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Idaho County free press. [volume] (Grangeville, Idaho Territory) 1886-current, November 14, 1918, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091100/1918-11-14/ed-1/seq-1/

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Germany Signs Armistice Ending Great World Struggle
IDAHO COUNTY FREE PRESS
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$1.51) THE YEAR jf
A PATRIOTIC NEWSPAPER FOR PATRIOTIC AMERICANS
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VOL- 33, NO. 26
ORANGEVILLE. IDAHO, THURSDAY. NOVEMBER U. 11)18
' 4 ,
FRONT; TEUTONS TO SURRENDER
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7
2500
WARFARE ENDS MONDAY MORN
jjfO—TERMS DICTATED BY THE
jtT.T.TED NATIONS
VICTORY FOR DEMOCRACY
America and Allies Win Colossal War
Against Autocracy—Terms to
Which Teutons Agree
The war is over.
The allies have won.
Germany has virtually surrendered.
The armistice, providing for the ces
sation of hostilities, was signed by Ger
representatives in France, Monday
man
morning at 5 o'clock, Paris time. Hos
tilities ceased the same morning at 11
o'clock, Paris time, or 3 o'clock Pacific
time.
Signing of the armistice was pro
claimed Monday by President Wilson,
who also announced its terms at a joint
session of congress.
Issued by President.
Just before he went to the capitol
the president, in a proclamation ad
dressed to his fellow countrymen, said:
"The armistice was signed this morn
ing. Everything for which America
fought has been accomplished. It will
now bo our fortunate duty to assist, by
example, by sobpr, friendly counsel and
by material aid in the establishment of
just democracy throughout the world. "j
Stripped of its malicious power, the
.,.. . ... . , .
military autocracy, its masters driven
to exile, is before the world's court for
justice, having subscribed to terms of
surrender which probably will be re-1
corded in history as the most drastic
and complete ever measured out to a
defeated foe.
Beading the full text of the terms
discloses measures the United States and
the allied governments have taken to
guarantee that Germany's acceptance
-shall not be a scrap of paper, and to in
sure the destruction of the military caste
which once could secretly and of its sin
gle choice disturb the peace of the
world.
his exchange of notes with Prince
Maximilian, thnn chancellor, adminis
tration officials declared that if his
course did not bring about what they
hoped would be more than an uncondi
tional surrender it might bring about a
revolution in Germany.
Pointing to the Hohenzollern dynasty,
Revolt Predictions Fulfilled.
When President Wilson concluded
dethroned and exiled, the people's re
volution sweeping Germany, and the
terms of the armistice, these offices felt
their predictions amply fulfilled.
Having lifted the yoke of militarist!
from the peoples of the central empires,
the allies now turn to the task of hum
anity and mercy to bind up their wounds
and feed the hungry, meanwhile seek
ing to guide them in a place in the
family of nations from which they can
take a part in assuring that another
such 1500 days of blood and horror need
never come again
Here arc the terms of the armistice
signed by Germany:
L
Military clauses on western front:
1. Cessation of operations by land
hours after the sign
fcad in the air six
wg of the armistice.
2. Immediate evacuation of invaded
countries—Belgium, France, Alsace
Uorraine, Lhxemburg—so ordered as to
i>e completed within fourteen days from
the signing of the armistice. German
troops which have not left the above
mentioned territories within the period
fixed will become prsioners of war.
eupation by the allied and United States
forces jointly will keep pace with eva
euation in these areas. All movements
of evacuation and occupation will be re
gualted in accordance with a note annex
to the stated terms.
3- Repatriation beginning at once,
&n, i to be completed within fourteen
days, of all inhabitants of the countries
*bove mentioned, including hostages and
persons unde.- trial or convicted.
4. Surrender in good condition by
Hie German armies of the following eq
uipments:
Oc
Five thousand guns (2500
heavy, field), 30,000 machine
3000 minnenworfer, 2690 airplanes fight
ers, bombers—firstly D73s and night
guns,
bombing machines). The above to be
delivered in situ to the allies and the
Lnited States troops in accordance with
the detailed conditions laid down in the
annexed note.
Evacuate Bank of Rhine.
5. Evacuation by the German armies
of the countries on the left bank of the
Rhine. These countries on the left
bank of the Rhine shall be administer
ed by the local authorities under the
control of the allied and United States
armies of occupation.
The occupation of these territories
will be determined by allied and United
States garrisons holding the principal
crossings of the Rhine, Mayenee, Cob
lenz, Cologne, together with bridgeheads
at these points in 30-kilometer radius '
on the right bank and by garrisons
similarly holding the strategic points
of the regions.
A neutral zone shall be reserved on ■
the right of the Rhine between the
stream and a line drawn parallel to it
forty kilometers to the east from the
frontier of Holland to the parallel of
Garnsheun and as far as practicable a
distance of thirty kilometers from the
east of the stream from this parallel
upon the Swiss frontier.
Evacuation by the enemy of the
Rhine lands shall be so ordered as to be
annexed,
6. la all territory eveuated by the
- r there shall be no evacuation of
completed within a further period of
eleven days, in all nineteen days after
tho signature of the armistice. "
movements of evacuation and occupation
A11
will be regulatel according to the note
enem >
inhabitants; no damage or harm shall
P° 'l 011 ** to the persons or property of
inhabitants.
kind to be committed.
No destruction of any
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Surrender Military Stores.
Military establishments of all kinds
shall bo delivered intact, as well as
military stores of food, munitions, equip
ment not removed during the periods
fixed for evacuation. Stores of food of
all kinds for civil population, cattle,
]
etc., shall be left in situ.
Industrial establishments shall not be
imparted in any way and their person
nel shall not bo moved.
means of communication of every kind.
railroads, waterways, main ijcr.ds,
bridges, telegraphs, telephones, shall in
no manner be impaired.
7. All civil and miltiary personnel
a t present employed on them shall re-,
main. Five thousand locomotives, 50,
000 wagons and 10,000 motor lorries in
good working order with all necessary
Roads and
spare parts and fittings shall be deliver- j
ed to tho associated powers within the
period fixed for the evacuation of Bel
aml Luxemburg.
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S lu,n
The railways of Alsaci Lorraine s ia
be handled over within tho same period,
together with all pro w ar personne an
material.
Further material necessary for the
working of railways in the country on .
left bank of the Rhine shall be left in
situ. All stores of coal and matena ,
the upkeep of permanent ways sag- |
nais and repair shop left entire in situ j
and kept in an efficient state by Ger -1
during the whole period of armis -1
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many
tice. All barges taken from the allies .
A note ap
shall be restored to them
pended regulates the details of these
measures. !
8 The German command shall be
responsible for revealing all mines
delay acting fuses disposed on territory |
exacuated by the German troops and |
shall assist in their discovery and des- j
truction. German command srall also |
■cal all destructive measures that may
have been taken (such as poisoning or j
polluting of springs, wells, et )
P™"''' ThfrighH/requisition shall be ,
exercised by the allies and the United
t s „ mi es in all occupied territory,
lie upkeep of the troops of occupation
to the Vineland (excluding Alsace-,
m the nui \
Lorraine) shall be charged to the Ger ,
^AiTI mmediate repatriation with- '
reciprocity, according to detailed
which shall be fixed, of all
United States prisoners of
, . e\
(Continued on page 5)
or
man
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out
conditions
allied and
"if"
Unly $600 More for
United War Chest
MONEY EN CHEST WILL CASE FOB
GREATES PAST OF THE
QUOTA.
With a quota of $10,500 for the upited
war work fund, and with $9900 in the
war chest, Idaho county has to raise
only $600 to meet its minimum allot
ment in the campaign that is being car
ried on all over the country this week, j
Since six school districts in the county ,
have made no report on the war chest
drive > aa effort WÜ1 ** P ro *
curo from these districts the deficiency
of $6uu - If 8U, ' h is impossible, the re
'«ainder will be raised by popular sub
scri P tion - The appeal is made for seven |
organisations, the Y. M. G. A, Y. W. C.
A., National Catholic War Council and
Knights of Columbus, Jewish Welfare
board, War Camp Community service,
American Library association and the
Salvation army.
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in Moscow to answer to charges of dis
loyalty, has sold his farm and on Tues
day held a public auction sale, at which
tira© ho disposed of livestock, farm ma
ehincry, and the like. It is the opinion
0 f ue igbbors that Bock is preparing to
BOCK SELLS HIS PROPERTY
Man Bound Over to U. S. Court Disposes
of Holdings.
Henry Bock; bachelor rancher resid
ing west of Grangeville, who is under j
$1000 bond to appear in the U. S. court
Miss Myrtle Rhett, Aged 18, Succumbs
leave Idaho county. When arraigned
before y. s . Commissioner Taylor
era j weobs a g 0 on a cb arge of disloyalty
sov
he waived preliminary examination.
GIRL DIES AT COTTONWOOD
to Influenza.
Miss Myrtle Rhett, 18 years old, died
morning in her home in Cotton
wood from Spanish influenza. She was
teaching school in Clearwater when
taken ill, and later was removed to her
home. Surviving her are her mother,
Mrs. Olive Rhet t and two brothers.
Chester, in the U. S. navy, and Wallace,
at home. Funeral services were held
Monday in Cottonwood, with burial in
the cemetery there. A. J. Maugg of
Grangeville was called to Cottonwood :
to assist.
!
REFUSE PAYMENT ON CHECKS
_ „ ..
Many Farmers Turn Down N n-p rti-,
sanS " ,
Camas Prairie farmers who'
' ,tn y amas aul ^
S a ' e P 08 * ' a ^ e ' ® ec 8 or or mem
'"tment'onthe^e^cks T they
° P y , „ . , , |
have been presented for payment, local
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bankers declare.
On the day after election one man was
advised by a bank that his post-dated
check had been received and ho was
asked whether it should be paid.
"No," declared the man, emphati
cally. "I am through with them.
f î
COUNTY BOARD IS IN SESSION
Meets to Canvass Returns from the
General Election.
The board of county commissioners
met in the court house Wednesday to
canvass returns of the general election,
held Tuesday of last week. All mem
bers of the board were present.
Grangeville on Monday celebrated
Germany's signing of the armistice by
a half-holiday in the afternoon Stores
were closed and business generally was
adjourned, while townspeople congregat
ed on Main street After the Cowboy
had rendered several patriotic
^ ^ at the foot
of the flag pole, a parade was formed,
and headed by the band and followed by
men, women and children in serpentine
style passed up one side of the street
. 1 * 1,1 down fhf* oth pi '. Dacor anvils wotq

NUGENT RETUiED
TO U. S. SENATE
FROM IDAHO
HAS LEAD OF 677 VOTES OVER
GOODING, ACCORDING TO
UNOFFICIAL RETURNS
EEGISEATURE IS REPUBLICAN
Non-Partisans Raise Cry of Fraud in
Canyon County—Statement by
Ex-Governor Gooding.
.lohn F. Nugent has been reelected to
the United States senate from Idaho, on
the face of virtually complete unoffi
cial returns from the state. Nugent's
lead over Frank R. Gooding is 677.
Votes tabulated give Nugent, 46,000
and Gooding 45,323. The term is for
two years.
All Republican candidates on the state
ticket maintained their loads over their
Non-partisan opponents, as reported last
week.
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The Republican party will bo in con
trol of the state legislature, when it
convenes, in January, according to re- j
ports from Boise.
show tho relative strength of the two |
Republicans Control Legislating.
Returns now in
houses as follows. Senate, Republicans,
20-, Democrats, 4; Non-partisans, 3; j
membership 41. Necessary to con
total
trol, 21. House, Republicans, 37; Demo
crats, 8; Non-partisans 4; total menl ' .
bership, 64. Necessary to control, 33.
;
Ex-Governor Gooding has issued a
statement in which he says he is glad
lie made the fight he did, even if he has
lost the election and Senator Nugent has
won, "Some one,'' he says, "had to
make the fight for Idaho, and I would
rather have made it against socialism
and I. W. W.ism and lost then not to
have made it and won, for after all a
seat in the U. S. senate is an empty
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honor compared with a place m the ,
hearts of the good people of the state.
Non-partisans Cry "Fraud." j
Non-partisan league leaders, it is said,
wi jj a ttempt to prove that failure of
80me of their ] eg i 8 i a tive candidates to
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win wag due f0 ^regularities,
According to W. G. Scholtz, league
manager, an alleged fraud which will
mean
Nonpartisan league caudidat
tor from Can y 0n CO unty, was discover
ed in one precinct at Caldwell.
that way a11 over the state >"
be declared. "They've tried to job us.
> re f; n ,]i n g ou t about these things,
apd we ' re going * haVC the " inVeSti '
gated, too. "
Returns from Canyon county show
Magee to have been defeated by J. E-1
FRANCIS GILBERT IN GOTHAM
While in
100 votes in favor of L. J. Magee,
for sena
Kerrick, Republican.
Orangeville Boy Wounded
France, Reaches New York.
Francis Gilbert, son of Mr. and Mrs.
George Gilbert of Grangeville, and who
was seriously wounded some time since,
whie fighting in France, has been in
valided home, and now is in a hospital
in New York city, according to advices
received by his mother. He is reported
to have lost one arm and to have been
shot in the leg.
The crowd, however, was not nearly
so enthusiastic in its demonstrations as
it was two weeks previous, when word
was received that Germany had ac
cepted President Wilson's peace princi
plL, recognized as the beginning of the
end. It seems that mest of the crowd's
enthusiasm was spent at that time.
Grangeville did not celebrate the pre-1
mature armistice report, circulated over |
placed in the street and powder blasts
set off.
the country Thursday of last week.
r ~~™"*'
♦ camps gained oft «•
<8>l
;
Shortly after the armistice was <$> j
signed by Germany, the local <$> j
draft board received instructions <& ]
by telegraph not to entrain the •$> j
twenty-two Idaho county men, <8>
who were to have departed from <S>
Orangeville Friday morning for ■$>
<8>
&
<*■
Camp Lewis. Movement of draft <$■
men throughout the country was <$>
cancelled.
The local board is under orders <>•
to continue classification of re- <ä>
gistrants as usual. Training of <$>
men in cantonments is continu- <ï>
ing. <»
<$•
<S>
<$>
The local boards throughout ■$>
the country, it is said, will be <&
<j> used to find jobs for soldiers <i>
<è>
<§■ who return.
<î> <Ü> <$■ <$> <$> <i> <i> •$■ <?■<$■ <?> <S> <S> ■$>
SON OE GRANGEVILLE MAN
MEETS DEATH IN BATTLE
JOHN JORDAN IS KILLED IN
FRANCE—HALF BROTHER TO
MRS. ERSEHNE
Thomas Jordan, a resident of Grange-1
ville, and a half brother of Mrs. Fred
Erskine, also of Grangeville, was killed j
in action in France ou September 28, j
according to telegraphic advices just
received by his father from the war (lo
John Jordan, 28 years old, son of
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partment.
The young man, who enlisted from
Nebraska, went to France during the
ear i y summer,
Grangeville.
Ho had never visited
Another sou of Mr. Jordan, Marion
He was cap
Jordan; ha«"been a prisoner in Germany
for more than two years.
tuml w hil<- fighting with the Cana
diaim
__
Funeral Services Held In Open Air at
Residence.
S0I/r iVIAN IS "FLU" VICTIM
_
A victim of pneumonia, following an
attack of Spanish influenza, Mrs. Clara
^ wtf<# of william j. Soit
ma|l) of the firm of Richards & Soltman,
died in the family home in Orangeville
g aturda y evening,
Mrs. Soltman, nee Clara Anna Knorr,
Oct. 19, 1893 in Idaho
f ow
was born on
county, and with exception of a
m()n ths spent in Spokane, had resided all
bpr j;f e j n and near Orangeville. She
o„ March 19, 1916 she was married to
William J. Soltman. In addition to her
|, erpav cd husband she leaves two chil
dron> Donald Jack, aged 20 months and
Chrifltine C,ara ' a ^ ed 5 mo,,th8 ' her aRed
grandfather, D. A. Boreherding, her
f a t her> 0< B . Knorr, three brothers, Ben
Knorr of Denver, Colo., Edward Knorr,
Spring Camp, and Walter, in the U. S.
service, asd five sisters, Mrs. J. M. Mad
Joy, Grangeville; Mrs. L. G. Balzer,
j Spokane; and Misses Minnie, Dora and
j 0 ; npd the Lutheran church at the age
of 14, and remained a consistent mem
her of that church until her death.
Christia, at home in Grangeville.
Funeral services were conducted in
the yard at the home Monday after
noon. The Rev. H. J. Wood officiât
ing and tho Federated church choir sang!
by request "Looking This Way,"
"Safe in the Arms of Jesus," and "It,
' Interment
Is Well With My Soul,
was in Prairie A iew cemetery. A. J.
' Maugg conducted the funeral.
i LUCILE BRIDGE GOES DOWN
Structure Across Salmon Breaks Under
Heavy Load of Oatti®.
The Lucile bridge was completed about
river at Lucile broke Monday, un
mon
der a heavy load of cattle, the property
of Gill Bros., which was being driven
across the bridge. The cattle were
plunged into the Salmon nver and a
number of them were so badly injured
that it was necessary to kill them. A
heavy wind was blowing at the time,
and it is said the bridge was swinging
when tho cattle were driven on the
structure.
The Lucile birde was completed about
* ar ago. and was built by money
subscribed by persons residing in that
court,y, supplemented by county aid.
It is estimated the cost of repairing
the bridge will be between $1000 and
$1500.
EDW. STEINBACH
IS LAID AWAY
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ORANGEVILLE SOLDIER WHO
DIED FROM SPANISH IN
FLUENZA BURIED.
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SERVICES AT THE GRAVE
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Rev. Pr. Phelan Delivers Funeral Ser
mon In Prairie View
Cemetery.
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A military funeral was held in
1 Grange ville Wednesday afternoon foi
Edward Steinbach, Orangeville soldier
who riled on November 5, from Spaniel
influenza, at Camp Kosocrans, Cal. Th»
body arrived in Orangeville Tuesday
!s<
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evening.
The funeral procession, headed by th,
Orangeville Cowboy band, which playec
a funeral march, left the Maugg parlori
and passed through Main street to Prai
view cemetery. The sodier's cof i
tin wa8 draped by a large Americai
fla g While the procession passed, ant
llnt jj burial was completed, the munici
[)a i fi a g was f| own ft t half mast,
Sermon by Fr. Phelan,
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rie
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At tho grave, tho Rev. Fr. Phelai
delivered a funeral sermon eulogizinj i ■
the soldier boy who had succumb««
while in the service of his country L;
Father Phelan spoke in part os follow:; ,
"Cbislpd in the monuments of undy i "
m;lr i,l,. stand the names of thosi ; ji
who hay© carved their way to renown jj
'pj,-, ( | 0 eds and achievements fill ui
witt , prid „ and patriotism,
Living, the?.
led lives of heroism, and dying they be,.,
queathed a legacy of virture and self 1
Among such names 1 migh ■
choose Joan of Arc, called to lead th'
forces of her country; or Wolfe, dyin^.li
on the Plains of Abraham, casting
sacrifice.
:i!
dying glance upon the triumphant arm ,
of his troops, or Washington crossin; ;..
the Delaware, amid the ice and slee
and snows of winter,
"Certainly these are fitting theme
for the speaker. The personages ar ;
sublime, the background magnifieen'|l|
and their actions doul-thrilling. But, V;'
individus ' >*!■
instead of taking these
names, patriotic as they are, we vm
. ..
turn our thoughts this evening to anotl .,1
er young man, just ns jiatr otu o j
soldier boy from Grangeville, who wer .
forth et the bugle call, io take up th
mant! ? and fight that we may live.
He's One of Our Own
I
,
fore us
in the glory of manhood '
j ?
Who is this young man that lies b
cut off in tho flower of lif '
yiy friend !
He bel mgs
one of our own.
e is
Idaho, an 1 Idaho is proul of him toda •
You knew him better than 1 lid, ai
all bear testimony that his li
we can
ami his character have been an op< 1
Imok. He who runs may reau.
"Inspired by the spirit of patriot« ,
that has filled the breasts of thousan^ ;
of others, and with feelings of loyal ]i
and devotion to his country and its fin 1
■Hing up in his manly soul, he heed> ;
the call to arms and when the
he did not falter, but left home a.
j mother and loved ones to go «JP»
the sword and defend he.r redeemu
»tn r in 01d °l° r y 8 f,e l d of b ue
• He knew that by that sword a
about to be opened up in o ;
new book wou 1
« .
n(
era was
country's history a
be written and published.
I .
soon
(Continued on page 8)
KOOSKIA BOV IS KILLED
j
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; ENGLISH MEETS DEATH 3
( ACCIDENTAL EXPLOSION
i QF G reNADE.
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j killed *n Fk c occidental exu i
i m September G
, Aor i in a hand grenade . whxdi hej
; holding in >8 „ramrcville early '
Earl English t S Y
the summer for Camp Lew ' s -
er in Keosk.a has of
death by the war department.
h
V
, <
■c
I
Earl English, a Kooskia boy, has be Jc
He met his death 1» *

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