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The Grangeville globe. [volume] (Grangeville, Idaho) 1907-1922, March 24, 1921, Image 1

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The Grangeville Globe
Uttvt
lATlON
VOL. XIV, NO. 18
ORANGEVILLE, IDAHO COUNTY IDAHO.
THURSDAY, MARCH 24. 1921
$1.50 TIIE YEAR
FATS TRIUMPH
IN BASKET
SHOOTING
Defeated Lean Rlkg by Score
Of 7 to 6 at School
Gym Friday
WIPED OUT DEFICIT
High School Boys Relieved of
Debt by Elks and
Generous Public.
'
(By lchabod Crane of the Leans)
In the Fat and Lean Elks' basket
ball game at the high school gym Fri
day evening the disciples of Fatty
Arbuckle triumphed over the String
Bean bunch, 7 to 6.
The largest crowd in the history of '
the sport in Orangeville jammed the
gym galleries to witness the death
•truggle which reached a climax when
Tubby John Eimers of the Beef Trust
bunch fell prone on the floor In a faint
after lying down carefully and by de
grees. A veterinary who was sum
moned discovered after a hurried
amination that something about the
athlete's left leg was broken. Further
investigation proved it to tie a hose
supporter which had sustained a
pound fracture. With admirable grit !
however. Tubby insisted on remaining
In the game and refused to give
to a substitute,
the galleries. )
ex
;
oom- .
:
awav
( Loud cheers from
Chubby Fu Lia way was renter for the
Avordupois gang and ran all over the j
forest reserve in his successful efforts |
to stop the mad night of the bail. He i
wore a fetching outing shirt, with
khaki trousers to match a coat he had I
left at home.
j Midget Maugg was the life of th- j
party and flitted here and there over
the floor at will and also collided with
the wall a time or two but failed to |
make an impression thereon. His
uniform consisted of some brass but- i
tons and other garments. Midget is
a member of the Cowboy Band and all
who saw him play basketball
that he must be a whizzer on his
oornet - j
Rotund Red Harris somewhat under i
weight dashed thither and anon and
out of hounds with reckless abandon
and threw the ball in the right direc- |
tion part of the time. He wore Copen
hagen blue over flesh and carried
bunch of orchids and Lillies of the
Valley !
agree
Coach Relnemer was the star of the
Pudgy Players and contributed all the
baskets checked in the vWtors' column.
His team work was above par. He
was also in good form and employed
a deceptive dribble.
1» dribbling, however,
the bright and shining light of the
lard club. Believe us, he has a wick
ed dribble!
The yells by the Fats were also far
superior to those of the Leans and
were given with technique and shad
ing thalt bespoke an artist's interpre
tation. The Leans rallied from the
yell attack of the Fats at one time
and staged what appeared to he a
genuine come-back, but the effort feil
short on one end.
On the Clinging Vine. club. Glen
I-oomls. Gib Elmers. J. C. Safley, Don
Fyisher and Charles R. Campliell
led to the slaughter. In the last half
of the clash Charles A. Turner joined
Bhe elongated aggregation, but
pardon came too late.
When it came
Elmers was
The Cowboy Band congre- I
gated on the gym steps and hipped off !
a Jazz tune while the crowd lti the ,
galleries awaited the appearance of
the gladiators from the dressing room
^
Elks for Ote sole pun^e of wiping
out a deficit of some fflO which other- !
wise would have been borne by the
boy« of the High school bask«* ball
team. Receipts of this game were ap
were
the
Coach Jack Graham was referee and
his work was highly acceptable to :
the Fats.
•*
the Rlks turned over to the High
school fund. Another good deed to the 1
""dit of Blkdofsl
PURCHASED ALLEN BLOCK
Building Occupied by Globe Acquired
By John Cal lan.
The Allen block, which for Ute past
few years has been better known
as
the Globe building, was this week
purchased by John Callun, who will
later remove his meat market to that
location,the ileul being made direct j
with the owners at Spokane, the West-1
ern Union IAfe Insurance
f
company
Mr. Oalian went to Spokane a few
da - vs an<l returned Tuesday eve- i
nin *
:
In addition to the meat murkrt Mr.
Callau contemplates establishing
complete cold storage plant.
The change in location w ill probably
lie made some time during the next
: month. The Globe has two buildings
under t consideration and at the present
i time the management is undecided as
i u ' w * k ' h w lli 1>e a ccepted.
THE VAN DEVENTERS RETURN
Mr. and Mrs. -Frank Van Deventer
came in on last evening's train after
spending the winter at Oakley, Idaho.
Mr. Van Deventer gave out the state- '
'
ment that south Idaho seemed to lie
experiencing the financial depression
0 ue t0 fa ling prices to a greater ex
lent than was the northern part of
the state. The south is heavily in
the price of 1

' 1,1 slK-e P and
W<K>1 in sections has made con -,
(,it ^ on a ve ry stringent.
Orangeville people are pleased to
welcome Mr « ,1( 1 Mrs. Van Deventer,
!
SCHOOL HEADS
ASSEMBLE
FRIDAY
:
;
.
:
Annual Meeting Held at High
j School; Entertaining
|
i Program Provided
I
j ° f 016 80110018 of ldaho Count y wlH
i cuuvoue ,n ^ on Frida y morn
g ' Maroh 25Ui ' morlliug sessl,m
| l *'' ing heW at 016 h,gl1 8ch<>o1 uudi '
t ° rlUm alMl Ule aft6rnoon at the «> u «
i hou8e '
graui hus 1)06,1 arranged by County
Superintendent Leonard Case, as fol
ios :
-

The annual meeting of the trustees
An interesting and instructive pro
a. m. turai
j Registration, Court House..9:30 ..
i Morning Program _10:00 a.
-High School Auditorium.
Selection
|
Address_
m.
we
the
—High School Girls'
must
... Mr. C. L. Harlan, first,
1 iano Solo .. Miss Winifred Rhoades cidely
Address, "The Trustee and the which
Teacher".Mr. O. M. Elliott I
Cello Solo .. Russell N. Cunningham. East
1:30 P. M. March 25, 1921.
Afternoon program. Court
General discussions
Glee Club.
to
House, tions.
1
(a) Engaging Teachers fo- the Oom- for
ing Year. Discussions led by Miss cause
Margaret Sweet.

am
(1) Contracts is
(2) Salaries j
(3) Qualifications I al
(b) Living Conditions for Teachers J world
Discussions led by Ed. Hlles. : age
(1) Cost (Board and room)
(2) Location (Distance from
school, etc.) !
(c) The School as a community cen
ter. Discussions led by W. H. j
Hardtaty ' most
(1) Relationship of people, ! severe
trustees and tin- teacher.
(2) Community spirit
(d) Improving the school Plant
Discussions led by Mrs.
Ramsdell and W. B. Hussman.
(1) Buildings and grounds
(2) Hygiene and sanitation.
j
i in
ing
0. L. ton
mers,
the
, are
of
I Mr. and Mrs. Cy Overman were the
! victim« of a surprise party at their the
, home in the Star neighborhood last ^t
Saturday eveuing-and It was i*Wd ™
a surprise. But they were equal to of
^ ÄiirH
ored the gathering with a few piano ! to
! selections,
:
BIRTHDAY PARTY.
say
RARV PiUfign awav !
RlchHr7pH„.,a 7T WA ' „ ! SPPe
si MrR "■ M n ™°'
(lied At birth Rundiy, March 20. Re*
1 ports state Mrs. Gregg is rapidly
ratesdng.
tl«»,
aoat
HER EASTER JOY
T
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1
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U T
!
!
ll
!
1
4
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mi 4 '
Tis Easter morning, children dear.
And the good old bonny has been here
Just see what he has brought to yo'.i.
Bright colored eggs of every hue
r
THE AGRICULTURAL SITUATION
REVIEWED BY SECRETARY
OF AGRICULTURE
Henry C. Wallace of Iowa, Appointed by President Harding,
Explains Present Agricultural Situation
in Noted Address to Fanners.
By HENRY C. WALLACE,
Secretary of Agriculture
Let me speak fir* of the agricul
turai situation in general. I think if
we can get an understanding of this,
the proper work of the Department of
Agriculture will become apparent We
must approach it from two angles,
first, present conditions, which are de
cidely unusual, and second.
which may develop in the future.
I doubt whether the people of the
East realize Just what has happened
conditions
to the farmers of the producing
tions. Take the grain and livestock
1 producing country of the Central West
for example, and I speak of this be
cause it is the region with which I
seo

am most familiar and also bel a use it
is the region which give« us our great
j surplus crops. We have the finest rur
I al civilization, taken as a whole, the
J world has ever seen ; our farmers aver
: age very high in intelligence ; they
produce more per man than any other
farmers in the world; they have a
! dopted the most advanced system of
farming ever developed. Notwith
j standing all this they are now In a
most trying period and are suffering
! severe financial losses,
Farmers
j throughout the nation, especially those
i in the South and West, are expt-rl end
ing exactly the same trouble. The cot
ton farmers of the South, the rice far
mers, the cattle and sheep growers of
the far West, the fruit growers; all
, are passing through this sann- valley
of discouragement and financial stress
ricukure to,d"u ""un.b-'reta^d
the sinmti n Thev ^fnl . i u
^t thTÏSJÏL is . Z
™ W y |« *1 ^thTwTva*.^ !
of ur land, to^ie <1^ ? value I
ÄiirH
! to take
say concerning their troubles.
! Th<W ,rC CaUW * for thl8 wlde -
! SPPe " d a * r,, ' uItara l depression. One is
properly «»ter Into the ooet of produ
tl«», we find, for example than the
aoat of producing a bushel of corn in
; anj people saj : You are figur- j
uig the land ait an inflated price. You j
should not do that. The farmer did I
not pay that price for the land,
wants dividends on water."
if
Iowa, the greatest com state,
more than 90 cents. This includes the
land cost, the labor cost, and
thing else which ought to be included.
was
every
of
He j
j
lt is true that the land charge is I
considered on the basis of its value a j
ago, but it is also true that the
advance in land prices was not nearly j
as great as many people suppose. ,
They hear of the occasional sales at |
*4»H) or $600 per acre and assume that |
that représente the average. Nothing j
of the sort. The average advance of
our rich corn belt land was only about '
Ö0 per cent above pre-war values. It 1
murfc be reine mliered also that in the
principal com states over half the 1
land is farmed iiy tenants and these
year
I
it
a
of
a
tenants mostly liad to rent on a basis j
of the advanced land values. It is true j
further that if we omit tlhe
laud
charge altogether, the price which the !
fanner can get for a bushel of corn is i
still considerably lielow what It cost
him to produce it. The largest item of
cost in corn production is not land, but
labor.
of
especially to the grain
was so fortunate as to have good crops
if in- exercised ordinary intelligence
than ^ ever ^ '
at " rmlr)g
Z T™ "° t 1 pPofital,le to 016 U™*ock
! ^ ^ ^ ° WÜ |
I livestock and own grain and fed his
^ ^ * °* UVC8t0Ck '
i
The man who has been fanning his
own land and who has saved
money has prospered .The five years
prior to 1920 were profitable
his
years,
farmer who I
Those years
of
on the aver
age, lost money. When hogs were sell
ing at »20 per hundredweight every
- seemed to think the hog feeder
is was growing rich, but most of the
sz zizjz "" ln ' **
men who had to buy
the grain to feed the hog« lost
in trouble ta -this: Price« of farm pro
money.
The second cause of the farmer's
ducts have dropix-d out of all propor
tion to tin.- prie«* of other things,
well as out of proportion to Ute cost
of production.
For example, the price of corn and
as
outs on the Iowa farm today is about
l» r cent below the normal price of
UK's* 1 crops Is-fore the war. The pres
et*! price of fat hogs and
cattle is
ftsan IK) to 25 per cent above the pre-1
war normal, if we take Chicago prices
but on the farm the prices of both cat
tle and hogs are down to prewar
mal.
\
I
nor*
Now note the prices of some of the
tilings Die farmer must buy: Wages
of farm bunds are about 100
1
per cent j
above the lire war normal, railroad j
rates are from 70 to Ml per tent above '
pre war normal, such basic commod
ities as pig iron, coke, pwroleum, lum
,ber, Portland cement, are far above
the pre war normal—from iOO to 100
Htid in some cases, 200 per cent above
pre war normal. Factory wages are I
ls>th more than 10Q per cent aliove tie
pre war normal.
I
I
î
In other words while the farmer Is
I
selling the things he produces at prices
no higher, and for greut surplus crops
lower than 'the pre war normal, he
must buy practically every thing he
needs at prices from 50 to 100
I
IKM' j
cent above the pre war normal. The,
severe agricultural depression is in- ;
evitable as long as such a condition
exists and this depression will certain* I
ly Ik- communicated to industry and
j business generally
It Is a situation which should chal
lenge tii,. very best thought of the en
tire nation .If it continues the trouble
will lx- communicated to ever one. We
I
. . i
are brothers of one another. Anything
which hurts The fariniT will very soon -
1« communicated to all of our citizens | ,
I he farmers represent probably 35 or
î
( Continued on page 4.)
PROGRAM FOR
EASTER NOW
ARRANGED
!
;
I
i
'
S u
;
,
Special Easter Services at Fed
I
i
!
There will he an Easter service at |
the Federated church on Sunday morn- j
ing at 11 o'clock with a sermon and
music appropriate for the occasion. 1
j The members of the choir are. Miss- 1
j es Locke and Wynne, Mesdames W. |
I
erated Church at 11
O'Clock Sunday
W. Brown, Bert Brockman, R. F. Ful
j ton. A. Rienemer, Messrs. A. Urbahn, j
j R. Fulton, M. L. Ayers, H. Taylor,
I with Mrs. Chester Arnold, pianist, ! |i
j Russell Cunningham, violin and Mrs.
G. A. Green, director,
j
, Processional, Christ the ! Is Risen ,
| Today." ;
| Apostles' Creed. 1
j Gloria.
Ri-sponsive Reading.
' Prayer.
1 Response, "We Worship Thee, O Risen i
Christ" Petrie,
1 Anthem. "The Resurrection,
Scripture Reading.
The program follows:
Hughes
j Solo with violin obligato, "Hail Glor- in
j tous Morn,"— Giebel. Miss Belle
Wynne. Mr. Cunningham.
! Announcements. '
i Offertory, "Angels' Serenade"—Braga '
"Lift Up Your Voices"—Wilson. Mens' j
Quartett
j
Violin solo, Mr. Cunningham.
Benediction
'
„ . .
Gov. Davis Issued Proclamation; Supt.
| De " ,gn&t * 8 *** «
Complying with th
.. .
:
i Hymn ' Hail the Day That Sees Him
Chorus. "ChrWt Triumphant O'er the |
Rise."
Sermon, Rev. Randall.
Grave"—Lorenz.
I Hymn. "The Lord Is Risen Indeed" f
i
ARBOR DAY NAMED.
..snda
w. eu county
Superintendent of Schools Leonard
('use. has designated April 15th
Arbor Day for Idaho county. '
Quoting from the Governor's
i
pro- :
as
j
clamation we reud a« follows:
"The demands of our industries and
the Indifference of
our people are
rapidly reducing the forests of
nations and state
our
"Ttie forest« of Idaho are a great
source of wealOi, providing not only
the building materiail and fuel, but
sixty jier cent of »the labor employed
In the manufacturing Industries."
nt
AMATEURS TO
APPEAR ON
APRIL 1
as
•t
of
!
!
is
♦ 1
Three Act Comedy Produced
By Local Thespians at
I. O. O F. Hall
j
j
'
I
THE LUCKY SEVENTH'
Special Effects Being Created
By Artist Krakau,
Stage Manager.
Is
I
Several of the city's most talented
amateur thespians are included in the
he cast for
he three
"The Lucky Seventh,"
act comedy which is to be pro
j duced at the I. O. O F. uuditorium
on the evening of All Fool'« Day,
; Friday, April 1, for the benefit of the
Orangeville baseball club of 1821.
I
the
K Krakau has a good comedy
part in 'The Lucky Seventh," where
in he appears as "ohndlah Crane, a
and as
I piece of antique furniture,
The role Is well suited to Mr. Krakau's
particular style of character delinea
i ,i,m his many admirers mav expect to
hlm u , hlp F E Hosk . .
- Va n Austin," an attorney and he is
| , n the w , ntor of t , w . act|on of (he ,
or throughout Joe Iierrlg is "Ulehard
î Barnew." u young man who takes a
chance and provides a world of fun
In tile taking.
Genevieve Strange,
! whose talents in dramatic work are
; well known, will
appear as "Mrs.
I Mortimer < ». Shaw." and in this part
i she has a role to which she is brtng
' ing a corn-et Interpretation which as
most pleasing rendition.
Harold Harris is "Mortimer O. Shaw,"
S u character unite prominent in the
diory of the play : Miss Ed.vth Smith
; will is* seen as "Marjorie Lane," the
, girl In the story, and Zelma Lee Brown
UH " Be,ty clar i"'" a stenographer ami
I Wilbur Pettitw.ne as "Willie Weeks,"
i an office lioy. complete the cast.
The story portrayed by "The Lucky
! Seventh," is told in bright, sparkling
dialog and is enhanced by an endless
at | array of funny situations. The play
j in the hands of the local pt-ople
whom the parts have been assigned
1 should be one of the funniest in the
1 history of home talent productions in
| G range ville,
sures a
tn
Special scenic effects are being pre
j pared by Mr. Krakau,
lie stage manager for the coming pro
! |i notion. Harold Harris is directing
the play. Specialties between acts
, vllle's and those who desire to make
; an early selection are urged to do so
1 ut once. A few days prior tx> the pro
auction a committee of baseball fans
wilil canvas the business district for
sale of reserved seats and doubtless
i the eriilre list of seats remaining
who will also
will lie featured.
Reserved seats are on sale at Glan
un
sold at that time, will be disposed of
by the committee. The proceeds of
the play go to the baseball club. Those
in the cast are donating their time
and talent and everybody is urged to
' every possible encouragement,
' besides, you'll see a good show!
j
j buy tickets and give flic baseball club
An-1
FOUGHT POLICEMAN
On Monday night about eight
: o'clock Chief of Police R. B. Créa,
placed Justin McCarty under arrest
for lieing intoxicated.
| him
after warning
off the
stn-ets. Taking hold of his arm th*
several tim'-s to keep
f
IHilioeman led his prisoner to the city
jail in the rear of the I O O. F. hall,
and while holding him with hl« left
i hand hx- was attempting to unlock
the bastile when McCarty grabbed
bis right arm and a lively scrap en
sued. the policeman using his club
freely, it is alleged. Tn the melee sev
craf blows were passed and McCarty
succeeded in throwing Mr. Crea, who
It Is stated was able to extricate him
i self at least on two occasions,
: Créa was burdened with
as
Mr.
a heavy
j overcoat and was unable to secure
his weapon readily.
It is also alleired that in making
an attempt to
the gun Mc
Carty "lieat -the officer to it"
dealt him a severe Mow In the face
with the weapon and departed taking
the gun with him.
secure
and
The sheriff's office Is now working
on the rasa

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