder, green ash,
black locust, red cedar, Chinese urbor
vitae.
tim
poles
In
as
which
turn
Liken
seleet
| Washington. I> C.
there
Specific information on these spe
cies is published in Farmers' Bulletin
No. 8.88, a copy of which can he ob
tained by applying to the United
States department of agriculture,
I applied In a fine mist, since coarser up
plications tend to gather in drops *>b
j the leaves and run off.
Community action In Aimbntlng tlie
cabbage worm is desirable where , et
cabbage and related crops are grown
extensively,
entered by the truckers of the commu
nity for each to spray throughout the
season and to carefully clean the fields
of the hulk of the old stalks as soon as
the crop is harvested. A few stalks
should be left at regular Intervals as
traps on which the last generation of
female butlerffies will deposit egg*
Such stalks should bo poisoned freely
with arsenleals so that the worms *>f
the last generation will not develop.
i

.
IFl
Agreements should ha
Wher
of
most
re
be
tli"
spring
the
ef- j
»
i
INCREASE SUPPLY OF
CHICKENS AND EGGS it
total
Ulf .
ap- r>
sixties,
per
adopted
in* 1
(Prepared by the l nit**«I Statt» De J
partment of A^nculluiej
Every coiiniuTcial breeder, ev
1 uriner, every buck-yard
» ' ,ri '
poultry raiser, is urged to keep »
these Minis steadily ill view:
1. Keep better poultry. Stand- ri
^ aid-bred poultry improves the
quality and Increases prodtn tion. a
A 2. Select healthy, vigorous t
breeders to produce strong q
chicks. 3
3. Hatch early to produce fall a
and winter layers
>>
!*
need
solu
arson
pound §•
water J tor home
plants
as
plant
tin jj,
black
appear
continue
after
us wla'ii cheap JF
4. 1'reserve t
4
Use.
5. Produce infertile eggs, ex
x>
cept for hutching.
'till the thicks to eliminate
: $
A
<;
:>
, g
unprofitable produis rs
7. Koi p
ill bj>< k-yard
§• Hink to supply tin* family table.
a
8. (iriiw a> nun'll poultry teed
issihle.
as
9. Eat im»n poultry and eggs ^
to (onser\t tlie me. I supply. *j
Gulf
the 3
and
from
green.
Preserve Eggs for Winter.
It is the duty of every farmer not
only to preserve eggs for his own use,
but to urge his friends living In town
to preserve eggs fot next fall und win
ter use.
foliage
rapidly
to
the
ex
Three
Hens in Confinement.
Hens like freedom, hut good feed
and cure reconcile them to confine
suc meut. Mature, rugged birds ofteu lay
Where more eggs in close confinement thuu
be when at liberty.
usu-

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