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The Grangeville globe. [volume] (Grangeville, Idaho) 1907-1922, February 12, 1920, Image 6

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091099/1920-02-12/ed-1/seq-6/

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CHUMS OF
l
TO LOWDEN
;
Birthplace of|
j
Backs
Sunrise, Mien..
Ill nois Gover or.
Him for President.
THE LOWDEN SWIMMING HOLE
E.rly Fitenrt, of Governor Ste Village '
Famous as Cradle of Pres,dent
-'■Born in Sunrise and Been i
Awake ever Since.
I
I
cpy little village
it gi«i, has found a
Sunrise, Minn., u
I
with u population
l'i.l,,! s 1ms
(in- politics
place i
put the village on III
mi it ex
u>l
tiicrc. Cor ,jov. Frank j
if the lead- ,
pectb to stay
O. Lowdcn of iliinol
one
Republican
was born In
His boy
lihors are con
III» tlinisi in'fin tliem.
f'U
candidates
lag
prt*.M<l» ritiuj f ion,
Sunrise fifty-nine years
hood rhums and i
scions of >hc fa
;t enlliusiastio Lowden
■ he country Is
Perhaps tin
fer -president
the one
the village hull, now it. Andrew Lind's
urns
'lull in
> that meets In Sunrise, now in
general store.
It is many years since the Loudens
in Sunrise—more
made their home
than half a century, in fact—but the
village has never forgotten the family,
least of all "little Frank."
The old
Lowden, the gov
had ills blacksmith
shed where Lorenzo
ernor's lather,
shop, still stands. It is the property
of tiie Lowden children, used only for
storage purposes- and for the ghost
games which, the folk say, were start
ed by Frank Lowden. The Lowden
home still stands, too. It Is an old
fashioned dwelling that occupies a rise
of ground two miles from the village.
There is a third building in Sunrise
that figured in the governor's boyhood.
That, is the schoolhouse. Lorenzo
Lowden helped to buHd It so ids boy
could have a schooling. The one-room
structure Is hut a stone's throw from
tiie blacksmith shop: It is no longer
a school, having been succeeded by a
more modern building, hut is now the
village hull. A picttirs of the Illinois
governor hangs on the wall, and un
der its roof the Lowden club holds
meetings.
The Sunrise folk are full of stories
about Frank Lowden.
"He was a studious child," said
Henry Voss, one of the governor's
schoolmates. "After he had learned
to read he used to walk hack and forth
between the sf-hool and home, a dis
tance of two miles, carrying q book
before ills face. The boys would speak
to him and lie wouldn't answer. If
we annoyed him when he wgs interest
ed he would stop and trounce us. Or,"
Voss added, with u twinkle, "at least
he'd try to." •
In a bend of the river near town Is
tiie swimming hole where Frank's
career was almost cut short. The hoy
was passionately
ami In the spring could scarcely wait
for the tee to go out.
"See right over there in tiie center7"
asked VÔSM. "That's where Frank
nearly drowned. Trying to do what
the older and stronger boys did he
got up on the springboard and plunged
off in ten feet of water. The«. Voss
saw his head boh up, go down, come
up a second lime and again disappear.
Theo dived In, a few feet down the
current, caught him by the hair and
dragged him ashore. We poured tiie
water out of him and in u few minutes
he was a slight ns ever."
"Lowden's swimming hole" is still
popular with the boys of the neighbor
hood.
Many of the governor's old friends
are now at North Branch, ten miles
from Sunrise. Among them is S. W.
Runyan, who had something to do
with Frank's education.
fond of the
water
"I taught Frank to hunt squirrels,"
said Runyan.
We covered ninny n
mile of this country with our gun and
dogs."
The Lowdens left Sunrise In the
late sixties.
Tiie last picture of
Frank s boyhood that remains
the old residents is Hint of a sturdy
little chap, dressed for travel, march
ing off down I lie road behind tiie
"prairie schooner" that bore all the
Lowd.-u effects to their
Iowa. There
with
new home in.
was nothing forlorn
about the picture. The boy was cheer
ful, wideawake and on the lookout for
something to do.
Alertness was ehar
v acte rtstic - csQn&n
bald Henry Voss, the village philos
> oplier, speaking ot hi
"Frank was Uor4
J and it kind of nppe
.. been awake ever since."
q
iiik
f
he has
rs xnu
Ä 30 AVIAM
% ___
** wwwm-To-fgtw-yewees
*1
* Harvest. ^AnA a A
Mar of *ttre rdlvfrshy ft
resigned as president of the Illinois
Agricultural assiH^t^ijtl, dLvirte,
entire time to orgnnlzatlofi" w
among the fiyri
In the Interest
his
?
(>rk
FrunfcO.
denis candidacy for president*' 11 !!
4hW»?«-fMHÎAf North and South Da
«■LI Minnesota. Wisconsin. Michi
gan, Iowa, Nebraska, Colorado
iMlkm. t« tht . f, tr || r „
WW:
and
IRASCIBLE MEN OF GENIUS
,n J
and Charles Reaa«
j
Morris
William
Notable for Their Explosive Tem
and Kindly Hearts.
pcrs
reminiscences Mr.
that the two
recent
In
some
Henry G. Barnwell savs
literary men «
cssed the greatest capacity for iu
William Morris and
Morris was perhaps
>f Ills acpiaintance who
; IH'Ss
digmitlon
were
n,urk '"
j the mure
explosive; hut his tetnpera
iver and
mental oulhlirstl
w ere soon
The violence
though frequently
summer tempest,
the precursor of a
sequel.
bad rarely any
of Charles Rende.
It, too, passed like a
sometimes
I
punishment
, 1S t | u , of
was
prolonged literary or legal battle; for
he had a passion
nation Is lot
the tni—Teillll
oil !" Mr. Barn-,veil once heard Morr!»
roaring as he ««»•' «'*'** 1"' S . ^T'rhe
Inquiry brought out the fact that the
. * -
villainy for
was
for litigation.
good for him;
ought to he boiled in
"Assas
sud
deemed .suitable
Which
aase
WWW**
m
0 :
m
snl
Si
a j
Be
m
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y
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an)
II:
ini.
ILS
j ü
Tfr
Having sold my farm and moving to another locality, will sell at Public Auction
at what is known as the old Harmon place, four miles north of Denver, seven miles
east of Cottonwood, and ten miles northwest of Grangeville, commencing at 10
O'clock on
fy
m
WED. FEB. 18
IS
The following described property:
!
ru
L
ru
IS
13 HEAD HORSES
;
: 3
y
1 Bay team, 3 years old, weight 3000
1 team, grey and black, 9 years old weight 2800
1 .team, grey and black, 9 years old weight 3000
1 team, brown anA black, 5 years old, wgt. 2400
1 2-year-old bay colt, weight 1300
1 Bay yearling colt, weight 1200
1 Grey yearling colt, weight 1200
2 sucking colts, black and grey
The four teams mentioned above will be sold
with harness. Some extra collars and harness
will be sold separately. * ,
o
%
c..
G
f
G
9 HEAD CATTLE
C=U U
m
m
«HJ1
■V
1 Red cow, 2 years old, with 2 calves at foot
1 Red cow, 4 years old, fresh about April 1
1 Roan cow, 2 years old, with calf at foot
3 2-year-old heifers, fresh about April 1
>
m«m
Dfe
'4'
"QJÊ
m
CL,
«
i
u
a
mméé
<&■*> X
y
ms
1 Brood sow, with pigs four weeks old.
m
1 Big Boned Spotted Poland China boar, from W. E. Bryant's herd.
Papers furnished
Eg
T
FARM MACHINERY, HOUSEHOLD GOODS, ETC.
mg
mg
Eg
: 1 Uw'Mo tractor, 15-25, with three
hottoni I*. 4 I». plow, all in good
3 condititNi
ÿ 1 International 1-ton truck
jj 1 McCormick binder, 8-foot
I 1 »lolin I>ccre double disc harrow
1 1 John Deere 3-section drag
= 1 Oliver gang plow, 14-ineh
§ 1 McCormick combine,
D seasons
1 two-bottom disc plow
1 three-bottom disc plow
1 10-foot Monitor double disc drill
1 drag cart
1 bobsled
1 light bobsled
1 3*4 Studebaker wagon with hay rack
1 3-inch Webber wagon with hay rack
1 slip scraper
1 Jackson fork
5 log chains
Some whiffle trees and eveners
2 fanning mills
3 wooden barrels
1 iron barrel
6 hen coops
1 12-nest hen-setter
2 or 3 dozen chickens—White Wyan
dotte .
Hie usual amount of junk
1 wooden bedstead and springs
1 iron bedstead and springs
I rocking chair
1 tabaret
I center table
1 commode
Some kitchen chairs
1 heating stove
Some fruit jars
20 gallons home made soap
Ej
E=
Eg
Ep
m
used two
i—
=
ifü
V
LUNCH SERVED AT NOON
in]

.h
ifo
Mis-, I
T - n/.'h snnasl.
m
AVIAM
and under, cash; all sums over that amount time
- ww Be given to October f 1920, on approved bankable notes bearing 10 percent
mteitest. No property to .be removed until settled for.
\ CI 1S\ ' I " * 1,1 ■'S'tw.o nil n<avla Rl stoIT
/I , ) i n * 1 * H 'b »di insfiMip
v niifî Sf!l ito ,R(»hj|o,| ■
M moiwifs s,'IT
'/inmuM
'j
y
e :
XOA]
m
IU2
a û
Es
l
El HERITAGE,
ip B
l'»<lBd
vd') i
m
biniilj
<iom»*in id
i enrori dgln llsw „ ,
nom elttli nl augnlm M„>
P
* )'jp,ii.iT .
Ml 1
15
v
FIRST NA
„ By A.KJ DÏ
f. I
<>'J
st
**n 11J
ytusi I
OWNER
Irj
HARRY C. CRANKE,
Auctioneer.
''-'lia V|i(n»ii-e_- ,
^lerk
I-V
•I
I!*:
n.oq .„•»
I *i tisvii »,fi> M\tni
->iJ
Mn;up*i/. j ,f)
.I«*»,
>d l»ip;
'
placing the pockets or a new suit ib
their coaveotloMi position instead of
arranging them in a novel and inter
esting manner, suggested by Morris,
j But the unimaginative tailor was not
boiled; moreover, when, shortly af
! lerward, he fell into difficulties, it was
j Morris who advanced hlnl money
enough to set him on his feet again.
Possibly Rende, who also was a gen
erous-hearted man, might at need have
shown equal magnanimity toward'a
cobbler who aroused his ire. The man
had been recommended by his friend,
Wilkie Collins, and the next time the
two novelists met Rende lifted his
voice from afar. *
"Confound you!" he shouted iras
cibly. "Tlint cobbler you sent to me
is a fraud—a rascal—a rogue—a
triple-dyed villain ! He ought to be
Choked with his own shoe pegs!"
Wilkie Collins, laughing, attempted
some defense of his protege ; hut
Reade would not listen.' Lifting his
hands to heaven like an Oriental call
l 1 "-' down the vengeance of the gods.
ne declared impressively. In true east
ern style:
"May the heels of the conscience
less wretch who recommended such a
cobbler be 'blistered, and may his
Joints he cramped ! May bunions vis
it his great toe and corns sit upon his
little one. and the wrath of the enemy
destroy his sole !"
Then, satisfied with the achievement
of an Impromptu curse at once harm
less and horrifying, he accepted Col
lins' Invitation to luncheon, und the
two walked amicably away together.
—Youth's Companion.
The Tunisian Posts.
The postal courier service of Tunis
which ran between the years 1805 and
1875 is described in the "Revues Tuni
sienne" by Mr. Marcel Gandolphe. The
service covered the distance between
Tunis and Susa tip to 1868, and then it
was extended to Sfax. The distance
between Tunis and Susa—a dangerous
Journey over not too easy country—
was performed in 24 hours anil at on*
»
« tnty once was me Tunis
stretcn.
courier behind his time, by 12 'hours,
and that wrb the result of haiiM-aistng
adventure. In 1864 times were ceis
taluly not good for couriers and way
laying on the road was not uncommon.
At-that period there were only two
running out of the three Mohammeds,
who for many years had shared the
Boutefeu. Bécassine and L*
duty.
Chameau were names bestowed ui>qp
them, the first because of his vivacity,
the second because of his svelte ap
pearance, and the third becntise of his
stature. The story of these dauntless
three of the Tunisian postal service
in the light of the latest aerial postal
Innovations Is of almost prehistoric
flavor.
We'll Say He Loves Her.
Gwendoline sighed softly, and wept
"Harold !" she blubbered. "You do
not love ane."
The young man started violently,
knitted his brow fiercely, and un ex
cjiod flush enveloped his countenance
GRANGE VILLE PEOPLE |
APPENDICIW]
Grangevilli* pe opl# J
usipg simple glycerine, i 1(lcka * L
bark, etc-, as mixed lu Adler l-kj^T I
flushes BOTH upper and ]„ w — •
so completely It removes all
cumulated poisons from «n
canal
PREVENT
Mauy
er
foul,
and
prevents
«Mien
Adler-i-ka relieves ANY Case
stomach or sour stomach.
In on,. r
chronic stomach trouble < i\e
produced wonderful result.
»8
Cures constipation.
'■a*
GLANVILLE DRUG Q Mp^
Application, for Grazing c.._ ||||
Notice is hereby given that all i
tlong for permits to graze ■ le Tk
and sheep within the NEZri uc» w
TION FOREST during the m
must be tiled in my office m t;r»n
Idaho on or before February ir, nJS*
V. FULLAWAY JR.. Supervi *
Jtc h
Rooms for Rent—Three fumjj
rooms. Enquire of WM. V. Eßg
4 ;

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