OCR Interpretation


Idaho County free press. [volume] (Grangeville, Idaho Territory) 1886-current, December 12, 1918, Image 5

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091100/1918-12-12/ed-1/seq-5/

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fi IV
OF AGRICULTURE IN
secretary
STATEMENT ON RAISING OP
PRICES ON FOREST.
I
EFFECTIVE MARCH I, 1919
Advance for Time Delayed Because of
Disturbed Conditions Confront
ing Stockmen
I
WASHINGTON-—Secretary Houston,
believing that further suspension of the
increase in national forest grazing fees
first, decided on in 1916 is no longer
justified, has announced new 'rates to
go into effect -March i, 1919. Effective
at the same time, he has authorized the
granting of five-year grazing permits
where the conditions warrant and such
permits are desired by the stockmen.
"In accordance with the conslusion
; reached by me Feb. 1, 1917," Secretary
Houston has informed the stockmen
through letters to their two national as
soeiations, "that tho charge for grazing
should he based upon the real value of
the forage, I have decided that begiu
uiug March 1, 1919, the charge for graz
ing upon the national forests during
the year-long period will be from 80c to
$1.50 per head for cattle, varying with
the advantages of the different ranges.
The rate for sheep and goats on each
forest will be -i percent of the rate for
cattle. 'Çhe rate for horses will be 25
percent more than for cattle, and the
rate for swine 25 percent less. The pro
portionate charge for grazing during
only a part of each year will be in ac
e with the provisions of the
national forest regulations."
Decides Against Further Delay.
The original plan was to advance
. grazing fees 33 1-3 percent a year for
three years, beginning in 1917; but on
account of the disturbed condition^
T
which confronted the Stockmen that
year the advance made was only 23 per
cent; while a year later the emergency
situation created by tho war led Secre
tary Houston to suspend temporarily the
further carrying out of the plait,
am not unmindful of tho difficulties
"I
which still exist," he says, "but under
the circumstances it seems unwise to
further defer action on this important
problem "
Regarding the authorization of five
year permits Secretary Houston, after
noting the fact that the stockmen have
from time to time urged the issuance of
snr-li permits, not subject to reduction
except for violation of their terms or to
several ot the forests applies
tious have already been approved for
permits during a five-year period sub
ject to an annual reduction of 5 percent j
to pr.,v ido for the issuance of permits to
j
j
stop damage to the forest or range, as a
means of stahiizing the livestock Indus
try, „oes on to say:
"On
new settlers, in addition to such reduc 1 1
tion as might be necessary to prevent
damage to the forest. •
Would Stabilize Industry
"It appears that while the stockmen
are n idv to subject themselves to what
ever restrictions are necessary tor the
f timber production of Otluc t pri
welfare of the forest from the stand
point
unity purposes for which the land was
set aside, yet the possibility of the •<
I>m mt annual reduction pfovBfe an em
barrassment to them. It is appreciated
Unit tin- assurance of continued use of
the range for a specific number of anim
als liming a term of years would uu
'limit,. 11 v tend *to greater stability of
the inlustry and encourage the handling
of business in a way to increase the
•(Unntity and improve the quality of the
livestock and would also enable a bet -1
ter administration of the range itself.
"On a considerable portion of the
national forests we have reached the
point where permits for a period of
five .ears cait be put into effect with
out difficulty.
other tor
On certain
ests
wc are not in a position to grant
five
year permits for more than a por
1,0,1 1,1 Hu* stoek at present upon them,
^••'"ise there
is serious question whuth
M then* is not now mort» atoPk than «*an
he .
•arrieil permanently without injury
There is' also the extra
hi the forest.
■tock which has been taken care of as
a " ar emergency, sonic of which we
*iil not In- able to continue, ami fori
that
reason should iiot be included under |
e-vear
fix
permits.
•'he issuance of annual permits will
' 1 oiitiiim-d where reductions arc nec
#! ' ka, r to insure
'""- V ,H ' '■'■T 1 " " 1 , ,,1 ' ;, "- V
■ ISI1II. The plan is prngc-six clv j
• -
»hont a.more secure tenure or I
S
!..
again-it
i I- ing.
o verst,
tu In ;
■lie
■i ugh the i>
as fast as
-i" 1 "ng jiri', ilegi s "
mim,.,. fiv
this
vari,,-,
•nr lipnii .8
•> bo dom* in con
' M*blir intert'sts in. Ȕv d.
n of tho
;il
NO WHITEBIRD NEWS
<î>
<S>
The Free Press regrets its <S>
inability to print the customary ^
® budget of Whitebird items this <•>
^ week, owing to the fact that <S>
Miss Laura Smith, correspon- <$>
❖ dent at Whitobird, is ill with 3>
® Spanish influenza. Fifteen cases <$•
^ of influenza
^ Whitebird.
are reported in
<$>
I
J. ALEXANDER DIES
(Continued from Page One)
j about fifteen years ago, he gave dose
personal attention to all details of On
! lar s® business, but at that time adop'ted
a policy of withdrawing from the reupon
aibUities cud in line with the
purpose
he sold a few years ago his interest in
the Lewiston store of the J. Alexander
company and since had led a retired life
at his home on Prospect avenue, Lewis
ton, with his sister-in-law, the late Mrs.
-Max Alexander and her children.
Sympathetic for Unfortunate.
could not use his credit ii^ the pioneei j
days, and the statement is made that
.luring the great panic of the 90 's. al I
"Uncle .lee's" outsanding trait
his - sympathy for the unfortunate,
was indeed an unworthy person who j
was
though carrying credits running into the j
thousands of dollars, "Uncle .loe''|
never enforced a single collection dur- I
ing the period. It would seem that in
the passing of this grand old pioneer, it j
can be truthfully said, here has been j
called a man who has not a single
enemy.
FRED ROTHLISBERG LAND FOR
SALE.
200-ACRE BARGAIN, 160 acres in
cultivation, 5-room house, good barn,
other buildings, fenced and cross fenced
in four fields, HOG TIGHT, many
springs, well and creek. EASY TERMS,
10 years time.
You had better grab this. GEO. M.
REED, EXCLUSIVE AGENT, Orange
ville, Ida.
GOOD OPPORTUNITY.
30-1
MORE THAN KAISER COULD DO.
There was a man in our town,
And he was wondrous wise,
For he could reel right off the list
Of all of our allies.
#
Cartoons Magazine.
_
Free
I
wrappers
Press office.
HINTS FOR BELATED GIFTS
Bags and Aprons Are Easily and
Quickly Made and They Are Al
ways Acceptable.
j
j • For many weeks before Christmas
the household is busy with needle,
crochet hook and tatting shuttle, fash
ioning Christmas gifts for family and
friends. But, there always are some
belated gifts, that must be made dur
ing the last few days, for friends that
we would like to remember.
In such cases there is nothing more
quickly or easily made than bags and
aprons, and one never can have too
many of either. Laundry bags, stock
I Ing bags, darning bags, piece bags and
b a(?s f or so u e( j handkerchiefs can be
ma de of chintz or cretonne, and fancy
work bags, purse bags, and 'handker
chief bags may be made of silk and
ribbon. Several of these hags can eas
ily be made in an evening, and they
are always acceptable gifts,
And aprons—no woman ever had
too many aprons. A few yards of ging
ham. percale and butcher's linen made
up Into aprons, which would, not re
quire more than a day to make a good
supply, would go a long ways as gifts
to busy house mothers. And caps, also.
At this time almost every woman
wears some sort of cap when doing
her house work, and a neat, washable
cap makes an acceptable gift, and re
quires little skill in the making. And
so with these practical and quickly
made gifts one may be able to catch up
with Christmas remembrances, even
though belated until the last few days
before Christmas.
opened till Christmas,
Opening the Fat Purse.
Too many fat purses respond only
to the magic formula: Not to be
tossrs SURELY FMTIH
BLACK
^ ' rstcro .
50-dose pk». BiacMsz Pi»*. Vt üO
v „, , Vir, tv.i* ' Iter -, -.in.i'V«-«ui.tro-v
ri..
OnTy 0 ' ÎNÏl'iTüN CUT I EK i. H uouuu
ortler direct.
Th« Cuttar
by CUTTER S BUCKLIS PÎUS
w-p r i
h. reliai'l--;

Icrrert l>C v
'
;C.
Laborstory. Borkelay. Califarnia Jj
■dr
CHICHESTER SPILLS
BRAND
DIAMOND
for CIII-CHHS-TKR S
DIAMOND ukaND PILLS id Ki o and
Goi.D awtstlic I" ns Sealed with Blur
Ribbon. Takb no orpra. U,iy of your
Ilrarsai amt sat fur VÎIi-CliK8-TI.B S
UU IKIMI II 11 A N I» mu i-r l«rmr n»«
venrs regarded as Best.Safest, Always Reliable.
SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS
EVERYWHERE ILSXKJJ
o'
Ht
Sk

v
time:
TKiüL»
*T T Ï _ H >#. «f > _
ine Mother a
CZ. « '_*_/>,*A
KsflTlStmOLS Uitt
It never cornes to Christmas but I
think about the times
We used to save our pennies and
our nickels and our dimes,
And we bunched them ail together,
even little baby brother
Put in something for the present that
we always gave to mother.
|
I
We began to talk about it very early
in December,
Twas a very serious matter to US
children, I remember,
And we used to whisper nightly our
suggestions to each other,
For by nothing cheap and tawdry
could we show our love for
mother.
Hers must he a gift of beauty, fit to
symbolize her ways;
It must represent the sweetness and
thfi love tbit marked Her days,
It must be the best our money, all
combined, had power to buy,
be somethiag that she longed
for ; nothing else would satisfy.
ApJ
Then it mattered not the token, once
the purchase had been mede.
It was smuggled home and hidden
and with other treasures laid,
And we placed our present nr^udtv
in her lap on Christmas cHv,
And we smothered her with kisses
andwel.ughedhertear.away,
It never comes to Christmas but I
think about the times
We used to save our pennies and
our nickels a .d our dime^,
And the only folks I envy are the
si&t&aS wild tile LiOtilCiU
Who still have the precious privilege
of buying for their mothers.
—American Boy.
*
Here's a Merry
Christmas Game
HE old English game of tip re-1
quires the use of enough assorted
Christmas candies, nuts, raisins
and other dainties to make a small pik
upon a table, also a pair of sugar tonga
One of the party Is chosen, who must
retire to another room, white the re
maining players decide upon one of the
dainties in the pile to be known as
•tip.
T
The chosen person is then re
called and with the tongs removes
pieces from the pile, trying to avoid
the piece named Tip, of which, howev
er. he does not know the location. AH
pieces removed belong to him unless he
moves "tip." when ail must he returned
to the pile and the turn passes to the
next player, who retires to the othei
room while another "tip" Is named. A
player may pass his turn when, after
drawing several pieces, he wants to
avoid the possibility of losing them
through drawing "tip." The game con
finîtes until the pile disappears.
Ki^utimumuuuuut
I
Æ Christmas Acrostic
(Compiled from the Tuletide Utterances j
of Great Minds by Harvey Peake ln I
the Baltimore Sun.)
A LITTLE child, thou art our guest, j
That weary ones In thee may rest. !
—Martin Luther.
il
ISTI.ETOE hung In the castle hall.
The holly bough shown on the old oak 1
wall.
—Thomas Haynes Bayly.
E NGLAND was Merrie England when I
Old Christmas brought his spoils j
— Walter Scott. I
again.
R
TNG out ye crystal spheres,
Once bless our human cars!
î
—John Milton.
R AINT clouds possessed the earth
And sadly féll our Christmas Eve.
—Alfred ' Tennyson.
Y E who sang Creation's glory.
Now proclaim Messiah's birth. ,
—James Montgomery.
Ç TTRTST is born, the great anointed.
Heaven and earth his praises sing!
—J. Caword.
ARK. the herald angels sing:
"Glory to the new horn King!"
—Charles Wesley.
TNG the bells and raise the strain,
And hang up garlands everywhere.
—Susan Coolidge.
HEAR along our streets pass the min
strel throngs. .
Hark! They play so sweet on their haut
boys Christmas songs.—Longfellow,
' TNG the song of great Joy that the
angels began,
Sing of glory to God. and of good will
—John G. Whittier,
HIS day hath God fulfilled his prom
ised word,
This day Is born a Savior, Christ the
—J. Byron.
AT you have as many happy months
As you taste mince pies at Christmas.
—Old English Saying.
T Christmas play, and make good
cheer,
ï"or Christmas comes but once a year.
—Tusser.
OMETIMES with oysters we combine,
Sometimes assist tbs savory chine;
From the low peasant to the lord.
The turkey smokes on every board.
—Walter Gay.
n
R
I
S
L
to man!
I.ord.
n
;
A
I
5
"She has a most remarkable accent,
ham . t she? .
"Yos, she can't get enough tV in a
month to eat oysters."
PRONOUNCED VICTORIES.
Americans could not pronounce
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Sellers
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$1 DOWN
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*| A MOSt AppfOpfiate Gift fOF Wife, i|
Mother or Sister.
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Places this wonderful cabinet in
your home, and $1 a week pays :
for it.
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Grangeville
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aye iuq(ue(L!ciiU[3irt3i
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Will Hold a
SHOW AND SALE OF REGISTERED I
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SHORTHORNS
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Wed, Dee. IBtli, 1918
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35 Bulls 35
31 Females 31
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The Cattle Have Been Drafted From the Leading
Herds of the Northwest and many Choice
Animals will Be Found in the Offering.
y
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lijbl
afO
Cattle will Be Judged at 9 A. M.,
Sale will Follow Immediately
,1
$
Uc
.j
1
Joe Turner, Sales Mgr.
(
Geo. A. Cue,
H. C. Cranke,
Auctioneers
s
Vu
'niese foreign towns, you couldu't
make 'em!
Eut rie'tif them out a
.1 se<> them pounce
I'pon the chance to go anil take 'em!
Cartoons Magazine.
Let Reed loan your money.
1-tl
It
IN THE * ' FEU ' ' HOSPITAL.
First Patient: Why do the nursef;
wear nia»ksf
Second Patient (jiartly convalesce'
Ganse! —Cartoons Magazine.

!
Geo. M. Reed buys Mortgagee.

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