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Idaho County free press. [volume] (Grangeville, Idaho Territory) 1886-current, November 07, 1918, Image 1

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Non-partisan League Decisively Beaten in Idaho Election
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IDAHO COUNTY FREE PRESS.
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A PATRIOTIC NEWSPAPER FOR PATRIOTIC AMERICANS
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VOL. 33, NO. 25
ORANGEVILLE, IDAHO, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1918
$1.50 THE YEAR
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LEAGUE CANDIDATES CRUSHED;
:
DAVIS IS ELECTED GOVERNOR
-
_ OOODING ARE m
KUOENT AND GOODING ARE IN
CLOSE RACE FOE SHORT TERM
IN THE SENATE
Republican State Ticket Is
Elected—Non-partisans Have
Little Show
Entire
Non-partisan league candidates for
jtate office in Idaho were decisively
beaten at tho general eletcion held
Tuesday, when the entire Republican
state ticket was elected. Tho Non-par
tisans, who won over old-line Demo
cratic candidates in the state-wide pri
maries in September, were successful
In no instance, except John W. Eagle
Republican, who received the Non
endorsement for state treasu
SOL,
partisan
and whom the Republicans support
[ jd at the general election.
Senator W. E. Borah* who also had
the league endorsement, was reelected
for the six-year term beginning March
4, next. He defeated Frank L. Moore,
straight Democrat, of Moscow.
Doubt remains as to whether John
F. Nugent, Democratic incumbent, or
Prank R. Gooding has been elected to
the short term senatorsrip. Late re
ports gave Nugent a lead of 446 in
85,000 votes, while 10,000 more votes
remained to be counted.
■ Burton L. French, Republican, was
■returned to congress from the First or
■northern district,, defeating L. I. Pur
' o**'. ^ ,(1Ser '
■ * 180n mi * ' re P reseHtlu g °
H 9011 ! ern 1 istru.t in congress, rt,
'
tnrned to that body. Mr. Smith, who is
i Republican, defeated C. R. Jeppeson,
Non-partisan.
I D. W. Davis, Republican ,of Ameri
«n Palls, was elected governor over
H P, Samuels of Sandpoint, by an es
timated majority of 15,000. Samuels
[was the Non-partisan candidate.
Other state officials, all Republicans,
testing 0. G. Zuck, Non-partisan. '
Secretary of state—R. O. Jones, de
rewQ are:
Lieutenant governor— C. C. Moore
Ml
mg AV. A. Fife, Non-'partisan.
State auditor— E. G. Gallett, dofeat
k V:. I*. Rice, Non-partisan. 1
State treasurer—John W. Eagleson,
m-Non-partisan, defeating E.
Kepnbl
h Parker, straight Demociat.
» 1 a»* n/n * il!> ft!
L m MIUKUAÏÎ) ANÜ UUKIPIb
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Ä IID mn I flyi
III T 1 111 I 1 lllîl
Ul IUII LVW
I Pupils of the Grangeville public
[abois who thought, because of the
order, due to Spanish influenza,
r" e 7 would escape the entire nine
pouths of school, will be disappointed,
r 01, it is planned to hold school on Sat
friuys and during the Christmas
pMj in order to make up for four
recks of school lost because of the epi
vaca
H^ The public schools will not be opened
■"eiore November 18. If conditions
■*°riiaue to improve, it is thought that
H?* Whoela can bo opened on that day.
H^ is would mean the loss of four weeks,
twenty school days, and in order to
f up tor the loss, plans already are
H*^ completed.
The schools before closing
were five
"7S ahead of schedule, because the an
teachers' institute was not held.
18 would leave the schedule only fif
days behind, if the schools are
''peiied until November 18. School
r °bably will be held on the Monday
^ Tuesday before Christmas and
1 Thursday and Friday following New
'ear's
fchoolg
on
day, which would place the
eleven days behind schedule.
day 3 in other vacations can be
«ninated, it is pointed out, and if
*** is hold
ive
on six Saturdays, tho
*chodule can be made up.
Teachers,
a»in!r
tbi
under the state law, are
-g pay during the time the schools
dosed.
A T general—Roy L. Black, de
f ea tmg B. A. Cummings, Non-partisan
1
Superintendent of public instruction —
Ethel E. Redfield, unopposed.
Inspector of mines—Robert N. Bell,
I defeating William J. J. Smith, Non par
tisan. :
Taken as a whole, the results of the ■
election are gratifying in all parts of
the state. The chief concern seemed to
be to defeat Non-partisan league can
didates, most of whom were nominated
on the Democratic ticket, when the Non
partisans boldly captured the Demo
cratic primaries.
;
j....
Loyalty was the paramount issue rais
ed by the Republicans, who spared no
■effort to expose the Non-partisan league
leaders and to show their connection
with the 1. W. W. and other socialistic
organizations.
The campaign was unique, in that the |
customary campaign speeches and poli- j
tical rallies were not held, owing to pre
valence of Spanish influenza through
put the state, and the state board of ,
health's ban on all publie gatehrings.
Newspapers were used almost exclu
sively by the candidates, and thousands
upon thousands of dollars were spent
for newspaper advertising during the
campaign.
The Republican, it is declared, owe
their election largely to Democratic
votes, which wont to the Republicans in
preference to candidates of the Non
partisan league. Many Democrats re
fused to be swung into line to vote for
the Non-partisan candidates, although
in some quarters pressure was brought
^ |j ear accomplish that end.
Senator Borah was reelected by com
bine% Republican and Non-partisan
votes. His opponent was Frank L.
Moore, a Moscow attorney, whose sup
p or j. wa8 confined almost entirely to
that of straight Democrats. While it is
possible that Moore may have received
votes of Republicans who were dissatis
fied with Borah, in view of returns from
the election it is considered doubtful
. . ....
whether he received many votes of this
J
character.
Senator Nugent and Frank R. Good
ing have been running a neck-and-neck
- ) for tho short terra senatorship, with
slightly in the lead, according
*° ' a ^ est r 0 P 0 ,t s. Gooding wa R 0 a
fight on tho Non-partisan league, which
had indorsed Nugent.
in"
Alfi Budg mp Prosed for jus
tiec of tho state supreme court. Mr.
Justice Budge al the present time is
cilitîi juaUc 6 .
--—--
KEI'TEKVILLE WOMAN IS DEAD.
Mrs. Charles Beuttner Succombs to
Spanish Influenza.
Mrs Charles Beuttner, wife of a well
known rancher residing five miles south
of Keuterville, died Monday evening
from complications following an attack
of Spanish influenza. She leaves her
husband and five children.
SCALES ELECTED JUDGE
OF THE TENTH DISTRICT
ORANGEVILLE JURIST RECEIVES
OA7ERWHELMING MAJORITY
OVER TWEEDY
|
judicial district, comprising the coun
ties of Idaho, Lewis and Nezperce, at
availab , election
was so overwhelming that hlS e " C ""
was conceded immediately a • P
cincts had reported. Judge Scales was
appointed judge of the Tenth juaic
district at the time the district was
created.
ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft ft <$> ft ft ft
ft SHEEP WITH 5 LEGS
WILL BE SOLD FOR
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<$>
RED CROSS BENEFIT ft
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<*> A sheep with five legs, the ft
ft property of C. J. Hall, Salmon ft
ft river sheepman, was on display ft
ft in Orangeville this week, and ft
ft will be shipped to Lewiston, ft
ft where it will be sold at the ft
ft Northwest Livestock show for ft
t h e benefit of the Red Cross. ft
ft * The animal is a spring lamb. ft
ft The fifth leg is attached to the ft
ft hack of the neck, and hangs ft
® over the right side of the animal, ft
^ reaching half way down from the ft
ft neck to the ground. The leg is ft
# Perfectly Germed, except that it ft
ft is shorter than the other legs, ft
ft and to it are attached two tiny ft
ft feet.
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The sheep except for the ex- ft
ft tra leg, appears to be normal. ft
ft It was on display at George ft
'•■*> Smith 'a livery stable.
<.. 4 . 4 , . . <$> <$, <» $ <s> <$> <$.
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FUNERAL FOR GROVER MYERS
_
Services Held in GrangevlUe Sunday
Afternoon.
former resident of Orangeville, who
clied last Saturday in Lewiston, as a r«
suit of Spanish influenza, were held Sun-1
Funeral services for Grover Myers,
I Jay afternoon from the Maugg parlors
; n Orangeville with burial in Prairie
1 View cemetery. The Rev. J. A. Pine,
pastor of the Christian church, offieiat
e d.
Born Nov.. 27, 1890 in Lawrence
county, Mo., Grover Myers was 27 years
| j months of age at the time of his
death. He came to Orangeville with
hi 9 parents when a few months old, and
p, a< { since been a resident of Idaho. He
was [, v p ra de a barber, and after work
i n g five or six years in local shops went
t 0 Lewiston where he followed his trade.
Both in Orangeville and Lewiston he
leaves many friends, who were deeply
grieved by his death.
Preceding Mr. Myers in death are his
father and mother, and two brothers,
George and Charles. The mother and
one brother were killed two years ago
when a vehicle in which they were rid
ing upset on the Harpster grade. His
father died a year ago.
„ .
Surviving Mr. Myers are four sisters,
6 J
Mrs. Hettie Plemon of Burbank, Wn.;
„ _ „
Mrs. Dora Ilipko of Dalles, Ore.; Mrs.
J
Alice Foster, Weiser; Mrs. Effie Bryant,
Harpster, and two brothers, William, of
Elk City, and Madison, of Orangeville.
Former Resident of Grangeville Sue
cumbs in Lewiston.
-
MRS, CLARENCE JONES DEAD
A! 3, Clarence Jones until last summer
resident of Grangeville, died last week
in Lewiston from typhoid pneumonia,
Mr. and
a year. Mr. Jones was lineman here
for the Pacific States Telephone com
'I
and was buried in Lewiston.
Mrs. Jones resided in Grangeville about
jpany. They left Grangeville when Mr.
-lones was accepted for the army, but it
s 8aid he no longer ig ^ th e service,
having been discharged. Mrs. Jones
wa s 18 years old at the time of her
death. She had relatives in Boise.
YULE GIFTS FOE THE SOLDIERS
t
November 1 Last Day For Mailing of
Presents.
November 15 is the last day for mail
of Christmas parcels to American
Gifts are to be
ing
soldiers in France,
wrapped in cartons obtainable at the
Bed Grose rooms, and are not to exceed,
including cartons, three pounds in
weight. But one carton may be sent
to each soldier in France. The local
Bed Cross will have charge of the mail
Full instructii ns on wrapping, and
ing
the like, may be obtained at Red Cross
headquarters.
GREEN STILL IN OFFICE
DR.
.
Dr. Green recently passed preliminary
, h ical e * amina tion at Moscow, for a|
V . Qn in he in f antr y. The doctor j
^ ^ flummoned t0 Fre
examination about 1
mont, Cal., for '
December i.
»
LIEUT. JOHN LONG
MEETS DEATH IN
BATTLE
SON OF COUNTY COMMISSIONER
KILLED WHILE FIGHTING
IN FRANCE
OTHER COUNTY BOVS DEAD
1
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Heavy Death Toll of Local Soldiers Re
ported—Whitebird Cottowood,
Stites Suffer
Lieut. John A. Long, son of Commis
sioner and Mrs. John D. Long of near
Orangeville, was killed is battle in
France on September-30. Word of his
death has just been received by his
[»«rents here in a telegram from the war
department at Washington.
Lieut. Long was a native of Camus j
Prairie. He was born near Orangeville
i n 1895, and was the second son of
Commissioner and Mrs. Long,
Another
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brother, Edward, also is in the army.
He had for some time been at the front,
LIEUTENANT JOHN A. LONG
but recently underwent a surgical opera
, . ,
turn for appendicitis, and when word
. . . . „ .
was last received from him he was m a
military hospital.
Becomes Second Lieutenant.
Lieutenant Long was at one time a
member of Company E, of Grangeville,
but later entered the first officers'j
training camp at the Presidio, at San
Francisco, where he won his shoulder
«traps. After being commissioned ,
Lieutenant Long was ordered to Camp
Lewis, where he officered men.
Lieutenant Long went to France last'
.summer with the Ninety-first division,
consisting of men from the northwest
gtates. It is not known how long ho
the firing line, but that
b( . d j ed facing the enemy is a foregone
conclusion.
had been on
Graduated in 1916 Class.
"He fought his way through country
school and entered Grangeville high
school in 1912," reads the sketch of
John A. Long, appearing in the Orange
ville high school annual for 1916, the
year he was graduated from the local
high school. This, his friends point out,
characteristic of the young man,
was
determined that he would win, despite
the odds which might have confronted
him.
Lieutenant Long is survived by his
parents, Commissioner and Mrs. John
D. Long, by two brothers, Edward, in
France, and Ralph, at home, and by
sister, Mrs. Herman H. Eisenhauer,
one
of Post Falls, Ida.
Friends of the family have been
legion in extending to them their sin
sympathy in the loss of thir son,
cere
who died far from home in fighting
for his country.
Cottonwood Boy Killed
Another Idaho county boy has died
for his country, while fighting in
France. He is Julius Holthaus, son of
Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Holthaus, of Cot
tonwood. He was killed in battle in
France on October 1. He was with a
contingent that left Camp Lewis, and
went to France with the Niety-first
division. Holthaus is the first Cotton
wood boy to be killed in battle.
Frank Burlinghoff.
Frank Burlinghoff, a Whitebird boy,
was killed in action in France on Octo
her 3, according to telegraphic advices
roeived Thursday from the war depart
ment by his mother, Mrs. Lily Burling
| hoff Fraser, of Whitebird.
Mr. Burlinghoff, who was 25 years of
age, left Orangeville with the selective
service contingent on July 2, last.
After a brief period of training in camp,
he went to France. He was born June
4, 1893.
Surviving Mr. Burlinghoff are his
mother, two sisters and three brothers.
He was a nephew of Mr. and Mrs.
George Poe of Orangeville.
Mr. Burlinghoff was engaged in
ranching in the Salmon river country
before he went to war.
Orner Kem Ewing.
Omer Kem Ewing, son of Mr. and
Mrs. I. Ewing, of Stites, was killed in
battle in France on October 3.
His
father, who is proprietor of tho Com
mercial hotel at Stites, has received a i
telegram from the war department an
nouncing the death of his son.
Omer Kem Ewing was 26 years old. j
He was a member of tho first selective j
service contingent to loavo Idaho :
nty. II© departed from Orangeville
on March 28 for Camp Lewis, and later
• m|
was sent into overseas service.
Surviving Mr. Ewing are his parents 1
and a number of brothers and sisters. I
He was well and favorably known in the
Stites country, when 1 ho had long re
sided.
I
Clark D. Jessup
Clark D. Jessup, a Cottonwood boy in
the army, died on November 1 of §pou
Camp
Mr. Jessup, who was 28 years of ago,
left Orangeville with the selective ser
vire contingent on October 21 to enter
training for the military service. He
wa« born in Colfax. Wn., April 3, 1892.
Surviving him are three brothers, Ed
ward L. Jessup of Cottonwood; Arthur
M. Jessup of Moscow, and Ernest hf
Jessup of Lost Creek, Wn., and two sis
ters, Mrs. A. S. Brisbie of Viola, Ida.,
Hand Mrs. Emma Eller of Favor, Alta.
The body was taken to Moscow,
where military funeral services were
Tho Rev. Dean
held at the grave.
Hamilton of the Baptist church, Moa
|"ow, preached a sermon at the grave.
Edward Steinbach.
Edward Steinbach, one of the last
Orangeville boys to join tho colors, died
early Tuesday morning of Spanish in
fluenza at Camp Rosecrans, Cal.
waB »2 years old the day before he died.
jf r . Stoinbach left Orangeville with the
selective service contingent on October
Previous to entering the military
service, he had been employed in the
Electric laundry.
He
Mr. Steinbach was born on Nov. 4,
1896 in Salisbury, Mo. He had rosid
ed in Orangeville approximately four
teen years. He attended the public
schools here.
Surviving him are his parents, Mr.
an ,i yr y8- ott SbJebacb. rf n-nn-e
v m e , and the following named brothers
and sisters; Fred, of Alberta; Emil, of
Alberta;
Grangeville; Frank, in the army in
France; Henry, of Nampa; Mrs. George
Condor, Salisbury, Mo., and Mrs. Fred
Suttercr, Salisbury, Mo.
The body is expected to arrive in
Grangeville Sunday or Monday.
eral services will be held here.
Lee, Joe and AVilliam, of
Fun
IS MARRIED.
j
Miss Alice Marlin Becomes Bride of
John C. Pratt.
Miss Allot- M. Martin and John C.
Pratt were married at noon Wednes
,]ay In the home of the bride's parents,
Mr. and Mrs. Pratt, residing a mile
and a half south of Grangeville. The
Rev. H. J. AVootl. pastor of the Fed
erated church, performed the oere
The bridegroom is a resident of
mony.
Asotin, and tho newly-married couple
will live there. The bride came to
Idaho county a few months ago with
her parents from Asotin.
SC HMADEKA-rUKTIS MARRIAGE.
Young Couple United in Matrimony
by Rev. W .N. Knox.
Miss Ivn O. Sehmadeka. daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. John W. Sehmadeka, re
siding north of Orangeville, and Riley
F. Curtis, a well-known young rancher,
' J Sunday In the home of
cents, the Rev. Sv. N.
The
'ii reside on the L. M.
ist west of town.
|, lIld an( j E jth -At. Moon of Harris
uu ,
were mai
tho bridt
Knox performing the ceremony,
young cov.
Ha rris 1
agk license.
• v-f<l has been Issued in
Lewiston t< Frank AV. Simler of Wood
A M < .,r
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ELECTED
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PETTIBONE, JONES AND SCHRO
DER CHOSEN FOR STATE
LEGISLATURE
I'H
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MRS. CONE CO. TREASURER
KUer, Campbell, Tricher, Maugg, Long,
Clark, Vincent Miss Sweet. Auger,
ILazlebaker, Successful
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*' NEW OFFICERS FOR
COUNTY CHOSEN AT
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-
ELECTION TUESDAY ft
ft
ft bone.
•1
-ft
:
-N. B. Petti- ■ft
Stata- senatoi
I
ft
f
State representatives—Seth D. ft
ft Jones and August Schroeder.
County Commissioners—John ft
ft D. Long, Eil ward Vincent and ft
ft Dale Clark.
ft
ft
•.[A
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ft
. f ^
ft
ft
Clerk, auditor and rccorde
ft Henry Teleher.
Treasurer—Mrs. Otio. L. Cone, ft
Sheriff—-W. H. Eller.
Probate Judge— W. L. Camp- ft
ft
.
ft
i ft
'il
ft
Prosecuting attorney — Bert ft
ft
ft Auger.
n
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School superintendent—Mar- ft
ft garet Sweet.
Assessor—Calvin Hazlebal.er. ft
Coroner—A. J. Maugg
ftftftftftftftftftftftftft ftftftft
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Five Democrats and nine Republi
cans were elected to office in Idaho
county at the election held Tuesday.
Returns available from thirty-six out
of forty-nine precincts in the county
show an extraordinarily light vote cast,
but tho returns are sufficient to show
who was elected and who was defeat
1 'Ml
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ed.
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Following arc the results of the elec
tion from thirty-six precincts:
U. S. senator, long term—William E.
Borah, R 1832; Frank E. Moore, D
665.
'Gi
ii! '!'
U. S. senator, short term—Frank R.
Gooding, K 1264; John F. Nugent, D
1190.
Representative in congress—Burton
L. French, K 1517; L. I. Purrell, Non-p
844.
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Governor— D. AV. Davis, R 1486; H. P.
öarauels, Non-p 98i.
Lieutenant governor— C. C. Moore,
R 1332; O. G. Zuck, Non-p 971.
Secretary of state—Robert O. Jones,
R 1326; W. A. Fife, Non-p 983.
State auditor— E. G. Gallet, R 1266;
W. P. Rice, Non-p 1173.
Attorney general—Roy L. Black, R
1273; B. A. Cummings, Non-p 1002.
Inspecter of mines— R. N. Bell, R
1271; W. J. J. Smith, Non-p 916.
State treasurer—John W. Eagleson,
E. L. Parker, D 1173.
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Judge of district court— W. N. Scales,
1793; B. F. Tweedy, 377.
County Ticket.
State senator— N. B. Pettibone, D
1251; C. M. Butler, R 1145.
State representative— 8 . D. Jones, R
1435; August Schroder, D 1247; Edwin
Nelson, R 1102; Ben Baker. Non-p, 889.
First District—Dale
Clark, B 1368; James Surridge, D 1018.
Commissioner, Second district—John
D. Long, R 1493: A. P. MeBoyle, D
882.
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Commissioner,
Commissioner, Third district—Edward
Vincent, R 1189; T. C. Lyda, D 1124.
Clerk, auditor and recorder—Henry
Teleher, R 1381; J. A. Bradbury, D
1054.
Sheriff— W. H. Eller, D 1407; W. B.
Reed, R 1105.
Treasurer—Otie L. Cone, D 1498;
Edward Blake, R 932.
Probate judge— AV. L. Campbell, D
1259; M. S. Martin, B 1058.
Superintendent of schools—Margaret
Sweet, B unopposed. Vote not tabulat

1*.
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ed.
Assessor—Calvin Hazelbaker, B un
opposed. Vote not tabulated.
Prosecuting attorney—B. Auger, R
1255; F. E. Fogg, D 1004.
Coroner—A. J. Maugg, B 1301; G. W.
Trenary, D 834.
The vote in Idaho county was ex
tremely light, being little more than
half of that cast two years ago.
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