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Idaho County free press. [volume] (Grangeville, Idaho Territory) 1886-current, May 13, 1909, Image 8

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091100/1909-05-13/ed-1/seq-8/

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Meeting of The City Dads.
The second session of the new city
council was held Monday night and
considerable business was transacted.
The improvment of the public park
was taken up and discussed.
The street commissioner was ordered
to see that the side walks of the town
be kept in repair and if the property
owners fail to do it the work will be
done by the city and charged to their
property. It is a disgrace to allow
some of the walks to be as they are.
Sometime some one will have an ac
cident on account of the bad condition
of the walks and the city will have a
big suit on hand. Property owners >
should have enough pride in their
town to keep the walks in repair but
in case they will not the city should.
This action will meet with the approv
al of all, we are sure.
I)r. Rains and the committe on
health were ordered to see that some
of the filthy places be cleaned up at
once as a starter.
Contractor Johnson was given a
portion of the street in which to
pile the building material to be
used in the Savings and Trust build
mg.
The Lyric theatre was ordern! to
line the machine room with asbestos
and provide more exits.
An ordinance regulating the speed
of autos was ordered drawn and will
be passed.
Fenn Batty asked permission to re
model his house on his lot in the east
end of town and will be allowed to if
it is possible to find some way to get
around the ordinance regarding the
fire limit. The house is off in one
corner of the lot and not dangerous to
other buildings.
There is every indication that we
have an active council who will do
things, just what Grangeville needs.
We understand a Seattle mercantile
firm has rented one of the new brick
store roems which is being built this
spring.
Mrs. G. W. Moore and children of
California are her for a visit at the
Allen home, Mrs. Moore being a sis
er of Mrs. Allen.
The ladies of the Presbyterian
church will hold a cooked food and
apron sale Saturday, May 22, at the
post office building. 50-2
Dr. Campbell, assisted by Dr.
Stockton, performed an operation on
E. B. Meek last week, raising certain
portions of the skull, which on account
of an injury once received was bearing
heavily on the brain.
L. O. L. P.
L. O. L. ft
SHIRT WAIST DAY
Wednesday, May 19th
Will be Known as Shirt Waist Day at the LEADER.
On above date you will be able to buy Shirt Waists cheaper
than you can buy the material from which they are made.
REMEMBER THE DATE
Come early for this is one sale you can not
afford to miss.
The
Price Maker
THE LEADER
The
QualityStore
L. O. L. P.
L. O. L. P
LOTS Of TROUBLE
> Ferdinand Man Pays For Whip
ping Boy
Son Savs Father Wants to Kill
Him
TWO
INDIANS GET BOOZE
Albert McGuire was the complain
ing witness in the case of State of Ida
ho vs P. A. McGuire, charged with
assault with deadly weapon. Both
parties are from the neighborhood of
Winona, the prosecuting witness
being a son of the defendant. Accord
ing to the story of the sou the old man
had come to bis place early in April
and started a row over the leasing of
some Indian land and ended it by
threatening to kill his offspring. The
young man, who is just a year or two
past his majority,told some pretty fierce
things of the defendant. The defend
ant, however, denied point blank most
of the accusations. The boy intro
duced several witnesses who corrobor
ated his testimony and the old gentle
man had but one witness. The court
discharged the defendant. Atty.
Scales appeared for the defendant and
Atty. Gilmore prosecuted.
There is going to l)e some trouble
for Chris. Waldmann, a Cottonwood
saloon keeper. Atty. Gilmore is after j
him for selling booze to some of the i
Indians who played in the Stites hall !
team here. The complaint charges
him witli selling liquor to Jesse James j
and B. Corbet. Waldmann was i
brought over and taken before the j
probate judge yesterday and plead not
guilty. He was placed under a $2001
bond which he furnished and will come !
p for trial Thursday of next week, j
There are some fine points of law apt |
to come up in this case and the out- i
come will be watched with interest. I
Charles Lewis of Ferdinand

u
was
brought before the probate judge the
first of the week and charged with
striking the son of C. M. Fagan with
a board in cruel manner. He plead
guilty and paid a fine and costs of,
- —+ -
Princess Flour is best for bread, i
37ti
$35.

cake and pastry.
CUth Miln« ftsw. I
A Wait Virginia man baa d«vi—d a
ml. herewith shown, on which the
clothesline can be gathered quickly !
and neatly, and she who presides over j
the family wash will no longer have to ■
loop the rope over thumb and elbow. |
The reel is In the form of a huge spool '
or Iron framework, with a handle in ;
r
the °P eu framework gives It a better
chance to dry than when it is folded
lu th* old way.
!/
A
WINDS BOP* NBA TI.T
the center by which It may be held
and another handle at one end by
which It may be turned. The line Is
fastened to a V shaped bend in the
hub and rolled over the reel with neat
ness and dispatch. If the line Is wet

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handed down to the State University when the Fair is over.
The Auditorium stands upon an eminence overlooking the main en-
trance to the Exposition Grounds. It is now in use as a lecture room
i by the University Law School and for all assemblys of students. It has
a seating capacity of close to S000, which can be greatly increased.
THE AUDITORIUM AT A.-Y.-P. EXPOSITION, SEATTLE.
Probably the most striking structure on the grounds of the Alaska
Yukon-Paciflc Exposition Is the Auditorium. It Is butlded of reinforced
concrete, steel and brick and le a part of the rich legacy which is to be

Wglingst Wit.
"Onr Btaboo Burgess." said a Gar
den City man. "to one of the few
American clergymen who. being grad
u tH of the famous University of Ox
fort, ara entitled to wear the Oxford
hood.
"At a certain service another bishop,
also an Oxford man, nodded toward
the officiating clergyman and whisper
ed excitedly to Bishop Burgess:
" 'Why, look! He has got an Oxford
hood on.'
" 'So he has,' aald Bishop Burgess.
" 'But be is not entitled to It He
has no Oxford degree,' exclaimed the
first bishop. 'Why. the man Is wear
ing a lie on bis back.'
" 'Hush," said Bishop Burgess.
'Don't call It a He. Call It a false
hood.'"—Cleveland Leader.
About Ivory Handled Knives.
To restore the color to Ivory bandied
knives after they have become yellow
rub them with fine emery or sandpa
per. This will restore their whit e ns—
I and will remove the stains.
THE BLACK
BAG
VVhut hapiHMicd
lo it ?
Ëjæ
i -
ÏM
-■■y. •
, ; .v .
m
i
& »
fi i
f0
y : <
'
THE FINE ARTS PALACE, A.-V.-P. EXPOSITION, SEATTLE
Into the Palace of Fine Arts there has gone as fine a coll«ti«
works of art aa has ever been shown at a world's fair, it i, J
of loan collections from Great Britain, France, Italy, Germany
Eastern states of America. Also there are valuable specimen! of,
by the leading modern artists of Japan and China, and many of th*g
notable works of their ancient artists.
So valuable Is the collection that insurance In the sum of
has been placed upon it with Lloyds.
The building Is absolutely fireproof. It Is of reinforced concr*
brick and, at the end of the Exposit.on, It will revert to the Unit«*
Washington, by which It will be used as a School of Chemistry. ■
THrcmgH Servi
To CHicago
After May 23 Northern Pacific through
service will comprise four daily trans
continental trains affording through
standard and tourist sleeping
cars witHout change to Minnea
polis, St. Paul, Chicago, St. Louis and
Kansas City.
Dining cars—a la carte—for all meals. *
Reduced round-trips to the East
May 17, June 2 and 3, July 1, 2 and 3.
Particulars upon request.
Through
Land of Foi
äciÖ
the
The Scenic
Highway
R. B. BI
Agent
Grangeville,
A. D. CHARLTON
Asst Gen. Pass. Agent
Portland.

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