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Idaho County free press. [volume] (Grangeville, Idaho Territory) 1886-current, October 17, 1918, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091100/1918-10-17/ed-1/seq-8/

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; .ID SMITH FOUND

NOT GUILTY Of
EMBEZZLEMENT
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'' ORMER DEPUTY GAME WARDEN
FREED BY JURY IN THE
DISTRICT COURT
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VIDENCE NOT SUFFICIENT
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, täte Does Not Procure Principal
Witness—Jurors Are Out Only
Five Minutes
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COURT ADJOURNS
<$>
<s>
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Because of the epidemic of ■$>
t ! lSpanish influenza, the Septem- <$>
*>« r term of tho district court >$>
i has been adjourned sine die.
il* This was deemed advisable by <$>
i 4 r> Judge Scales. v
■ '■'><$><$> <$><$>«> ■$><$>•$> <$> <s> <§> $. <$> .$> <» <$>
I ^ ru *''• (Kid) Smith was found not
i| • uilty of embezzlement by a jury in the
Y
jljM'ged to have embezzled funds bcloug
i|( Tji 1 tT to the state fish and game depart
j pent, while he was deputy state game
Ii vimlen. Tlic jury was out five minu
i* i ...

jilt, la the complaint filed agninst Smith,
i' V; he sum of $1100 was mentioned, but
he specific instance
J ■ !■
f alleged ombez
! *i lenient pertained to A. L. Clift,
j lent of the state of Washington who.
i he state asserted, had purchased from
(fulmith, while he was deputy game war-I
Jl'. len, a non-resident license, paying for
which amount, the state alleged,
'had never been turned over hV Smith

a rest
5,
Fyo the fish and ginne department.
'' At the trial, Tuesday, the state
I niable to procure the witness, Clift, and
ii ' he defense moved that, because of in -
f u Sufficient evidence, the court instruct
return a verdict of not
was
ij ' lie jury to
t
'1 accordingly.
i Smith was arrested in the fall of 1917.
The court instructed the jury
I le waived preliminary examination and
i hvas out on bond.
*'P ; F. C. Cliff, chief clerk in the fish and
1 ! came department at Boise, was present
lit the trial.
i
Judge Steele heard the case. Judge
j,,;'. Scales being disqualified.
. i The case of J. W. Hockersmith
;he Village of Cottonwood came up for
, ji rial Wendesday. On Thursday afternoon
' if ter the plaintiff had' introduced all
vs.
■ jts evidence, the defense, through Judge
Dimes F. Ailshie, made a motion for
Ion-suit.
The motion was granted.
C This was the last of the jury trials.
; Because of Spanish influenza, all other
,'ases must go over until next term.
1
BUYS PLANTATION IN TEXAS
,4 W, C. Michie and FamUy WU1 Remove
to Lone Star State.
'
C. Michie returned to Grange
Ij! ville Tuesday night from Texas, where
, , m
is prevalent throughout Texas.
- • i , . , ...
i.Vi-le was in bed two davs with the epi
! , 1
i. demie which left him in a weakened
, , ; , ,, .
"ondtion. When in Dallas. Mr. Michie
W.
ni.
1
j io purchased 100 acres of cotton land.
11 rhe land is located in Hunt county, in
Mr. Michie, who
J '''cently sold his ranch west of Grange
.J ville to Oscar Chase will, with his family
jj em °ve to Texas about November 10 .
)• '^bey formerly lived
, MTiile in the south, Afr. Michie suf
ij vered an attack of Spanish influenza,
which
i .lorth central Texas.
in Texas.
Mill
laid he was advised the platform of the
i-ailrond station was lined with coffins.
■i '
'containing bodies of persons who had
The bodies were
iJ.Hed of influenza.
''Inostly of soldiers, and were being sent
,,jj:o their homes for burial.
Mr. Michie will hold a closing out
ranch
f
ti bf town, nt which time he will sell his
■versonal property.
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»•
-LARK
M'GAFFEE ARRESTED
? ' !,
j Alleged to Have Stolen Calf Belonging
to E. S. Sweet
I*
Clark McGaffee, who resides at the
top of the Whitebird hill, has been
•; arrested,
I'j larceny.
Si
on a charge of grand
The complaining witness is E.
g. Sweet, who alleged McGaffee stole
a calf belonging to him.
able to furnish $750 bail. His pre
liminary hearing will be held, probably
w Monday.
McGaffee was
1 INFANT IS BURIED.
p Funeral for the infant daughter of
m Mrs. Walter Brockman was held Mon
41, day in Grangeville. Burial was at Cot
tonwood. E. S. Hancock had charge
* of the funeral.
. Tor Clerk, Auditor and Recorder
JEROME A. BRADBURY
in-5
❖❖•K^***********************************************
LOCAL NEWS IN BRIEF
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» «I» «Je «Je «{• «J» «J* «Je «J. «Je «Je «Je «Je «Je «Je «Je *
•* ***-;
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V'
Injures Leg — George Byers, promi
nent rancher residing north of Orange
ville, injured one of his legs last week,
while rounding up cattle. Mr. Byers
was horseback when the accident oc
curred. He was in Orangeville Satnr
day walking with the use of a crutch.
LAND FOR SALE—160 acres, close
in; nearly all plow land. Enquire Free
Press. 21-4
LAND FOR SALE—160 acres, close
in; nearly all plow laud. Enquire Free
Press.
21-4
Rape Ranch is Sold—M. L. Ayers
ports the sale this week of the Oscar
B. Rape ranch, which consists of 360
acres, located on the Whitebird road ten
miles west of Orangeville, to L. H. Lee.
O. E. Hull of Clearwater and R. Mark
ham of Mount Idaho, were in Orange
ville this week on jury duty.
Farms for sale.
re
Ayers.
Ideal stock ranch for' sale or rent on
18 -tf
Salmon river; 560 acres; 100 acres plow
land; rest pasture; well watered; $600
per year rent for one or more years or
$6500 for place. Terms given. Enquire
nt this office. 22-4
GEO. M. REED, loans money. 1-tf
Operation for Adenoids—Lvsle Bene
dict, son of Mr. and Mrs. Grant Bene
dict, underwent an operation for re
moval of adenoids last week. Dr. John
Simon treated the case. The patient is
much relieved. This condition has be
come recognized as one of the' most
common and important affections of
childhood, influencing seriously the
bodily and mental growth, distrubing
hearing and furnishing a focus for the
development of pathogenic organisas.
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PERSONAL
H+*$44++4H+'M4'H't+++*+++
Judge James F. Ailshie was here from
Coeur d'Alene this week on business.
A. Roos, Whitebird postmaster,
was a visitor in Orangeville Tuesday.
B. F. Taylor is here from his stock
ranch at Roles, transacting business.
Miss Mary McEntee has returned
from Whitebird, where she visited at
the Behean home.
Sam Jones of Whitebird is among the
men called to Grangevill© Monday to
serve on the jury.
O. G.
M.
Blakeman, Ed Wyatt and
Thomas B. Qallaway, all of Whitebird,
were in Orangeville Tuesday.
G. V. Barker, the photographer, ha s
returned from Seattle, where he spent
ten days.
Deputy Sheriff John A. Powell
re
turned Monday from five days' trip to j
Elk City, Dixie and the Ten Mile.
A. J. Maugg was called to Nezperce
Wednesday night to take charge of the
funeral of the late J. B. White.
J. f.
mon river rancher,
this week.
was in Orangeville
' . Barker, the photographer, is
back from Seattle, and is ready to care
for his trade at the Pf enfer block. 22-tf
G.
L. Gordon, well-known rancher of
t * 10 Lucile section,
this week on jury duty.
A. J. Riggins departed Inst week for
Portland, and planned to proceed to Red
Bluff, Cal., to reside with his daughter.
M . E. Rood. Republican nominee for
sheriff of Idaho county, was in Orange
ville this week in the interest of his
candidacy.
A. J. Nan. Ferdinand automobile
. , . „ , ,
dealer, was m Orangeville Satiirdav.
„„ ™ J. , . ,
He sold a car to A. T. Kendrick, a well
. ~
known rancher north of Orangeville,
was in Orangeville
J. V. Baker, mayor of Cottonwood,
and M. M. Belknap, Cottonwood bnnk
ker were in Grangeville Wednesday at
tending court.
Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Jones arrived in
Grangeville the first of the week, and
are spending several days at the Im
peia! hotel, before going to thoir ranch
at Boles.
H. F. Wilkins and family were in
Grangeville Saturday from their ranch
in the Milt Springs section. Mr. Wil
kins was a pleasant visitor to the Free
Press office.
Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Smith and chil
dren were here this week from the Ten
Mile country, where Mr. Smith is pro
minently identified with mining proper
ties.
Q. D. Stanbery, Dave Yates and
Homer Yates, all of Winona, were in
Grangeville Wednesday arranging for
a joint sale they will hold on Mr. Stan-1
bery 's ranch on October 29. They plan ■
to dispose of surplus livestock and other
property.
R. H. Parris, well-known rancher who
lives two and a half miles west of Clear
water, was a business caller in Grange
ville Saturday. Mr. Farris said cattle
are being rapidly taken from the moun
tain country, where they had been on
summer range.
Fred Bi;kiJ aud Dick Wyatt were
here from Whitebird this week, and
are to leave for California, where they
will spend the winter. Mr. Bieksel. who
has been suffeing from rheumatism, ex
pects the milder climate will prove bene
ficial to his health.
.lame
U' .Dyai, forest ranger, who
's
has spent,the summer in the Elk City;
country, with headquarters in Elk, was;
in Orangeville this w'eek on business
pertaining to the forest service. • He
had not been in Orangeville since he
went to Elk, last May.
Mrs. George Barker.
and daughter,
Mary, left Friday morning for Camp!
Lewis, Wu., where they will, spend a j
week visiting with their son and broth
er, Jesee, who left with a Idaho county |
contingent some time ago and is still
stationed at Camp Lewis. They return
ed home Tuesday evening.
T. H. Jeffries was in town Monday
ranch, six miles north of
Orangeville, and found time to call at
the Free Press office,
said his section of the country was visit
from his
Mr. Jeffries
ed by a heavy downpour of rain several j
days previous, and the ground for a
time was too wet for plowing.
Seth D. Jones of Whitebird arrived !
in Orangeville Sunday night, after ten j
lays' trip to Portland, Seattle, Spokane j
and Camp Lewis. At Camp Lewis, Mr. I
many county boys
who, he said, are eager to get across the
water to fight the Germans,
while in Lewiston, Saturday, was honor
ed by being permitted -to Tide at the
head of the Lewiston liberty loan
parade.
Mr. Jones,
Fire insurance.
18-tf
Ayers.
Oeo. M. Reed buys Mortgages. 1-tf
W. E. REED IN SPANISH WAR
Nominee For Sheriff Has Military Rec
ord to Credit.
W. E. Reed of Whitebird, who is the
Republican nominee for sheriff of Idaho
county, served in the Spanish-Araerican
war in 1898. Immediately the war
broke out, he left the Univesity of
Idaho, where he had been a student for
three years, and enlisted in the First
Idaho regiment. He saw service in the
Philippines.
Mr. Reed, who now lives in White
bird, removed to that town from the
Joseph plains, where he owns a ranch,
so that the childen might have school
advantages. He hopes to be elected
sheriff so he may reside in Orangeville,
and his children have the opportunity
of attending tho Orangeville public
22-1
schools.
ROY L. BLACK HERE.
Roy L. Black of Coeur d'Alene, Re
publican nominee for attorney genera!
of Idaho, was in Orangeville Wednes
day night conferring with local party
leaders and Republican nominees for
county office.
FORD FOR SALE—Almost
used only 90 days.
Enquire Free Press.
new;
Firs» class shape.
21 -tf
Let Reed loan your money.
1 -tf
American Watches
Arc Scarce
But we have managed
to get those reliable time
pieces by diligent search
of markets.
Better buy now, before
the price advances much
more.
DM Yob Say 'Abrnidocks''
THOMAS THOMPSON
JEWELER
Opposite Bank of Camas Prairie
Grangeville Idaho
Rubber Cement Floor Paints
MORE DURABLE THAN ANY
OTHER FOR FLOORS OR ANY
INSIDE PAINTING AND COST
LESS. CALL AND GET A TINT
CARD.
A. W. ROBINSON ô SON
One Block South of Imperial
MO. I. Ii
DIES WHILE ON
,
El
H0ME from ARMY FOR A VISIT
FORMER TEACHER HERE AN
SWERS DEATH'S CALL
OUV/UUI u/u i i ne
-
Ex-Manual Training and
Instructor Yields to Disease in
Superior, Wls.
Athletics
Theodore I. Thompson, last year
teacher of manual training and directoi
of athletics in the Orangeville public ;
schools, died last Wednesday of pneu - 1
monia, in the home of his father, at !
Superior, Wis. Word of his death was j
received in Orangeville Monday,
Mr. Thompson who was 24 years of
a K ( S "as enlisted in the students
mechanical training corps of the U. 8 .
army, and was home on a furlough, !
when he died. He had enlisted in the
training on August 15, and was
corps
home less than a week. i
Says Place Is in Army.
Declining to again sign a contract to
teach in the Orangeville public schools, |
because eh felt it his duty to enter the j
army, Mr. Thompson left Orangeville
immediately the school year closed, last !
June, for Superior, for a visit to his I
home before enlisting in the army. He '
taught in the public schools here only j
ci-.e year.
Mr. Thompson, young and aggressive
' I
was a popular member of the high I
school faculty, especially with the high
school boys, whom ho directed in all j
athletic activities.
Manual school Graduate. ,
Born in Superior, Mr. Thompson was j
and of stout Manual Training institute.
Surviving him are his father, Thomas
Thompson, and three sisters, Misses
Ragna, Thelma and Margaret Thompson,
all of Superior.
Mr. Thompson is the second member
of Orangeville 's high school faculty last
year to die since the close of the school
year. Superintendent J. J. Staley died
on August 9 at Ashland, Wis.
w
v
BRONCHIAL TROUBLE.
Mrs. A. E. Sidenberder, Rockfield,
Jnd., states: "For an attack of bron
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chial trouble which usually assails me
in the spring I find Chamberlain 's
Cough Remedy the only thing that gives
me relief. After using it far a few days
all sign of bronchial trouble disap
pears. ' '
11
(Adv.)
Jo,

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(ijj;
SHOES
ZjT&Si
>
Are Shoes Priced Too High?
j j ii
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■>
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B''"'
No! Positively—Emphatically, No!
—■ .. BECAUSE:
Shoes are made from skins of animals which
are raised for meat, for milk, or for beasts of
burden—not for their skins. These skins
available fur shoes only as animals are slaugh
tered for food. Consider the prices you pay
for meat!
brains, skill, scientific methods, and honesty
in production.
You get more for your money in shoes than
any other article of wearning apparel. Com
pare the wear and hard knocks given to shoes,
with any other article. Consider the protec
tion, the comfort and satisfaction you got
from your shoes.
Shoes are really the cheapest article in your
wardrobe, when you consider all these things.
The shoes of 25 years ago, made as they
were made then, would cost you many times
the prices of today.
Improved machinery, scientific methods and
standardization have kept prices of shoes
within reasonable bounds.
The conservation policy of manufacturers
has kept prices from going to unreasonable
heights this fall and winter.
Queen Quality shoes represent a solid stand
ard of value, nationally known.
are
Kid skins come from the four corners of the
earth. Consider ship scarcity.
Leather is not all.
of materials come from all parts of the world.
Materials are not all! Consider labor!
requires the labor of 300 people and 110
machines to produce a woman's shoe, ready
to wear. You know the scarcity of labor and
how high-priced it is.
in
Sixty five other items
it
It requires 135 separate and distinct
tions to make one shoe—270 to make a pair.
Think what it means to make a fine shoe—
a Queen Quality.
Manufacturers and merchants
opera
8
have used
This Store will Continue to
i

Give Your Money's Worth
I.
IB
J. FRANK SIMS
M
Grangeville, Idaho
• IDAHO COUNTY IS ONLY
$60,000 BEHIND IN ITS
LIBERTY BOND QUOTA <s>
<$>
$>
!<»
Idaho county lacks only from •
• $60,000 to $70,000 of its $440,000 ^
•$> quota of tho fourth Liberty loan, <$>
•S- according to figures available <$>
<$> from partial returns from the <$■
<$■ banks of Idaho county. By the <$>
• time subscriptions to the loan <$>
<$. close, Saturday night, it is be
<J> lieved the entire quota will have
<$> been reached in Idaho county.
*
<S>
<*>
RED CROSS ROOMS ARE OPEN
Influenza Closing Order Does Not Apply
to War Work.
The recent state wide closing order,
as a precaution against spread of Span
ish influenza, does not apply to war
work, according to word just received
here from Boise. Consequently, the Red
Cross rooms will be open as usual.
M'BOYLE
BUYS $500 BONDS
subscription
Inadvertently Omitted
From Last Week's List.
The Liberty loan subscription of $500
])y A p McBoyle was inadvertently
oln i^te«I from the list published in the
p ree p re8g ]agt week- Mr. and M
McBo yle each bought $500 in bonds.
j__
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FALL SUITS and OVERCOATS !
The Three Things That Distinguish our Clothes |
— ARE —
*
FASHION, FIT aud WORKMANSHIP
.
2
are p r0 ud of OUI 16001(1 and will SUStain |
it with good garments. The fall things are ready J
an( j we are having a splendid business in our t
Clothing Department. Our Stock is Complete tO- J
da y but lt 18 impossible for us to get any reorders t
on these good numbers. On the basis of honest ♦
values, our Suits and Overcoats are unequalled.
MACKINAWS of dependable values—the kind that
stands the test of the rain and snow and cold at the right
prices. _
WOOLEN SHIRTS—one of the hardest things to buy
on the market today At present we have a splendid line
of various styles at prices less than wholesale prices to
day. LAY IN YOUR SUPPLIES NOW.
The Home of Good Clothes
1
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ÆüsmsËsnxnsMSEï
******** * * * * * * * * * * * *******❖**♦$.*♦!.* 4* «M» «{»«m* ^ ^ * * * *
LTD.
Lunch Counter
HecTstofT
The Little
HAMBURGER SANDWICH
HAM SANDWICH
CHEESE SANDWICH
EGG SANDWICH
10 c
10 c
10 c
.lOc
PIE
• 10 c
COFFEE .
HOT COCOA .
FRESH MILK.
NO SERVICE LESS THAN
5c
5c
5c
6 c
The Biggest Little Store In Idaho '
DOC. DENNY
PRESENT OWNER
TWO SLIGHTLY USED
BULL TRACTORS
AND
THREE BOTTON CASE PLOWS
AT ATTRACTIVE PRICES
Write at once to
Dept. E, 328 Rookery Bldg.
Spokane, Wash.

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