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The Grangeville globe. [volume] (Grangeville, Idaho) 1907-1922, January 29, 1920, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091099/1920-01-29/ed-1/seq-1/

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The Grangeville Globe
f
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OFFICIAL COUNTY PAPER
I Xffl, NO. 10
GRANGEVILLE, IDAHO COUNTY, IDAHO, THURSDAY, JANUARY 29,1920
$1.50 THE YEAR
N.
N.
of
of
ing
EDUCATIONAL
EMERGENCY
-
EXISTS
I
irtage of Teachers Trace
able to Insufficient Sal
aries Offered.
To
to
MUST DO OTHER WORK
Unskilled Laborers Receive
Better Remuneration Than
High Class Educators.
The present educational emergency
la traceable in practically all its as
pects to the insufficient salaries paid
chers tbruout the country.
cost of Uving has more than
in the last three years, while
increases in teacher's salaries for
MHlnited States in the same time has
been about 12 per cent. As a conse
qqjjbce, nearly half the teachers of the
CMKitry are compelled to spend more
V their salaries.
a chers, as well as other salaried
era, have not had their salaries
ase in anything like the same de
that other workers have. Conse
tly, teachers are constantly being
t
to
'
forced to a lower standard of living
and a resulting lower standard of ef
ficldncy, because they can not meet the
higher demands for rent, food, clothing ;
books, etc.
From various studies of budgets for I
many occupations In relation to the
cost of living, it is estimated that a
minimum salary of $1200 should be es- ■
tablished for tbe entire country, and
paid on the basis of twelve months.
Too many teachers are living below
the the margin of efficiency. Hun
dreds of them returned their question
naires annoted with remarks such as : !
"I Work in a drug store during sum- j
mari" "I do house work for my room
an« board," "I take In sewing to meet j i,
e$ 3 »eiises," "My summer expenses are 1
paid by my family," "I can't save 1
enough money to go to summer school.'j
^Tlaehers art* paid much less than 1
the members of other professional*
ministry, law, medicine, engineering, j
etc. *The minimum salaries are not only !
larger, but the range of salaries is
, , .. , ,
very much greater, thus offering more
promise to the capuhle, the hardwork
lug and the ambitious individual initiiere
This is lacking in j
I
the professions.
teaching.
Tea chera are paid much less than a j
great many of the unskilled luborera
whose preparation Is very much short
er, and whose expenses for "profes
slonal upkeep" are very much le-w.
Exist i ng salaries paid to teachers can !
be said to almost place a penalty upon
adequate preparation, since there Is no
[opportunity for an adequate return
upon the Investment of time and mon
ey «necessary to the securing ot that
preparation.
A teacAr's work is most effectively
done when she is In good health, free
from worry, able to participate in the
ootoumuity activities, and when she
hys the serial respect of the communi
ty. These things make her a leader
moulder of citizens, a creator if l
ils, yet practically all these cl»
ats of success are denied a majority
teachers by the insufficient salue'«
a
t
relative
Sew York C'ly, vj-hlch pays
high salaries when compared with
her rii As, in reality pays its teacher*
I better than the workers in many of
*■ unskilled occupations.
[The study of the salaries of the 2.
;f> draft registrants shows that there
In other lines of work an increase in
lary in direct relation to an in
ease in age, and also in relation to
te increase in the amount of school
>g received.
The additional salary received per
jar of increase age is much less than
fe additional salary received per add*
[ year of schooling.
1
SSOrrtar complete reports for salary
Ampaigns. Price $1.50 a copy. Price
iDccupationa which demand addition
| preparation, with the exception of
thing, received higher minimum
jlariee than those where education l«e
id the elementary schools is not es
itlal.
N. E. A. members aud for salary earn- j
palpus $1.00 per copy.
Permits For Teachers Who Do Not
Hold Regular Teacher's Certificates
School officials and patrons of the
schools in some sections of Idaho !
County fail to understand the position I
of the County Superintendent and that
of the State Superintendent In refus- 1
ing to allow teachers to continue their
work after they have failed in the
Teachers' Examinations. Some people
lege because they have attended col
u
lege or because a certain school has no i
teacher.
The following letter from the State !
Superlntedent, Miss Ethel E. Redfleld
makes it very clear that the only right
course In this matter Is the legal one
Conscientious citizens will not ask
regularly elected officers of the law to
break the laws.
The following lotter was received
from Miss Ethel E Redfleld, State
Superintendent of Schools of the
State of Idaho:
To the County Superintendent of Ida
ho, Greetings»
I am enclosing a statement watch
you may use wherever it will be of
benefit (to you. There is no officer
among the State officials that is asked
to disregard the law he has swora to
uphold except the State Superintend
ent; there is no county official of
whom this request is made except the
County Superintendent. I, for one
feel the Insult. When I am making
(Continued on Page 8.)
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HIGH FIGURES
STATE LAND
;
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a

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LEASES
Ben E. Bush, State Land Ap
praiser Here to Straight
en Out Difficulty
j jten E. Bush of Moscow, state land I
appraiser for northern Idaho, arrived
j i, eTO Tuesday night's train to ml
1 just a ta ngle on In-hulf of the state'
1 that had arose ove r the lapping of ap- !
pn ( . a tions for leasing state lands ln I "
1 this county. f j
Applications for leases, a number
j of them for the same land, situated in '
! the Boles district, across the Salmon
is river, had been received by the state
, , , , , , ,, „ , I
land deimrtment ami Mr. Bush-was
sent here to untangle the difficulty,
initiiere being no prior rights entering j
I
in j into the proposition. which would
I have made settlement easy.
a j
After discussing the matter it was j
found that an agreement between the i
applicants was imi—ssible, and theie
was nothing for the state agent to do
but put the leases up at auction, the
Ivan
!
no
l
being,
principal contestants
Price and Mrs. Lula Lancaster. •
Mr. Price desired an 80-acre tract
out of one section for agricultural
purposes and Mrs. Lancaster wanted
the entire section for grazing. When
the auction opened the bidding became
quite spirited and Mr. Price was forc
ed to pay 70 cents per acrç for one
tract of grazing land, and in turn com
pelled Mrs. Lancaster to i«ay $1.00 per
acre for the section in which he de
sired the 80-acre tract. Forwally
said Mr. Bush, 15 or 20 cents an acre
would be a good price for these leases
COURT POSTPONED.
t
Regular Term for Lewis County is
Deferred by Judge Seales.
of
2.
in
in
to
per
The regular term of the district court
for Lewis county which was set for
Monday, February 2, has been post
poned by Judge Wallace N. Scales
Tbe judge had made arrangements to
depart for Neziieree on Sunday but on
conversing with the officers of that
county it was deemed advisable to post
|K>ne the >eim owing to the influenza
Just when the term will be eovened
will 'depend on the subsiding of the
1 epidemic. «
. „ „ .
John Edward Melberson, aged 57.
years, 0 months and 23 days, died at
the family residence In this city early
this morning, the 29th, leaving the
J. E. MePHERSON DEAD.
of
l«e
Well Known Pioneer Passed Away
Hite Morning From Diabetes.
es
j
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1
Board of Health Adopt Strict Quarantine Regulations to Assist
in Avoiding Spread of Disease;
Public Places Closed
FLU" EPIDEMIC CONDITIONS
NOT SERIOUS; INVADES
MANY FAMILIES
u
i
!
si
on
to
of
The presence of a number of cases
Grangeville the first of the week
prompted the necessity of formulating
and meeting the emergency of an epi
demic, and acting on instructions re
ceived from the state board of health
Mayor Campbell called a meeting of
the board of health of the City of
Grangeville, consisting of Dr. B. Chip
man. chairman, aud couiicllmeu Idngo
and Riutcel, to meet with the physi
cians of Grangeville, on Tuesday eve
ning. The county superintendent. Su
perintendent Duke ns, and Mrs. B. Lan
ningham representing the local chapter
of the Red Cross were present.
The sentiment of all who were pres
ent, including local physiealns, was
that prompt and strict measures be
' taken to prevent the epidemic from be
coming serious. And as a first pre
caution Dr. Chipman stated that a
quarantine of all reported cases In the
city would he had, and requested the
doctors to report all east's and at the
; same time he procured a statement
I of absences from school with a view
of Investigating cases In the city
I where no physician had been called
; It was determined to close all public
! schools, hut no steps were planned at
the meeting, this matter being left
open.
Tuesday hand hills were ordered
printed und placards made for posting
asking the iteople of the city to co
operate with the board of heulth in
getting control and stamping out the
get
It was asked that every' one movf j
along and tend strictly to their husi
ness, not to gather In public places j
stay at. home, and to report all case- \
flu.
I ,, , . .
as 800,1 ns pofif,,We to Dr - ® h, P man j
and above all to observe the qua ran- ;
„ . ,
0 whon fam,,,os wore Quarantined
! , The i '"' roasins m,mber of ohll(lren ^
I " ,8e,,t frmv soll<M>I either by reason
f j brin * "L or 0,1 »«»«"* of «""«ng •
takon w,t of ^l.ool by parents to piy
in ' von }" th0 ,1,soaso ' "
adv an, » te l " the ,lf Superb.-,
on,lo, ' t ^enn and the meml>ers of .
I the school board to clos«* the sch«K>ls.
" 1 ><■ l»Mid^ < (
j ' 11 1 1 a< tlllL " 1111 ai " l< ° *• ( 'ùl' i
I man. requested t:hat the mayor order
!
all pi(ux's of public amusement and
gatherings to suspend until further
order, nnd the picture show was clos
ed, and pool hall proprietors were in
structed to cover tables, remove chairs
j
i
do
and prevent loafing in their places of
business.
The hotels were also in
structed to keep their lobbies clear
nnd cards were printed and put up in
all business places requesting people
to move along. These regulations and
rules irnosed by the board of health
will be stricty enforced, ami violators
will be prosecuted if the necessity
should arise.
Local business men all expressed
willingness to cooperate heartily with
the board of health to enforce the
rules against congregating and loaf
ing and to keep the crowd moving un
til the situation should be relieved
Another police officer was put on to
assist In enforcing the regulations aud
minors will Hot under any circum- j
stances be permitted to be on the j
de
is
widow and five children, three boys
and two girls, to mourn his taking
away. The children, all of whom re
side In and near Grangeville, are as
follows; Howard, Marion, Glenwood,
Mrs. Minnie Chamberlain and Mrs.
Zettle Chamberlain.
for
to
on
the
residence In the southeast part of the
city at 2:30 Friday afternoon. W. N.
Koox officiating, and E. 8. Hancock
Funeral services will be held at the
funeral director.
Decease«! was horn In Missouri and
•ante to Idaho manv years ago where
he engaged in farming. For the r>a«t
cveral years he tins resides! in th's
city, hving amass 'd a considerabl«
'fortune from his busin<»ss oiieratl'n«
„.He had been-a s-fferer for the nast
57.
at flv< ' years rom d,, ' ^ , H, ' " as * e
<»n the streets early this week and
the contracted a alight attack of the "fn"
si coots or in business places, except
on giHHl excuse, and will ho expected
to stay at homo during the continuance
of the present regulations. The offi
cers a«re instructed to enforce this
provision strictly.
a
at
in
Although there are a number oi
eases in tbe city, only a few have been
However it was
reported serious,
thought liest to take steps to pre
vent the spread of the epidemic and
get it under control and not to wait
until conditions got so bad that there
would be small chance of handltng
the situation. Hearty cooiieration ol
everyone will make the task more
pleasant for the board of health and
city officials and will assist in cut
ting dow the number of cases so that
the epidemic will soon pass and or
dinary business be resumed.
The state department of public wel
fare Is kept busy sending out litera
ture regarding the influenza, with
statements of the condition now pre
valent over tin' state, and giving ad
vice in connection therewith. Among
them is the following:
"This office urges that the commun
ities not become alarmed, but calmly
view the situation, assist the local
health officers by refraining from at
tending gatherings of any kind what
soever, as the foremost authorities on
public health agree that places of pub
lie gatherings are breeding spots' for
the transmission of the contagion.
"For the protection of those mein
j hors of the family who have not oon
tractod the "Flu,"" when an Inmate of
j their household is down, it is essen -
\ tian that all dishes and tableware be
.
j before being used or placed in
; contact with other dishes, etc.
Here
again the foremost medical men agree
^ •»'« ***** avenue of the contagion,
Keep thp home proiierly ventilated and
• when coughing or sneezing is* sure to
cover .te mouth and nose with a
" handkerchief. This is called
let infection" and medl<-al men recog
of . nize it ns an im,-riant avenue for the
transmission i f the contagion.''
( Opinions of Diysiriaiis.
i From the daily press we glean the
_
'•drop
following exproslons from well known
! liysicians :
"All attempts by army physicians to
determine last year how influenza Is
communicated were unavaiing."
"Atmospheric and climatic conditions
bring out influenza and quarantining
does not limit or confine it."
"Persons who have the proper blood
pressure do not contract the disease,
and those whose pressure is low do,
quarantine or no quarantine."
"There is no more use in quarantin
ing against influenza than against
mosquitoes."
But it goes without saying that if
you aix- ill the proper place for you
is at home and hot on the streets, and
to overcome the disease you wust stuy
willitti the home and observe the rules
that i.uvi been laid down by the phy
sicians if you expect, to recover. Care
and the strict observance of the phy
in
of
in
in
the
un
to
aud
j sicians orders is what Is needed for
the j speedy recovery.
boys which aggravated the disease with
which he was afflicted,
re
as
Mrs.
b * ,ERE FR0M MISSOULA.
Frea Bangs, a former resident of
this community, arrived here early thlt
eek and may decide to again take ui
residence in this section. Some
the years ago Mr. Bangs in company with
N. hts 1(U rents and other members of th(
family, became associated with the
business life of Grangeville, having
the |,| s
and
ui connected with the printing in
«lus try. The family movt-d away and
r>a«t ***** younger Mr. Bangs entere«
th's ' airomobile business la Montana
* H an expert on many lines of can
»-ith particular reference to the Bulek
nast 'f matters now under discussion ma
e " nl re to the satisfaction of thos«
and «"torested Mr. Bangs will enter th
"fn" work here.
RECEIVED FINE BROOD SOW.
W. E. Itryant, Kreeder of Spotted Po
land China Hogs, Adds Fine Animal.
W. E. Bryant, one of our well
known farmers and breeders of the
S|«otted Poland China hogs, this week
received a tine brood sow from Bain
bridge, Indiana. Tills sow while young :
is u well developer! sjiociiuen, and will
no doubt be a valuable addition to i
his brooding pons. Mr. Bryant has j
been engaged in brooding tbo spotted
type of hogs for a number of years j
and has taken interest sufficient in j
the gume to exhibit ills best specimens
at the fairs of the surrounding coun
try and by the judicious use of print
er's ink is now reaping his reward for
close attention to the business.
PUNCH HOARDS MUST GO. ,
stated They Afford Minors chance to
I
Gamble and I .ose Money.
Idaho county officers have been re
celviug numerous complaints, but not
HUpjwrted with sufficient evidence t<
issue warrants of arrest, ou account
of dealers using punch boards to en
trade in their establishments.
1111,1
boards have afforded an opportunity j
to many minors to gamble and lose con- ;
sfderable sums of money. The of- 1
fleers announce that they will make
an effort to round up the evidence, by
detectives, if necessary, and that this
baneful practice must be ended. Per
sons patronizing punch boards will
also be prosecuted.
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DARKLANTERN
OPERATIONS
TABOOED
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Old-Time Democrats Want
Nugent Nominated But no |
Hybrid Ticket.
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Boise, Idaho, Jam 20.—The little
coterie of Boise Democrats, chiefly
federal officials, who put in much time
concocting political schemes, received
ii severe and unexpected jolt recently.
They have been holding meetings with
Non]«artisan leaguers and labor n,gi
a
tutors In an endeavor to tlx up a fn- j
sion that would r turn Nugent to the ;
Senate and elect, if possible, a hybrid
ticket of state officials.
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conclusion «'xpressisl himself in force
^ i
fill fa.nirungc asserting that the Demo
'■
ernts outside of Boise were sick and
tirrri of the Boise gang nnd all Its
work.
Tin 1 other day a Democratic wnr
liors** from one <'f the cow counties
dropjari into Boise and was Invited |
me of three conferences, and at its
Is
if
t
p f
"We will meet in state convention,"
he said, "and will give Nugent his re
nomination with whatever unity nnd
enthusiasm we can command, and
then we will tell the Boise bunch to go
away baeft and sit down and wo will
nominate n ticket of old-time Demo
crats and puri«ose to go It alone with
out nny more fusion and confusion of
the kind that has brought the party
into disrepute.
,'We are tired of slates and dark
lantern methods; of secret bargain
with leaguers, anarchists and I. W
W.'s and purpose to hold a convention
that will l«e a body of Democrats act
uated solely by a desire for the best
Interests of the state, nation and
party.
"I would advise you gentlemen tr
cease your activities for you certainly
are going to hear something drop at
the convention."
ANNONYMOI'S LETTERS.
The Globe Is In rere.pt of an an
of imnvmous communication from one of
our neighboring towns this week ae
ui remosnl.xl with a request for its pub
Mention It has always been the poll
,, of this nicer, well as most all
other reputable publications, to give
the | no j,,». > to unsiime<l contributions.
•"tlv the article does not ap
in j .^* r |n this Issue.
-n——
SHIPS FINE FAT HOGS.
Plvde Hamt'l shinned one of the
iv. s t our loads of fat hoes Tuesday
*b*t hns le«t the prairie In many j
, "' >on ' , TW ' vor ° 00 h ~" rt of ho «PM
to th«> ahtno'cnt and thov «voteh'*d
Thov were sent to
th- . Spoka>re and the price to
I*'Of »fl«
the nradnrer was 15 rents per pound
CORN SILAGE
FOR CATTLE
AND SHEEP
Po
the
:
will
to i
has j
j
in j
for
University of Idaho Extension
Division Makes Comparison
of Grain and Silage
COSTS LESS; BETTER
, -
to Interesting Article Prepared
by E. F .Rinehart, Field
Animal Husbandman
I
re
not
t<
en
Numerous inquiries us to the Com
Iterative value of corn silage and «1
1111,1 falfa hay have been received recently,
j sture i>est results are secured by feed
con- ; j„g y M , ( WO together, a comparison is
of- 1
make
Alfalfa hay Is an
difficult to nutke.
unbalanced ration containing an excess
by
this
Per
will
of protein and a shortage' of sugar and
starch. Oorn silnge is an unbalanced
ration containing an excess of sugar
and starches and a shortage of pro
lein. The combination of the two
tetris makes a balanced ration where
I there is but little waste to be thrown
; off.
Value of Corn Silage.
A very common practice is to esti
mate good silage worth five-eighths
the value of liny—that is, when hay te
worth $16 |K-r ton, silage Is worin $10
1 st ton. Other sections take It at
I one-half the value of hay, and some,
j especially those of the east, at one
| thiid. The Indiana station, as a «'suit
1 of carefully cheeked Investigations, ar
! rives at the following conclusion In
ikrtnparlng the value of silage wth
| K - r ain.
Grain |»er
Silage iK>r ton
$ 5.00
$ 0.00
$ 8.00
$ 10.00
$ 12.00
i-wt.
$1
$1.50
$ 2.00
$250
$3.00
little
chiefly
time
with
n,gi
Silage for Sheep.
Corn silage free from mold and not
too old, promotes thrift and kooi>s the
digestive tract, in condition. While the
amount that lias boon fed successfully
fn- j
the ; to I'rwiHnt ewes varies' from ono to
live |M«unds, a safe rule is to terri two
hybrid
: iNHiuds ,«cr head dully in comblnatlo.
with alfalfa hay. After lambing, the
proper I ion can lie increased.
A number of Idaho range men make
j t.lie practice of reserving the silage
! until nflor lambing time. This Is In
force- , , ,, . .
i order that the milk now may tie In
Demo- , , . ,
'■ creased as the lain!) grows larger.
and
Its
wnr
Invited |
its
It is only recently that the value
of corn silage as a ration for lessen
ing the cost of fattening sheep has
been recognized. In chocking results
with seven trials. It was foond that
100 pounds of good corn silage saved
eight iMiunds of corn and 44 pounds of
clover hay. Counting coni at 3 cents
per pound and clover hay at $15 per
ton, silage had a value of $11.40 per
ton. Besides cheapening the gains by
the addition of silage, a better finish
was usually the result, although not
always. In feeding both cattle and
sh«>op, the result depends largely upon
p f ^,the quality of tbe silage and the care
In feeding.
re
nnd
and
go
will
Demo
with
of
party
dark
W
act
best
and
Silare for Steers.
In Tdnho. reevo-ds have been kept
on over 40ft head of steers fed silage
compared with 4ftft fed hav alone.
Tnklmr 1ftft head of each that made
the smallest «jins, the results are
somewhat In favor of the hav. Taking
tftft hond of each that did the best
the results are in favor of the silage
tn the latter case, these were with the
most careful feeders hence the results
nr» no««iblv «hove the average. At
»nv rate, much better eare and moie
attention has been given bv these men
than tn the ease of many feeders. The
result of the best lots are as follows
Hav alone, nverage Daily gain. 1.67
pounds.
tr
at
an
of
ae
pub
poll
all
give
ap- _ Hay and Silage, average dally gam
1.88 pounds.
As the best of care was given and
the feeders in both cares were of e.x
the «»«lient types, the possible^ xplanatlon
is tliat the sreond ration was well
many j planned ami balanced.
ho «PM R ^ uUh <rf 10 • v< * ars ' «***»***«' of
«voteh'*d th» «'xnerlment stations throughout the
to com belt show that silage cheapens a
to ration. It does not necessarily Increase
(Continue«! on Page 4.)
pound

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