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The Grangeville globe. [volume] (Grangeville, Idaho) 1907-1922, March 17, 1921, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091099/1921-03-17/ed-1/seq-5/

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United Americans Outline Work For
Year
Caution as to I. W. W.
Boise, Idaho., March 14.—A bulletin |
just issued by the United Americans
Dr. j
succeed j
manager, re- j
cites the plans for 1921 and utters a
word of caiftion to the puhlie bear 1
ing on the I. W. W. situation,
bulletin is in (»art as follows:
announces the apiioiutnient 'of
Frederick Viuing Fisher to
Frank À. Chase as state
1 he
I
Idaho has many valuable organi/a
lions, but the United Americans move
ment is the one impartial, co-opera- !
tive movement of all organizations and
all loyal citizens regardless of party, :
creed, class or race for the mainten
government j
and the inherited right of all and for t
the common welfare of all the people
of Idaho.
âne« of constitutional
j
191b by j
some of the loyal outstanding men of I
the state, during 1920 leading men of
all walks Of life from over two-thlrda
of the counties of Idaho subscribed
Campaign Effort«.
Organized in the fall of
to its principles, entered its ranks
as
active workers and gave freely to its
work. During the last year practical
ly every important state and Io-hI
body has officially indorsed the Uni'
ed American movement in Idaho.
The intensive
outdoor speaking ;
campaign carried on during the sum- i
mer and fall of 1920 was remarkably
successful despite the handicap of sick
ness. The staff visited over 50 towns
in the strategic centers
Idaho,
«poke to over 50.000 and indirectly
reached half the population of the i
state, held over 100 meetings and or
ganized 42 important centers for
vor * î '
This campaign had a far reaching j
Influence in counteracting the
of
cam- j
palgn of dlsoontent and unrest and
hatred and In clearing the atmosphere |
«nd rallying the people to constructive i
Americanism.
It8 effect is still felt
over the state.
1
!
I W. W. Activities .
The («ate headquarters is in touch 1
with the acute, dangerous situation '
caused by the renewal of the activities I
of the I. W. W. in Idaho. In oo-oper
a tion with the state constabulary, it
has carefully kept its eye on this field,
Practically every man sworn to over
throw the government who is in and
about Idaho is known and registered.
This is extremely important,
state chairman. O. O. Haga, of the
well known legal firm of Richards A
Haga of Boise, have offered their
vices freely to the county and rfate at
torneys In the trial ofl. W. W. cases.
The growing gravity of the situation
Is revealed in the fact that there
The
ser
are
known to be 288 red card men (I. W.
W. ) in and around Boise. These men, |
hold no respect for the consti
tion, the law or the Stars and Stripes,
are working Insidiously to poison the
minds of others, particularly laboring
men. who are fundamentally sound as \
to loyalty but who are being worked j
on craftily.
v i.
U- j
The need of United American work j
in Idaho is extremely important and !
the scope of its work Is measured bv |
available funds and voluntary co-oper- ;
«lion of the loyal men and women of ;
tin state.
/
uJü|P
STRAW SAILORS AND
HATS OF LISERE HERE
We have just receiv
ed a shipment of smart
new sailors. They come
in 'most, every shade
you know, including
street shades and bright
sports colors of cherry
and jade.
large, dashing shapes,
either droopy or rolling
sweepingly back frmi
the brow.
New shipments of the
latest things in hats
weekly.
A line of ladies suits,
coats and dresses ex
pected the last of the
week.
New black and navy
blue lisere hats arrived
at the same time. These
are for the most part
Everything reason
ably priced.
SUITS, CLOAKS AND DRESSES FOR EASTER
THE BATTY MILLINERY
|
DOING YOUR JURY DUTY.
One reason that juries disagree.
j render verdicts for the accused, in
j cases w here »he latter are aligned with
j disloyal orgauizationg, is that theiv
sympathizers are eager to get on th"
1 Juries and loyal
or
men seem to l*e anx
in us to keep off.
I Avoidance of jury service may be
excused in the ordinary run of casei,
hut there should be no attempt to do
! so when the public welfare is Involve i.
and more especially
: runs to safety of our government,
when the issue
Nothing so encourages such organ
j izatious for Instance, as the i. W. W.
t as to secure acquittal for one of its
organizers prosecuted under the
syn
j dicalism law of Idaho. He is permit
ted to go on distributing sediHous
j literature, advocatiug destruction if
I crops and machinery
and creating
anarchistic sentiment. Moreover, he is
enabled to secure other emissaries of
this real cause, for has ndt the dang
er of imprisonment been minimized?
The thought should he held firmly
In the mind of every loyal iuhii and
woman that it Is his and her duty to
accept jury duty when called on and
go into the Jury box open minded, gtv
; ing the accused and the public an ah
i selntely fair and square deal,
FOR FREIGHT REDUCTIONS
Boise, Idaho, March 14.—The stron
ly expressed desire of Idaho shippers
tor freight reductions, has verged to
i a large measure of coperution in solv
ing the problems upon which rate re
auctions rest, notably 'the wage sit
nation. The advance in rates was
j based on an advance in wages, the
j two going together,
railroad wages materially increased,
| representing over $600,000,000 in the
i nuton, hut the railroad
Not only were
adminlstra
tion during wnr time federal control
1 put into effect agreements of n uni
! form nature that have proven im
1 ra< ' nsely expensive,
' T,le lmLi,,naI la,MI1 ' board has been
I ^''ling hearings on these questions
a,ul serious study of the evidence is
,a *i"g given by Idaho shippers and
"tbers interested in this vital sub
^ ect
With both shippers and
railroads
agreed that rate reductions that would
not prove ruinous to the carriers are
desirable in the interest of tonnage
movements and general development
and prosperity, the mutual conslder
taion beiug given the elements enter
ing into any ultimate decision, it is
the conviction of leading authorities
that nothing will be permitted to
stand In the way of fair official ad
| Justment
The evidence adduced at the labor
hoard hearings is being carefully read
in Idaho and various bodies are ex
\ peeted to express themselves so soon
j as a proper analysis is possible,
Reading the Evidence.
j
One of the interesting developments
j at the hearings show that 'the war
! time agreements operate adversely be
| cause of their lack of uniformity nnd
; elasticity, not being adaptable to the
; widely variant conditions existing in
different parts of the country.
The
urg**n«-.\ of miNliliintions of the wagv
wale for common labor wax also ills
okuMHl in view of the apparent neces
sity of a reduction in wage« paid gen
erally by other Industries
railroads.
Nothing was brought out indicating
that the carriers advocated a read
justment of wages paid skilled labor,
although a desire
modification of the war-time rules so '
as to facilitate the movement of traf
fic. provide proper control and pro
duce practical efficiency.
Rules That Prove Costly.
The rules themselves were present
ed ns allowing unnecessary costs 'hat
militate against rate reductions. For
example, under one rule covering con
tinuous and called service, there was
cited an award to a machinist for
10% hour« pay for work performed
during a spread of eight hours. Such
eases, it. was pointed ont, were numer
ous.
and the
set out for
was
Under another rule, covering emer
gency road service, in one case a com
pany was isimpelled to pay four men
a total of 112 hours, at 67 cents an
hour each, or $75.04, for work which j
would have occupied one man 18 hours'
and 12 minutes, which at 67 cents an
hour
vould have amounted to $12.20
a difference of $62.84.
One car repairer was paid $1000 j
one of those rules for service |
never performed and the same amounlt
of overtime was pai dhis force.
With a storm in sight, an engineer
insisted on repairs being made to a
window light in his cab. Under
another rule, it exist five hours for
what could have beeu done in 30 tuin
under
utes besides the train was delayed
an hour and a half. This was due to
the restrictions as to who should per
form that particular work.
An Expensive Leak.
A leak in a boiler, a trivial mat
ton - , under one rule called out three
skilled men and three helpers where
as It is claimed one man and helper
could do the work in the same time.
The mere matter of adustijig a head
light called similar large service into
play under this rule.
Many hundreds of such cases were
cited in detail.
There are 182 of these rules, as re
[»orted by Idaho shippers who have
gone over them.
The enforcement of these rules has
not only resulted in inefficient service
to the public, as claimed, but is
known to have cost heavily.
For work not performed at all it
was brought out at the Chicago hear
ing the railroads paid $6,500,000 in
six months tinder the punitive payment
rule.
The interest of shippers, as stated,
is to aid In securing such equitable'
changes as will affect rates downward.
w/.v.v w.vvwAVAmw
i -...
5
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Vas
By PETER B. KYNE
5
Ï
Autho/ of
^ "Cappy Rieka,'* "The Valley
of tha Giants," etc.
wwwwwwvwwwwwwv
(Copyright, by Peur B. Kyat)
Continued from page thi*«
CHAPTER XII.
Arrived at San Miguel do Padua
about midnight. Webster found the
climate temperate, in fact, decidedly
cool. Billy was waiting for them nnd
was properly amazed, hut not scan
dalized when Don Juan Cnfetero,
abusing the station hands in a horri
ble hodgepodge of English and Span
ish, superintended the landing of the
baggage on the platform.
"I had to bring him with me." Web
ster explained. "I'm going lo wean
him, and after that baby quits cry
ing for his bottle, believe me. Bill,
we'll have the prince of a foreman for
our mine. Quite a character, Is Don
Jnan, when you dig down into him."
"Dig far enough into that ruin and
you'll find fire crackers," Hilly admit- )
ted. "However. John, I'm afraid he
won't explode. The powder's damp.
How did yon leave Dolores?"
"Fit as a fiddle. Bill."
"How does she stack up on better
acquaintance. Johnny?"
"She's a skookum lass. She sent
her love and I promised to send you
back to her P. D. Q. So don't bother
me with talk about lier. You'll «ee
her again In a week or ten days. I
hope."
"No? Is that so. Johnny? Bully
for you. you old wampus cat. Tell
I>on Juan io steer you over to the
Globo de oro. He knows the place.
I've goi to go and hire a mule or
some oilier quadruped for Don Juan i
if were to amid a late starl In the
morning. Good night, old fellow.''
They were up at daybreak, and
with three heavily laden pack mules
In charge of two semi-naked mozos,
while tile cook Jogged wnifnSuM*
Hoinv „a ms mg spiay wt in tpe year
they sel OUI foi Hilly's concession
Cor fit• miles il.e.i followed the high- |
"ay. ami then debouched | (l i|„. south |
West along .gleet cd read Just wide
I
He the clumsy
The cniiniry
ul evidiinly giv
m i nimm
f I lie lit oils
v sell led !
slock raising,
laid descended on the val
ley hy the rinic they hail pilch. ,! ,
at the claim,
daw n I lie following
ox carts
u as spa rsc!
en over to
Darkness
They
were
up at
:. hone
inorni
and Iniiiicdi.iloly after hreakî.isi I
Wehster went to Ills duffle liag :
brought forth a di
sacks and a
a;
linl.
1-1110 .1
prospector's
Ini
lliinei
"Now then, William,
meed, "light the
i." lie
my
mi
ll
huilent mid we'll
Hell nil I inn Jp
if you've
>r
you nhoiil
in.nin
They dumber!
I 'Ip the .lump to
light steel mils
dge. On lop of the
v two
I
point where tw.
pm
jeeleil met the «
dump, lying l.esid
small, rusty, stc *1
led from the edge of tlu
mouth of i
disappeared thereii
Webster st
rails, wi
cars; the
rails
dump i
tunnel in (he hillside mid
locale
it n moment.
unking I
around him. "II.
this
"Was It grass root stun', will
cropping here at the foot of the hill?
No,
enough
lev!I \\
did you happen to
dem .led
led g ?"
lie
mil
an
if course, It wasn't. You haven't
ire on the dump. What the
ere you dm ing at ?"
1
js
"Only
mine. .lack.
small portion nr Unit dump
ml I didn't Im-nte the
ground
valley from the south, and as 1
up Ihe range. I found a buhl spot
close to the top of llic hill, and a gal
lows frame over an abandoned shaft.
Naturally, I went down ilie shaft to
see why it hud been abandoned,
tn.v surprise, 1 found a 12-l'oot vein
of free-milling ore. on a ccnuet be
tween andesite and Silurian limestone
The ledge stood striiigl»; up and down
which seemed to argue great depth."
"Somebody had found an outcrop
ping on top of that hill." Webster de
clared with conviction,
shaft on the vein to open it up and de
termine its width and direction. Ami
what did you do. Hill?"
"I got my transit and ran a line
from the shaft on the hill, following
the direction in which Ihe ledge was
running, and marked out the exact
point toward the base of the hill where
I would start my tunnel to cut tiie
ledge. To my surprise, I discovered
my predecessor had selected that
identical spot. So I verified my cal
culations and then sat down to think
It over. I remembered that frequent
and violent earthquakes occur in this
country, and it seemed to me a rea
sonable hypothesis to blame some an
cient and particularly violent seismic
disturbance.
irigitmlly.
1 came into litis
corked
To
"iiml sunk
a
whieli
hail
I'll II 11 ei I
ihe
(Conlluded next week. I
•v
,0
Ï
A
£
T
HE only sure way to have that now oar is to buy it NOW. You gain noth
ing' by wait Lug- but you may use much,
handled at this garage and place your order now.
Take
»f tin- agencies
advantage
(
We handle the following:
G. M. C. and Federal Trucks
Dodge and Buick Cars
Samson Trucks and Tractors
A
)
i
MO/T CAR/* ARE
■sw*
«
04,
~l —
GUARANTEED USED CARS
Oakland Six, 1917 Model, first class
shape.
T
Mitchell, 1920—-run less than 1000 miles
Maxwell, 1917
Dodge, 1918
Buying a used car here means values that are genuine; ears that are standard;
mechanical conditions that you can he sure of. We garante«* satisfaction on every
us«*d car sent out of this shop.
Now is the time to have your car overhauled and batteries placed in condition.
&
ACCESSORIES
OF ALL KINDS
MAIN STREET GARAGE
WALTER McADAMS
tdram nr-a/rsp
THE MAGIC. GRIP
4
i
I
Tti
1
a
Every X» ■ ws| id j ». *i" has a grip.
>t just like th-.t out* in the illustra
Mil vite
lion above.
All newspapers llavr
h "grip" on their
readers
Also a "grip" on all successful merchants
SI (VESNFLL merchants
Who realize most the value of ADVERTISING.
•ader ot a newspaper is always inter
ested because it portrays the life and notion of his
community.
because it is
the
The
r<
i
Advertise tin- tiling you have to sell.
Try a want ad.
And subscribe for this
your community.
It's part of
l»u|Htr.
It's a part of you.
$1.7)0 per year.
The Grangeville Globe
Published hv
The Globe Printing Co., Ltd.
Grangeville, Idaho

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