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Idaho County free press. [volume] (Grangeville, Idaho Territory) 1886-current, November 28, 1918, Image 8

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091100/1918-11-28/ed-1/seq-8/

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LOCAL NEWS IN BRIEF
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( Catholic Servlres—Services will be
t'l'f i,; 1 * 1 i8 tho Catholic church in Orange
1 ' die next Sunday morning at 10:30.
Denver
27-tf
4
:
$
Wc
will do custom roiling,
four Mills, Fonn, Ida.
Ml 1
Gives to Red Cross—The Red Cross
i nounces the receipt cf a donation of
! ^ 0 from George S. Downer.
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Remove to Kooskla—W. E. Reed and
mily have removed from Whitebird
Kooskia and will reside in that town
' 1 least during the school year.

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. 1 j *j federated Services—Regular services
j 1 e resumed at the Federated church
Sunday. Sunday school at 10 a.
l> 1 chin g at 11 a. m., young people's
> » ■ ceting at 6:43 p. in., and preaching at
». •
Red Cross Notes- -The Red Cross
1; onis »-ill be open for' work on refugee
f*!
' .rments on Thursday, Friday and Sai
. , y day, December 5, 6 and 7. The gauze
t' 1 ''ipartment will be open Tuesday, Do-
aber 3 and Thursday, Dcieml/e' C
1 ■ ork in this department will be con
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lued until further notice.
1
Aid Society Bazar—The Ladies' Aid
ciety of tho Federated church will
'j.ld their annual bazar Saturday, Dec
Liber 7, beginning at 10 o'clock. All
1 ose having work out are requested to
: ' •
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■I nd it to Mrs. A. 8. Wright by Tues
December 3. Also all donations
<
.
<
*1-,q';*. : jtj'ill be announced later.
M } At the Christian Church—It has been
I 1 jLci.led that regular services should be
!,' 1 < sumed at the Christian church next
f.t e to be in by that time.
i
Tho place
,■ * .' inday. Bible school at 10 a. m.; holv
< itymmunion at J«:30; worship and the,
fi rnion at 11 : 00 . Theme, "A Time to
Christian Endeavor meeting
' I ce at 7:30 p. in. The topic will be:
. Weighed in God's Balance».'' A cor
'il[(''al welcome to all.
I I
1 f ay. ' '
30 p. in.; preaching and praise ser
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PERSONAL
w
fi
J. B. Loepor of Stites was a business
i : jyWtor in Orangeville Tuesday.

F. H. Rehberg, Kumiah attorney, was
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Orangeville Tuesday.
I
I Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Felt of Nezpei
ore in Orangev ille Friday.
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y Mrs. W. S. Brockum and son have
cine to Lewiston to spend tho winter
f F. H. Bentley of Whitebird
was in i
j rangeville tho latter part of last week.
Eli Taylor of Mount Idaho was a visi
(r in Orangeville Saturday and was a
• leasnt caller t the Free Press office.
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Father Phelan was in Whitebird Sun
[' ly and Monday, and hold services there
' ,ith days.
y I Carl Carlton, proprietor of the Smoke
ï; ouse > has recovered from an attack
? influenza, and is again at work.
jj 1 H. E. Roue
ibl north of Penn,
, fy Monday, and found time to
prominent rancher resid
was a visitor in the
pay n
1 casant caller at the Free Free office.
, Victor Peterson returned Friday night
0,11 Boise, where be attended n meet
t, g of county food administrators of the
•itc.
O. D. Hamlin, Cottonwood dray
in Orangeville Saturday.' Mr.
M.'amlin and family had just
'urn siege of Spanish influenza.
man,
!■ as
reeo\ ered
-, i Louis Howard, a well-known resident
the Higgins section, was in Orange
v'illc Tuesday as u witness for Reuben
rott in Mr. Scott 's homestead proof.
Theodore Tollefson departed Tuesday
1 lorning for Spokane, where he will
fend several days' vacation from his
»ties as clerk of the local draft board.
John T. Kelley, who resides on the
,'outh Fork of the Clearwater, near the
.jower plant, was in Orangeville Fri
y to make final proof on his home
read.
Reuben Scott of Riggins was in
Kifrungeville Tuesday to make final proof
( n a homestead. Mr. Scott is
a well
nown stockman of the Riggins eoun'
:/y.
Walter McAdams returned Tuesday
ight from Lewiston, where he left Mrs
JcAdams in a hospital, recovering from
surgical operation which she under
tent several days previously.
George Bentz of Whitebird was in
: »rangeville Tuesday. H i said the Sal
,aon river country has been experienc
ng unusually cold weatl *r of late for
his season of the year.
W. H. Vincent was a visitor in
Jrangeville from Harpstor, Friday. Mr.
'incent brought to the Free Press of
ice a sample of mammoth Wolf River
,pplcs, which he raised on his ranch.
i Hu (A Taylor has returned to Seattle,
spending a Iirielf furlough in
'rangeville with his parents. Judge and
<îr *- R- Taylor. Hugh is enlisted in the
navy.
• Mrs. J. l>. Shinnick and children of
"ottonwood were guests of Mr. and Mrs,
• " J ' Mau *». the tetter part of the week.
V Shinnick, who is in the medical
■orps of the
■ J. B.
army, and is stationed at
i
Fort Riley, Ks.,
finds army life most interesting.
writes home that be
Ehrl McConnell has arrived for
Mr. and Mrs.
Karl will leave Sun
day morning, returning to the ü. S.
naval station at Seattle.
A. M. Reynolds, cashier of the White
bird State bank,
Orangeville Monday night from Lewis
ton, where he had been on several days
visit, and departed the
for his home at Whitebird.
a
visit with his parents,
Robert McConnell.
was an arrival in
same evening
Miss Faye Westenhiser, who has been
spending an enlorced vacation, due to
the infuenza closing order with her
perents, near
Orangeville,
Orangeville Saturday, and departed Sun
day morning for Westlake, where she
is teaching school.
was in
Henry Meyer of Fenn, who
was in
Orangeville Saturday, evinced much in
terest in the detailed report of the elec
tion appearing in last week 's issue of
the Free Press. Mr. Meyer said he had
preserved preceinct election returns in
Idaho county, since 1880, when only 137
votes were cast in the county.
A. Pine departed Sunday
morning for De Soto, Ju., whore she was
called by reason of the serious illness
of her mother, Mrs. Mary Randall. The
Rev. Mr. Pine on Tuesday night received
a telegram that Mrs. Randall had died.
Mrs. Pino was not scheduled to arrive at
D e Soto until Wednesday night.
Mrs. J.
Edward C. Smith, proprietor of the
Whitebird auto livery and stage barn,
was
in Orangeville Monday
Mr. Smith is greatly pleased that the
contract for the Qrangeville-Whitebird
road has been let.
development in the Salmon river coun
try, after the road is built.
evening.
He predicts much
George A. Cowgill, prominent rancher
of the Lake district, was in Orange
ville Monday. Mr. Cowgill remarked
that ho had been a subscriber to the
Free Press since the first issue, in 1K86,
and as long as he could scrape up the
necessary dollar and a half annually
would detain his
name on the mailing
list of this newspaper.
Earl Mulhall, who was in Orangeville
(Tuesday from his ranch, said his broth
er, Emmett, who is in the U. 8.
army,
was expected home to spend Thanks
giving day. Ho
not informed
whether Emmett had been discharged
from the army because of signing of the
armistice, or whether he
was
was simply
coming homo on furlough.
SCHOOLS
WILL OPEN MONDAY
Pupils of the Orangeville public schools
who have been sufferers from influenza
need have no fear that tho teachers will
drive them hard into their studies im
mediately schools open, next Monday,
for Superintendent Case has declared
that the teachers will take cognizance of
the fact that many who have suffered
from the disese will not have entirely
recovered their strength. Superinten
dent Case has issued tho following state
ment on the opening of the schools:
"The Orangeville schools will be in
u
The 'flu'
bugs either died or quit the premises,
I be building will'be regularly heated
session again on Monday, December 2.
Mr. Markham gave the building such a
stiong
lose of fumig.dion that it J
all of the flies and mice.
n
few days in advance; so there will he no
dampness.
"The pupils will be glad to get back
into the harness because they feel that
the six weeks of work which has been
missed is not finished, but only postpon
ed. If there are any students who have
not recovered, however, they will not be
expected to pull a full load for a few
days. v
"We are truly thankful that the
epidemic did not atflict Orangeville as
sorely as it did some communities. The
school officials wished to bo on the safe
side; so they kept the schools closed as
long as there was any danger. The
pupils are well protected in that the
school board can close school whenever
any disease threatens the safety of the
children."
OUR SOLDIER BOYS ARE COMING
Let's Show Them We Appreciate What
They Have Done.
When our soldiers from overseas and
in the cantonments return, do you think
joy will bo sorely disappointed if they
do not find in their homes and in the
homes of their relatives and friends a
record of service they have rendered
their country?
This appreciation of the work they
have performed can be shown by mount
ing the photographs of the boys in war
certificates and patriotic folders.
Wearing of service pins on the arri
val of those boys will make their hearts
even more glad, for thi y will know that
they hav© at no time been £ rgotten.
A full line of certificates, folders, ser
vice pins, etc., on sale at special victory
prices at
DOO DENNY S
Little Red S,jto
id DEATH MM
m IN MY
40 CASES
STATISTICS ON EPIDEMIC
IDAHO SHOW CHANGES FOE
PATIENT'S RECOVERY
IN
MANY DUE TO CARELESSNESS
Morality Rate From Epidemic Could Be
Further Reduced If All Afflicted
Took Precautions
die.
One persons in every forty who has
been stricken with Spanish influenza
in the state of Idaho has died, reports
from all parts of the state, on file in
the office of the state board of health
at Boise reveal.
In other words a
patient who has Spanish influenza, the
Idaho statistics show, has 1000 chances
to recover to twenty-five that he will
Since October 8, when the first
port was filed, 12,500 cases of infill
re
enza have been reported, of which 316
resulted fatally.
Taking 12% out of 1000
as a fair
normal tune yearly death rate, these
figures, based on a little more than one
month, show that during the presence
of the epidemic the death rate in Idaho
is doubled among persons who take ill
with it.
Death can be given a poorer showing
than even a l-to-40 chance if
who become ill with influenza take
extra precautions at the outset to fight
off the disease, it is said, as many of
the fatalities in the health board
port resulted beyond a doub{ from the
carelessness of the patient in failing to
understand the seriousness of his case
and tak p care of himself as instructed.
persons
s re
With
respect to vaccination to pre
vent influenza, the Journal of the Arne
riean Medical association
says;, "Vac
cination against epidemic influenza is
wholly experimental stage.''
in a
A FALSE BELIEF.
Many persons seem to think that
Osteopathic Physicians do not believe in
We wish to correct this ini
As a
matter af fact, Osteopathy and Surgery
more closely related than are Drugs
and Surgery.
surgery.
pression, because it is not true.
a re
In no schools is surgey more thorough
ly taught than in
school; in no branch of therapeutics
the Osteopathic
are
there more competent surgeons than
found among the members of the Osteo
pathic profession; but, notwithstanding
this fact,
takes but few cases to the surgery be
cause he is prepared to save his patient
this ordeal in most instances.
We believe that because
a re
the Osteopathic Physician
some surgeon
a cer
is bent upon specializing along
tain line of surgery and wishes to per
form as many operations in that parti
talar field as pussioie, in ordc* to per
fe;-t himself in the technic, is not a
legitimate reason for recommending an
operation in each such case with which
For example, just at the pres
ent time there seems to be a mania for
the removal of the tonsils. Many physi
cians, especially surgeons, suggest the
removal of every enlarged tonsil with
which they eome in contact. Now, we
say and have demonstrated, that about
ninety or ninety-five per cent of these
tonsils can be saved, made to perform
their normal functions without detri
ment to the patient but very much to
his advantage.
Why sacrifice any part of the human
anatomy just to satisfy the whims of
some individual who has a mania for
that kind of surgeryf
Yes, indeed, Osteopathic Physicians
remove tonsils when they find them dis
eased beyond repair and in such condi
tion as to be a manaee to body health,
not before and these eases comprise
only about five or ten per cent of the
ones which are actually being operated
upon today. So it is in other conditions
which are being operated upon daily
without reason. Do you realize that
we meet.
every city has numerous hospitals which
are crowded to capacity, and many times
overflowing, with surgical cases and
that a very large per cent of these cases
did not justify this radical treatment?
How would it be possible to estimate the
annual suffering of human beings in this
great enlightened country of ours which
is caused by needless surgery. Oan you
imagine it?
How, then, may people avoid this
situation? That is simple. When they
are in need of a physician, they should
call upon a physician and not a surgeon.
A surgeon's method of treating disease
is by surgery; quite naturally if he
treats a patient it will be by surgical
methods.
If you wish to be certain that you are
„oiug to get surgery and nothing else,
1
than consult a surgeon regarding your
aliment.
An Osteopathic Physician will recoin
•ml surgery to you if you need it,
otherwise wou will get the palliative
treatment to which you are first eu
titled and you will probably get well.
Of course, there are those persons who
to feel that they have not acquired
1 1 "
seem
all the pleasures of life until they have
aroused the sympathy of their friends
by having undergone a serious operation,
this rendering them physically unable to
perform hte menial tasks of the daily
routine. This warning is not intended
for them; may they not be disappointed.
We are speaking to those individuals
who are in close enough touch with Na
ture to love the things which Nature
created best, who wish to live for the
best that is in them and who wish to see
the life-giving blood glowing within
their cheeks that they may enjoy life
and the things that life has given them.
Osteopaths know surgery to be a won
derful and indispensable measure, but
they know it to be a court of last resort
and their motto is: "Surgery only
when surgery is indispensible. "
LIEUTENANT LONG IS KTT.LFn
(Continued from page 1)
he would never have made that state
mont unless he knew that his wound
would kill him.
"That night we fell back and did
not attack again until three days later. 1
I do not know whether or not his body }
He is either dead,

was ever found.
wounded, and a German prisoner,
hope that he has been spared, but I
firmly believe that his last word
or ,
s were
true.
"I hope you will feel free to ask
for any other information 1 may be able
to give you. It is possible that I will
be home before long. If go, I will try
and call upon you. May 1 extend t
you both a cordial invitation to stop
at our home should you ever be in St.
Maries.
"I beg to remain as ever,
"Your sincere friend,
"EVERETT E. HUNT,
"1st Lt. Inf., U. S. A."
me
ü
WHEN IT'S
NOON IT'S NOONifffc
Idaho County to Go on One Standard of
Time January 1.
Time in Idaho
county will be stan
dardized at 2 a, m. January 1,
under an order just issued by the i
terstate commerce commission at Wash
ington, defining zones of standard time
in the United States.
next,
in
Beginning with
tho first of tho next year, all clocks in
Idaho county which correctly record the
time of day will simultaneously point
to the same hour, for the zone line be
tween Mountain and Pacific time, which
heretofore has been drawn for south
Idaho at Huntington, Ore.,
moved eastward to Pocatello, thus
will be
throwing practically all of the state of
Idaho in the Pacific time zone.
The interstate commerce
recently issued an order clec.ly defining •
the zones of standard time in the United I
States. Heretofore the time zones, which !
are supposed to be segregated by
tain meridian of longitude, have been
designated chiefly at the convenience of
transcontinental railroads in the opera
tion of their trains.
The ro-the;
comm ission
etT
serve( l jointly by the Northern Pacific
and w - R - & N. railroads, has been
%
. of ibo
Ol.lli .
un d° r Pacific, tim,,
• Oi tuai is in
standard used ! ;• tho»? railroads cn th
Idaho lines.
Pacifie lines west of Paradise, Mont.,
are operated on Pacifie time, - as are all
O. W. R. & N. trains, while th e south
part of the county, which receives
its time from tho Pacific and Idaho
Northern railroad at New Meadows,
the Oregon Short line at McCall,
been in the Mountain time belt. Though
Orangeville is, generally speaking, prac
tically north of Boise, and therefore the
two cities should be in the same
of time, the truth is that when it i
12 o'clock noon in Orangeville, it is 1
in the morning in Boise,
sections of the southern part of Idaho
county which relied upon the Oregon
Short line for their time, they also,
have been an
Trains on all Norther
ii
ern
or
lias
zone
-
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So, in those
hour behind Grsngeville.
Tho new order places in the Pacific
time zone all territory in the United
States proper lying west of an imagi
nary line following the eastern bound
ary of the Blackfeet Indian reservation
in Montana and the continental divide
TAKEN UP.
to Helena, Butte, Dillion, Mont., Poca
tello and the Oregon Short line to Ogd
and Salt Lake, Utah; thence the Los
Angeles and Salt Lake railroad to tho
west and south boundaries of Utah to
the 113th meridian; thence to Seligm
and Parker, Ariz., and along the Colo
rado river to the Mexican boundary.
Changes also have been made in the
lines separting Eastern and Central time
zones and Central and Mountain zones.
■■ii
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Red cow, gentle. Branded on left hip,
but can't be distinguished. No ear mark.
Owner can have samp by proving prop
erty and paying charges. Walter O.
Altman. Phone Pacific 11x3.
28-2
Free Press prints butter
wrapper».
4» 4* 4» 4*4* 4* 4* 4* 4» 4» 4» 4* 4» 4» 4* 4* 4» 4* 4* 4»4»4» 4* 4» 4*4*4* 4*4» 4*4« 4* 4» 4* 4» 4*4»'
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The time is right here
We ere- showing the
Ai
t0 blJ y cost*,
assort
very best
ment ever brought tj Orange,P!
attractive garments are first
tical.
These
of all
.•
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prac
the fore
designers
... . nothin g lacking
nothing overdone and yet they po *
that exclusive something which is know
aa style.
That seems to have been
most thought with all patriotic
this seasou. There is
\i\
Km
:jr
ÖT Hn|
!
7
■A
ft
n
;
Buy your coat now and have the plea
sure and satisfaction 0 f it the
season.
1

entire
I■
Also a splendid line of women 's Woo]
and Silk Sweater Coats, Scarfs, Toques
Caps, Skating Sets.
'7/-N
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• •
Stocks have been chosen
. with the
most discriminating care and "Value"
is our
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supreme accomplishment through
out.
n.
Bhhmm
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LTD.
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Help Our Government
I
SHOP EARLY
BUT MORE IMPORTANT
a !/IP EAR' V
P Every Cb»->«tmas prekage shipped
now will d
prevent congestion of the transportation
Companies' and mails, delays and dis
appointments later
r:
I
SHI SEND Vour Christmas Packages NO W
p
c
And Mark TTAr m " VONT OPEN BEFORE CHRISTMAS"



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Us
UP-TO-DATE!
CHRISTMAS
Attractions
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li-V;
W hy not have the Modern Things, the New Ideas,
the Last Happy Thoughts and the Newest Novel
ties represented in your Christmas purchases this
year. We are waiting to show'
I
you our
' NT
ew Holiday Stock
It contains the Uery Best for Christmas 1918, and is ^
eas y select jiuiii because itoiieis iue i\ew i mugs
yu
and Everything to make people happy, whether they
He are young or old.
The Most Pleasing Gifts
Eg
(L 1 ^
as
and plenty of them are ready and waiting for your
inspection. Our fine assortment presents the Novel
and the Beautiful in gifts that are Useful, Practical
and Really Desirable, They meet the expectation
and gratify the taste.
Prices Are Reasonable
to
^ y °u- ^ ^king yourself where you can buy best and cheap
ârD es * "?is Xnias, you will get your answer if you look through
^ our Superior line of HOLIDAY ATTRACTIONS and con
m pare QUALITY AND PRICE with others.
Comt and See Our Fair Priced Christmas Attractions
Thomas Thompson
JEWELER
Opposite Bank of Camas Prairie
Grangeville,
Idaho
f Kamiah Marble & Granite Works
Manufacturer and Dealer in
Monumental and Cemetery Work
BEST OF MACHINER'
For Polishing, Cutting, and m *
ENGRAVING !
I ! kamiah granite
To of All Foreign
GRANITES and MARBLES
PROMPT DELIVERY TO ANY PART OF THE country
KARL C. FRANK, Prop
Kamiah,
o
. Idaho
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