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Idaho County free press. [volume] (Grangeville, Idaho Territory) 1886-current, November 21, 1918, Image 1

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Idaho County Official Vote by Precincts
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IDAHO COUNTY FREE PRESS

DEVOTED TO THE BEST INTERESTS OF ORANGEVILLE AND IDAHO COUNTY
VOL. 33, NO. 27
GRANGEVILLE, IDAHO, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 21, l')18
$1.50 THE YEAR
noN'T WANT CONVENTION TO RE
VISE CONSTITUTION OF THE
STATE OF IDAHO.
HEW JUSTICES OF THEPEACE
Constable Also Are Elected in Voting
Precincts of Idaho
County.
I Idaho county voters at the general
lelcction, November 5, opposed proposed
■amendments to the state constitution,
I except in the ease of the proposed
■ amendment to abolish the office of state
I superintendent of public instruction,
I which they favored by a majority of 34
I rates.
I Returns from -the entire state on the
I constitutional amendment proposals are
I not eomplete, but indication? ar e that
I all have been rejected. The voters, in
I their determination that nothing should
I he done to change the state constitution
■ at the present time, evidently felt that
I all other amendments should be rejected,
I and voted accordingly, f The office of
I state superintendent of public instruc
■ tion is deemed superfluous under the
I present educational system in Idaho,
land the present superintendent, who was
Ire-elected urged, previous to the elec
I tion, that the office be abolished.
I In Idaho county the vote on consti
Itutional amendments was as foliowâ:
I No. 1. Shall there be a convention
to revise or amend the constitutionf
Yes, 40ti. No, 1006.
No. 2. Shall the constitution bo so
I amended as to permit counties and
municipalities to become stockholders in
ami give financial all to fair associa
■ ai- ,.t orgnized for pecuniary prof;*' 1 '
Yes, 415. No, 949.
No. 3. Shall Section 1, Arteile 4, of
the constitution be amended to abolish
th" office of state superintendent of
public instruction 1 ? Yes, 704. No, 730.
No. 4. Shall the constitution be
«mended to limit the bonded indebted
n(ls s of the state, exclusive of the debt
of the territory to date of its admission
as 11 state, and exclusive of debts and
^■liabilities incurred subsequent to Jan.
1,1911, for the purpose of construction
and furnishing the state capitol to "
not greater than 1 percent upon
the assessed value of the taxable pro
perty ,,f the state. Yes, 506. No, 733.
No. 5. Shall Section 4, Article 11 of
the constitution be amended to provide
^t cooperative associations shall not
1 * governed by the provisions of saiil
lotion relating to the manner of vot
ln S f nr directors or managers of incor
porated cnipanies? Yes, 335. No. 802.
Fhc voters defeated an amendment
the state supremo court declared
■the week before election covered a point
already authorized under the state laws
"*be amendment which would allow
tonn ^ es nnd municipalities to givç
^"oncial aid to fair associations. A
***• on this point was decided by the
'onrt m favor of the view that the
* Ws xlready allow counties and cities
** give such aid to fairs and industrial
**ldbitions.
Justipq of the peace and constables
elected for the various precincts of
county are as follows, the name
preeinct appearing first, justice
peace secondly and constable
liiah
»f the
the
thirdly ;
Border, R.
Connell.
J. McConnell, R. J. Mc
I' K Rntte, Scott Gharretts, Major T.
Gharretts, Major
F»rria.
Clearwater, K. F. McKenzie, George
"»hold.
Cottonwood, B. L. Hussman, John
J "ke, constables; Ed Malerich.
«aver, H. J. Kressly, A. B. Clayton.
0, vpy, J. L. Bishop (elected by lot).
■ A. Kincaid (elected by Jot.)
!Xi ' > ' H - Hazlitt, Oscar Bakin.
■' ' ity, William Schlotterback, J.
A - Mitchell.
Faini PWt O. B. Hazelbaker.
p an, J. H. Von Bargen, E. L. Dufcr.
Cf'Hnand, W. E. Swatman, L. M.
«err.
s , John Oelbach. Ed Eicke (elect
Pork
by l 0 t.)
(Continued 6)
!
I* i
<*> SUBSTITUTE IS NOT
LONGER REQUIRED
WITH WHEAT FLOUR •
<$>
Use of substitutes with wheat
four :s no longer required, it i
announed by Victor Peterson,
county food administrator. The <s>
80-2U
•î>
IS
rule,
<*>
requiring twenty <$>
parts substitute to eighty parte ■$>
wheat flour, the last substitute <$•
rule to be in force, has been
cinded by the food administra
tion, due to availabilty of Aus- <$>
tralian and Indian wheat
res- >$■
<S>
<8>
sup- <8>
^ plies. Economy and elimination 'i>
<S> of waste in use of wheat flour,
however, must be practiced.
♦ Jf <$ v.

<^>
BIDS FOR NORTH AND
SOUTH ROAD REJECTED
PROPOSALS FOR HIGHWAY CON
STRUCTION ARE AGAIN
TURNED DOWN.
Bids for construction of the portion
of the proposed North and South high
way between Orangeville and White
bird have again been turned down by
the state highway commission. The bids
were received last week. All bids ae
cording to advises from Boise, were too
high.
The commission has called for new
bids, to be considered on November 21,
when, it is hoped, satisfactory proposals
will be received.
It is pointed out now, that the war
has ended, and materials and labor are
not likely to be so costly as heretofore,
probably satisfactory bids will be offer
ed. The commission, it is said, desires
to get work on the highway started be
fore the close of the present year.
STOCK SHOW OPENS NOVEMBER 28
Plans Being Perfected for Exposition at
Lewiston.
Many Idaho county residents are in
terested in the forthcoming annual
Northwest Llvetsock show, which will
open in Lewiston on November 28,
Thanksgiving day, and continue until
December 4. Plans are rapidly being
perfected to make the exposition a most
creditable one. Stockmen from all parts
of the northwest are planning to attend
the exposition.
ARM OFF; MAN IS SENT HOME
Howard Rickman in Hospital in Wash
ington, D. C.
Howard Rickman, an Idaho county
, has been returned to the United
States from France, after he had lost
his left arm, as a result of wounds in
curred in battle,
tal in Washington, D. C., according to
word received by William T. Platt, his
former employer, of Boles.
said he expected to be in Idaho
ma ii
He now is in a hospi
Mr. Kick
man
county by Christmas.
MILL RUNNING NIGHT AND DAY
Flour Turned Out
Every Twenty-Four Hours.
Fifty Barrels of
The Denver flour mill is funning night
and day, grinding Camas Prairie wheat
Fifty barrels are being
into flour,
Fifty
into flour,
turned out every twenty-four hours ac
cording to H. J. Kressley, who is operat
ing the mill, and who was in Orangeville
Saturday. In addition to milling flour
for the trade, Mi. Kressley is prepared
to do a limited amount of custom work.
1 WHEN HE
Evidently feeling that the war w
r end, and that he would need
ns
about at
to look for an occupation other than sol
diering, Sam Brown, a Grangeville boy,
member of the old Company
who was a
E, and who now is in France, wrote un
date of October 20 to F. W. Miller,
dealer and proprie
der
Grangeville harness
tor of a shoe repair shop, asking for a
job when he returns from war.
Miller has just received the letter.
"This war is going to end sooner
later,'' writes Brown, "and all the boys
Mr.
or
I Pioneer Has Faith
in Mining Future
of Idaho County
LACK OF TRANSPORTATION IS
GREAT DRAWBACK ASSERTS
MICHAEL MEYER.
Explicit faith in the future of Idaho
county as a great mineral producer was
voiced by Michael Meyer, pioneer min
ing man, who was in Orangeville Tues
day from his ranch near Lucile. It was
Mr. Meyer's first visit to Orangeville in
four years,
proof on his homestead.
Twenty-five years a resident of Idaho
county, during which time he participat
ed in the greatest mining boom in cen
tral Idaho—the Buffalo Hump excite
ment—Mr. Meyer declared the time will
come when the mining districts of Idaho
county will be big and profitable pro
ducers.
Mr. Meyer was engaged in placer
mining at Florence when the hump dis
covery was made. With a companion,
he immediately departed for the hump,
but though that section of little merit,
and did not stake out a claim.
He came to make final
''If I had staked out claim in the
hump. I could have sold it shortly aftcr
ward for big money," said Mr. Meyer,
Lack of transportation is the greatest
drawback to the mining district of
Idaho county, declared Mr. Meyer. He
1 t hat he hoped the North and South
highway could soon be built, for it
would be of tremendous benefit to the
ranchers on Salmon river.
Mr. Meyer is interested in some pla
cer mining claims which he will work
during the coming winter.
Accompanying Mr. Meyer to Grange
ville were Joseph Klever and Marion
Krauer, who came as witnesess in mak
ing final proof.
j
INFLUENZA TAKES OSCAR ROOS
;
j Former Station Agent at Fenn Dies in
Lewiston, Ida.
Oscar Roor, former agent for the
Cainas Prairie railroad at Fenn, died on
November 12 from pneumonia, following
gj, an i s jj influenza. Death occurred in the
}, ome 0 f y,ia parents, Mr. and Mrs. John
Boos, in Lewiston.
Mr. Roos, who was 27 years of age,
is survived by bis widow, his parents
and several brothers and sisters. M. A.
Roos, postmaster at Whitebird, is one
of his brothers.
Mr. Ro, s has been in the employ of
the Camas Prairie railroad for four
He left Fenn ln«t summer to ac
years.
cept a position in the offices of the com
pany at Lewiston.
The funeral was held on October 14,
in Lewiston
FOUR POUNDS SUGAR MONTHLY
Increased Consumption Allowed in Pro
ducing States.
Increase of sugar allotments for
household use to four pounds monthly
per capita, beginning December 1, has
been authorized by the food administra
tion in beet sugar producing states and
in cane sugar producing territory of
Louisiana. Public eating houses in the
affected areas may increase their con
sumption to four pounds for every
ninety meals served. For the remainder
of the country the 3-pound allotment
of the country 3-pound
continues. Idaho is a beet sugar pro
ducing state, and for that reason each
in the state is entitled to four
person
pounds of sugar monthly, beginning
December 1.
RETURNS FROM WAR
will get back home to their jobs .".gain,
I thought I would investigate a little
before time and find out whether you
need any help.
' ' Ever since leaving Orangeville I
have been working on shoes and still am
at it. I should be able to hold down a
job of some kind after working for so
long. I don't feel like s arting out for
anything else until I have heard from
you. ' '
Mr. Miller said he will give Brown a
so
job.
THANKSGIVING DAY
ASKS PEOPLE TO THANK AL
MIGHTY GOD FOR BLESSINGS
OF PAST YEAR.
VICTORY FOR AMERICAN ARMS
Thursday. November 28, Set as Day of
Prayer—People Asked to
Cease Work.
President Wilson has issued a pro
i lanmtion designating Thursday, Novem
ber 28, as Thanksgiving day. The pro
clamation follows:
Th e Proclamation
By the president of the United
States of America.
A proclamation.
It has long been our custom to
turn in the autumn of the year in
praise and thanksgiving to al
mighty God for his many bless
ings and mercies to us as a nation.
This year we have special and mov
ing cause to be grateful and to re
joice. God lias in hia good pleasure
given us peace. It has not come
as a mere cessation of arms, a mere
relief from the strain and tragedy
of war. It has come as a groat
trimuph of right.
New Era Is Promised.
Complete victory has brought
us, not peace alone, but the con
fident promise of a new day as
well, in which justice shall replace
force and jealous intrigue among
the nations. Our gallant armies have
participated in a triumph which
is not marred or stained by another
purpose of selfish aggression. In a
righteous cause they have won im
mortal glory and have nobly served
their nation in serving mankind.
God has indeed been gracious.
We have cause for such rejoicing
as revives and strengthens in us all
the best traditions of our national
history'. A new day shines about
us, in which our hearts taxe new
courage and look forward with new
hope to now and greater duties.
While we render thanks for these
things, let us not forget to seek
mercy and forgiveness for all errors
of act or purpose, and pray that in
all that we do we 'shall strengthen
the ties of friendship and mutual
respect upon which we must assist
to build the new structure of poqee
and good will among the nations.
Should Thank Almighty.
Wherefore, I, Woodrow Wilson,
president of the United States of
America, do hereby designate
Thursday, the 28th day of Novem
ber nevt as a day of thanksgiving
nd prayer, and invite the people
throughout the land to cease upon
that day from their ordinary oc
cupations and in their several
homes and places of worship to ren
der tnanks to God, the ruler of
nations.
SAM M. JONES TAKES BRIDE
Salmon River Stockman and Mrs. Mar
garet Swartz Wedded.
A marriage which will call forth the
best wishes of their many friends, in
Idaho county is that of Mrs. Margaret
Swartz and Sam M. Jones, who were
wedded November 13 in Lowi ton.
The ceremony, performed by the Rev.
H. Thompson of the Methodist Episco
pal church, Lewiston, took place in the
of a number of relatives and
presence
friends of the bride and bridegroom in
the home of Mr. and Mrs. J: W. Webs
ter, at 8 o'clock in the evening.
The bride, who was reared in the Sal
mon river country, had resided in Lew
iston for three months previous to her
marriage. The bridegroom is a pro
minent stockman of the Salmon river
country. He is well known throughout
Idaho county.
Following a few days ppent in Lewis
ton, Mr. and Mrs. Jones came to Orange
ville, where they remained until early
this week, when they departed for the
bridegroom 's ranch, on the Doumecq.
MAIL PARCELS TILL NOV. 30TH
Time for Sending Christmas Gifts to
Seidig Extended.
Time for mailing Christmas parcels
to American soldiers overseas has been
extended till November 30. 'The exten
sion was due to the fact that the men
of several American divisions which
were in combat recently have only lately
been able to fill out the parcel labels
without which packages from relatives
and friends in this country will noit be
accepted by the postal authorities. The
postoffice department announces, how
ever, that to insure delivery by Christ
mas parcels should be mailed as soon as
possible.
IDAHO COUNTY CASES]IN
of
U. 8. COURT AT MOSCOW
GRAND JURY WILL MEET NOVEM
BER 30 AND THE TRIAL JURY
DECEMBER 2
The Ü. 8. district court will be eon
vonod in Moscow on Saturday, Novem
ber 30, at 10 a. m., instead of November
25, as had previously been planned, it
is announced by the clerk of the federal
The grand jury will meet on that
court.
day and the trial jury on Monday, Dec
ember 2.
Among cases from Idaho county to
come up at the next session of the fed
eral court are:
Loren Hodson, charge of seditious ut
terances, held in the county jail in
Orangeville because of inability to pro
duce bond required.
Henry Bock charged with seditious
utterances, out of jail on $1000 cash
bond.
H. W. Bigncll, Non-partisan organizer,
charged with seditious utterances, out
of jail on bond.
FORMER RESIDENT IS DEAD
Lincoln Laughlin Succumbs In Califor
nia of Tuberculosis.
Lincoln .Laughlin. a former resident
of Grangeyille, died last Saturday in
Banning, Cal., from tuberculosis. Robert
Ambler has received a telegram from
Mrs. Laughlin advising him of her hus
band's death. Mr. Laughlin, who whs
manager of the Kerr-Gifford warehouse
in Orangeville, left here about eight
years ago for California, hoping that
the change in climate would prove bene
ficial to his health. He was about 50
years of age. Mr. Laughlin was mem
ber of the local lodge of the Woodman
of the World.
FUNERAL FOR J. S. KINKA1D
Services Held Friday for Pioneer Chr's
tian Minister.
Funeral services for John S. Kinkaid,
pioneer Christian minister of Idaho
cohnty, were held Friday from the
Maugg parlors in Orangeville, the Rev.
J. A. Pine, pastor of the loco.' Ch'istiin
church officiating. Burial was in Fair
view cemetery.
The following obituary was prepare 1
by the Rev. Mr. Pine:
John 8. Kinkaid was born near In
dianapolis, Ind., Sept. 9, 1832.
he went lo Cass county Mo., where dur
ing the same year he was married to
Miss Caroline Frazier. During the Civil
war the couple moved to Kansas. In
1883 they with some friends crossed the
plains in a wagon, settling in the Fair
negihborhood, in Idaho county, in
August of the same year.
Brother Kinkaid accepted Christ at
Buffalo, Kas., under the rainistery of
John Randall.
superintendent-Oi. the Sunday school for
a number of years in thrt state. A Sun
day school was soon started in Idaho
under hi« leadership, one of the first in
Idaho county.
Shortly after this time, Brother Kin
kaid began his ministry as the pioneer
Christian preacher of central Idaho, at
the earnest solicitation of his friend,
Eoyd Teeters, who crossed the plains
with him. The warm-1.carted zeal, his
transparent honesty of purpose, his
purity of speech and life, his simple
trusting faith in Chris*- his kindly spirit
and loving goodwill made him a ben
ediction to the pioneer community. On
the back of ''Old Kate," his faithful
saddle horse, he kept his appointments,
often riding in inclement weather and
ill health ever long and tedious moun
tain roads preaching the gospel "as best
(Conti"- d r-"« 5)
In 1858,
view
He was a successful
RAISE INFLUENZA
to
be
as
PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SCHOOLS
OF STATE WILL RESUME
NEXT MONDAY
LOCAL OFFICIALS MAY ACT
In Sections of Idaho Where Epidemic Is
Not Checked, Closing Order May
Be Continued.
LIFT QUARANTINE.
The quarantine to prevent spread of
influenza will bo lifted in Idaho county
Sunday, in accordance with the ruling
by the state board of health.
Dr. O. 8. Stockton, county health of
ficer, today' issued the following state
ment:
''The intensity of the influenza epi
demic has subsided sufficiently that
ordinary business can be resumed."
Public schools throughout the county
except in Orangeville, will resume Mon
day, according to information available
today from the office fo the county
superintendent of schools. The Orange
ville schools will open on Monday, Dec
ember 2. The delay in opening the
shools here is due to the fact that many
of the jiupils have suffered from in
fluenza and have not entirely recovered
their strength. Inasmuch ns the Thanks
giving holiday comes next week, only
four days would be available for school.
The state-wide closing order, which
has been in effect in Idaho for more
! than a month, to prevent spread of
Spanish influenza, will be lifted next
Sunday, according to information ob
tained from the state board of health.
Churches and theaters will resume on
Sunday, while public schools will open
on Monday. The order lifting the ban
was issued on the strength of reports
that the epidemic is on the wane.
In localities where loeal conditions
preclude the permitting of public as
semblages, local health officials are au
thorized by the state board of health to
continue the quarantine locally.
Public assemblages have been pro
hibited in the state since October 10,
and public and private schools have
been closed since October 21..
CANFIELD-HIBBS NUPTIALS
Marriage Takes Place in Horae of the
Bride's Grandparents.
Miss Maple V. Canfield of Clarkston,
Wn., and Glenn R. Hibbs, a well known
young stockman of the Snake river sec
tion of Idaho county, were married on
November 12 in the home of the bride's
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. O. F. Can
field, of Clarkston. The marriage ser
vice was pronounced by the Rev. Mr.
Vicker, pastor of the Clarkston Presby
terian church, in the presence of a few
relatives and intimate friends of the
couple.
The bride is an Idaho county girl.
She was born and reared in the Salmon
river country, but for the last year had
resided with her grandparents in Clarks
ton.
The bridegroom is a well-to-do young
Stockman, who owns a stock ranch on
Snake river. He became especially well
known during the last year by reason
of his repeated efforts to go to war, and
his subsequent rejections because of
minor physical disability.
scut with a draft contingent to
Finally he
was
Camp Lewis, but after he had been in
uniform, was disappointed there by be
ing finally rejected.
and Mrs. 1 Hibbs arrived in
Mr.
Grangeville Thursday night and remain
ed here until the end of the week, when
after receiving numerous congratula
tions, they departed for the bride
groom 's ranch, where they will reside.
NAMED TO STATE BOARD.
K. P. Nash, Boles stockman, has been
appointed a member of the State Live
stock Sanitary board by Governor Alex
ander. Mr. Nash was in Grangeville
today. He had delivered a consign
ment of beef cattle to Ferdinand, and
to Grangeville for a brief visit.
pame

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