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Idaho County free press. [volume] (Grangeville, Idaho Territory) 1886-current, January 09, 1919, Image 1

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Extraordinary Career Ends with Death of
xooseoelt
.X
IDAHO COUNTY FREE PRESS
DEVOTED TO THE BEST INTERESTS OF ORANGEVILLE AND IDAHO COUNTY
I VOL. 33, NO. 34
$1.50 TUE VEAL
ORANGEVILLE. IDAHO. THURSDAY, JANUARY », 101»
REPUBLICANS
OF
STATE
.*
m
>
ADMINISTRATION
I democratic
YIELDS TO OPPONENTS—
legislature meets
PEÏÏIBONE IN SENATE RACE
Idaho Comity Solon High Man Among
Democrats for President Pro
Tem, hut is Defeated
I Joint inauguration of the new offi
■ eials of the Idaho state government and
S members of the fifteenth Idaho legisla
H tare took place in the house of repre
K sentative in Boise at noon Monday.
Immediately thereafter the Democrats
■ went out of power and the Republicans
■ took over their offices. The house of
S representatives organized with the elec
■ tion of M. 1. Kiger of Kootenai county
■ speaker and the senate with Senator
■ E. W. Whitcomb of Lemhi county presi
S dent pro tem.
I Simplicity featured the inaugural
■ ceremony, but at night one of the most
H brilliant receptions and inaugural balls
® was held with officials-elect as guests
■ of the city of Boise. The reception was
■ held in the rotunda of the new state
capitol with Governor and Mrs, Davis
■ at the head of the reception Jine. Other
■ state officials and their wives also re
■ ceived.
Governor anl Mrs. Davis led
B the grand march at the ball which was
V held in the Elk's temple. The marble
■ walls of the capitol were festooned in
B flags.
List of New Officials.
Incoming and outgoing officials are.
Incoming—Governor, D. W. Davis;
lieutenant governor, C. C. Moore; secre
I tary of state, R. O. Jones; auditor, E.
H. Gallet, treasurer, John W. Eagleson;
attorney general, Roy L. Black; super
intendent of publie instruction, Ethel
E. Redfield; mine inspector, Robert N.
Outgoing: Govrnor, M, Alexander;
lieutenant governor, E. L. Parker:
secretary of state, W. T. Dougherty;
auditor, Clarence'Vau Deusen; attorney
general, T. A. Walters.
William M Morgan, who succeeded
Alfred Budge as chief justice of the
supreme court administered the oath of
office to the new state officials, who
were introduced by their predecessors.
1
He also swore in the members of the
legislature. There was a slight depar
ture from the usual ceremony in that
state officials were sworn in before the
noon hour and the oaths were adminis
tered collectively to most of the offi
cials.

M. H. Eustace, chief clerk during the
Ust session, called the house to order
sad the Republican majority immedia
tely proceed to put its caucus program
into operation. Charloo D. Stony of
county, who withdrew from the
speakership race during the caucus,
nominated M. I. Kiger for speaker.
Adjutant General Moody, democratic
minority leader, moved the nomination
be made unaminous.
Harmony Urged by Speaker.
Accepting the gavel, Speaker Kiger
spoke briefly urging members on the
Floor to support and assist in the handl
ln K of legislative business and promis
ing fair and impartial treatment from
the chair. He predicted that because of
the important reconstruction problems
before the legislature the fifteenth
»ion will go dows as a record one.
Hy the same unanimous procoedure
the house attaches were elected and
«worn into office.
Ai -
ses
Pays Tribute to Roosevelt.
The house adjourued Monday out of
'cspcct to the memory/ of Theodore
Roosevelt after
N aipathy and respect.
passing a resolution of
lhe
senate organized immediately
after the joint session. E. L. Parker
.'ielded the gavel to Lieutenant Gover
Bor Moore, president, and the Repub
lican
majority proceeded to put through
caucus program over the opposition
"t the Democratic
Whitcomb
the
Senator
minority.
was eocted president pro tern
- 1 gainst N. B. Pettiborie of Idaho county
1 s enator Wedgcwood of Gooding
county, Loth Democrats, the vote staud
Boy
Whitcomb 24, Petti
iug as follows:
bone 11 and Wedgewood 7. Senators
Nelson of Kootenai, Tyler of Gem and,
Porter of Latah were appointel a com
mittee to inform the house that the
senate was organized, and an adjourn
ment was announced to 10 o'clock
Thursday morning out of respect to the
memory of Colonel Roosevelt.
Governor Davis delivered his message
to the legislature in joint assembly
Tuesday.
HOUSE BURNS TO THE GROUND
The home of George Farrens, on what
is known as the Owens place, two and
a half miles east of Mount Idaho, was
destroyed by fire Friday. The house
was a frame structure, one and a half,
stories high, Mrs. Farrens and chil
dren were at home when the fire start
cd. A part of the household furnish
Home of George Farrens Near Mount
Idaho Destroyed
ings was saved.
STRICT REGULATIONS ON
PUBLIC SCHOOL PUPILS
FORBIDDEN TO ATTEND SHOWS
DANCES AND CHURCH UN
TIL JANUARY 19
_____
Pupils of the Orangeville public
schools have been forbidden to attend
churches, theaters, dances, and all pub
lie gatherings, by an order issued by
the local board of education. The regu
lations will remain in force until Sun
day, January 19, and may be continued
at the option of the board. Purpose of
issuing the order is to guard against
spread of Spanish influenza, so that the
schools, which had been closed for sev
eral months, will not again be interrupt
ed.
YOUTH IS HELD FOR FORGERY
Alleged to Have Signed Name of Sol
Clark to Check.
Lee Woodworth, a young man, is in
the county jail awaiting hearing on a
charge of forgery preferred by the
Woodworth
Bank of Camas Prairie,
who hails from Oregon, and had been
working at the power plant, is alleged
to have signed the name of Sol Clark to
cheek for $84.50. He also had work
The youth claims to j
be 18 years of age. Hearing has been j
for January 15 in the probate ;
ed for Sol Clark.
CARROLL ROWE DIES OF WOUNDS
__
Boy With Orangeville Com
pany Succumbs.
court.
Nezperce
Carroll Rowe, a Neperce boy who was
enlisted in Company E, of Ôrangeville,
has died of wounds "incurred in battle
wounded one day
am! died the next, according to avices
He was
in France.
eceived here.
t
Message of Governor Davis
to the Idaho Legislature
Members of the Fifteen session of
the state legislature:
To the people of this generation has
been given a great opportunity. We
have taken part in the most gigantic
struggle in history. It has been a test
ing period. Under the stress of the
crisis and struggle, we have been com
view events with enlarged
vision to cast aside personal and even
"ti nal self-interest and to realize
3 - 10 'responsibilities to promote the
nernl welfare of mankind. We have
learned nothing new about the abstract
. , - ... nothing new in theory
about 8 liberty, equality and fraternity,
I t we have learned much about their
■!" ctical application. A tremendous
iictus has been given to all progressi-e
We do not have
polled to
out
welfare movements,
to Book or
awakened moral and social conscious
to find evidences of an
OF RECONSTRUCTION-1
ness.
PROBLEMS
The end of the great war has brought
the nation, mmy,
to the state, as to
many problems calling for the exoroide
o
PRIVATE THOMAS DOESN'T LIKE
THE "COONS" IN VIRGINIA
COAST CITY
Private Edward G. Thomas, formerly
0 f Lucile, but. who now is in the army
, at Newport News, Va„ doesn't like the
Virginia seaport town, and the many
j negroes he encounters there, he writes
; to the Free Press. His letter follows:
Camp Casino, Va.
Dec. 29, 1918.
Dear Editor:
I thought I would write you a little
dope to put in the Free Press about
the camp and its surroundings. My
homo is at Lucile, Idaho, down on the
big Salmon river and we always thought
that was a tough little country, but
Newport News, Va. is so much tougher
t i, ail 0 i d Salmon that the river wouldn't
be j„ j t a ji_
a few days ago down here on the
beach a negro girl, 1 should judge about
18 or 19 years of age, was found on the
sand with her throat cut from oar to
ear, and this morning, as I was going
along the Chesapeake bay with my
camera taking pictures of transports, I
. came across a negro man who had been
, knocked in the head and had been
thrown in the bay. The tide washed
him ashore and to tell the truth the man
has been lying there qll day and the
water slashing up on his feet. His face
is about washed under with sand and
they arc not making any arrangements
to take care of the body. The body of
' the negro girl has been lying on the
j sand for four days and is still lying
I think this place has got any place j
beaten that I have ever seen. The j
town is dirty at all times and the
smell is something awful. We are now j
doing guard duty on the pier' here and j
we surely have to watch the coons. I
there,
j
Press,
cause I saw it with my own eyes and
please send me a copy of the paper you
wish you would put this in the Free
It is the honest God's fact be-i
1
I remain,
Your soldier friend,
Private Edward G. Thomas.
put it in.
K Co., 12 Inf., Camp Casino.
Newport News, Va.
CASSADY MAY LOSE HIS JOB
-
Ex-Grangeville 'Man on State Board
Designated for Removal.
attorney who now- is a member of the
state industrial accident board, is likely
to lose his job. Cassady was appointed
by ex-Governor Alexander to the posi
tion, which pays $6000 a year, but the
W. H. Cassady, former Orangeville
appointment was not ratified by the
state senate. The appointments of
j Cassady, E. F. Caton and G. H. Fisher,
: all members of the board, will come be
j fore the senate at the present session
i but, according to word from Boise, the
' senate will turn down both Cassady and
Fisher, who is a Democrat, has
j Caton,
gained favor of the Davis adnunistra
'ion and will remain on the board.
j Oaten is a Republican and labor's re
! presentative
I a Democrat.
the board. Cassady is
on
of a wise discretion and right motives.
The solution of these problems is noi
to be found in the answer to the query
to whether proposed reforms will
benefit one class or one industry. The
you
before you is whether or not it promotes
the general welfare. To you who are!
here assembled has been delegated a.
great opportunity. I feel sure that you
will not miss it in the consideration
of trivial and self seeking proposals.
You have the opportunity to carry out
a largo constructive, statesmanlike pro
gram—one which will lay the founda
1 tion for increased growth during many
im--years to come. Some features of such
a program so far as they relate to the
state's administration I desire to pre
as
only test which your constituency asks
to apply to legislation proposed
sent to you.
COUNCIL OF DEFENSE.
The creation of a state council of
defense as a recognized official body
calls for your early oonsideratmn. The
the nation eoôperatlng with th« na
i'CoWtinued tra nöxt pag'd)
NEW OFFICERS TO
TAKE OATHS ON
CHANGES TO BE MADE IN THE
COURT HOUSE—DEPUTIES
ARE SELECTED,
One New Member of County Board—
Eutirely New Force In Office of
Sheriff and Treasurer.
Monday will mark changes in county
offices of Idaho county. Newly elected
officials of the county will assume of
fice, and their predecessors, who have
held office for the previous term will
retire.
County-offieers elect this week an
nouced the appointment of their depu
ties.
The board of county commissioners
will meet Monday in the regular Janu
ary meeting, at which time oaths of of
fice will be administered to the newly -
elected officials.
One Change in Board
But one change will take place it) the
pc-sonngl of the board of county com
missioners. Edward Vincent of White-:
bird will succeed Rbbert Giffith, also of
Whitebird, us commissioner from thi
Third district. Jonn D. Long of
Orangeville will continue to represent
the Second district, and Dale Clark of
Kooskia will represent the First dis
trict. They are member of the present
board.
In the Sheriff's Office.
■ IV, H. Eller on Monday will become
sheriff, succeeding L. R. Y'ates. Mr
Yates will engage in fanning. He owns
a ranch a mile northwest of Orangeville.
Sheriff-elect Eller has pointed .1 hi
Harriraan of Grange* ill
deputy, while B n Roben- m of Co" m
wood will be office dep 'y under Ir.
Eller. •
nding
as
Deputy Sheriff Tim Qn il.:n, who
been deputy under Sl-erif: Y-iti and al
so deputy under ex Eher O- i rin i.i. is
undecided on plans for the future.
Deputy Sheriff .lohn W. Po\v. !l w ill
devote ris time to farming.
!
.
:
Mrs. Otie Cone becomes treasurer, |
suceeding J. A. Bradbury.
County Treasurer.
Mrs. Cone ■
has appointed W. N. Knox as deputy in
her office.
Mr. Bradbury, immediately he retires
from public office will assume active
management of the Bradbury cigar
store. Mrs. Emma Medved, deputy for
Treasurer Bradbury, has no special plans
for the future.
Clerk Auditor and Recorder
Henry Teicher succeeds himself as
county clerk, auditoi and recorder. Mr.
Teicher will make no changes in his
office.
been clerk of the local draft board, and
was associated with the clerk's office
Theodore Tollefson who had
the government
has- been retired by
because no more draft work remains to
be done. Deputies in the office of the
clerk, auditor and recorder .are Harold
Harris anl Miss Florence Munay.
Copyists are Mrs. M. L. Derrig and Miss
Margaret Re bin son.
Superintendent of Schools.
Miss Margaret Sweet succeeds herself
as superintendent of schools. Miss Bes
sie Coyne, deputy, will continue in the
retained a „ 0 ffi ee deputy.
g Auger becomes prosecuting attor
ney, succeeding E. M. Griffith. W.j
l, Campbell succeeds himself as pro-j
bate judge. A . J. Maugg will become
(;0 roner, in place of George W. Trenary.
DISTRICT COURT TERMS FIXED
-
Judge Scales Sets Dates of Sessions tn
Three Counties.
Judge Wallace N. Scales of the Tenth
judicial district has issued'an order fix
ing terms of district court for the yna
office.
Calvin Hazelbaker succeeds himself
Mrs. Fred White will be
as assessor.
1919. The date» are as follows:
Idaho county—April J, BcptcmN. 1
Nezporco county—February 10, June
16, October 27,
Lewis county—May 12, October 6.
I
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS ELECT
Officers for Ensuing Year Chosen at
Monday Night Meeting.
( Buffalo Hump lodge No. 30, Knights
of Pythias, elected the following named
I officers at the lodge meeting Monday
night to serve for the ensuing year:
Harold Harris, chancellor commander.
Arthur R. Wiley, vice chancellor.
Charles 8. Smith, prelate.
Gilbert W. Eimets. master of works.
B. Auger, master of finance and
keeper of records and seal.
W. W. Brown, master of exchequer.
Geo. D. Willey W. H. Campbell,
trustees.
I
Chester C. Gager, master at arms.
Madison Myers, inner guard.
George Mires, outer guard.
The local lodge has nine members in
tbo ^rvice of the country and the ser
vice flag of the order bears one gold
star for Henry J. Hosterman, who was
killed in action in France on November
UA ill Ann Cl MAL* HOTAOCD
NO WUKU uINuL UuIUuLK
HEFTS DEATH
IN BATTLE
j
IDAHO COUNTY SOLDIER KILLED
WHILE FIGHTING THE
HUNS IN FRANCE
1Jay of Dcath Is Not H ere-_
Two Brothers Give Up Their
Lives In War
Ralph Brockman, au Main
■oupty
■ ■I, v.ho went with the May -elective*
rvi«-i- contingent from Orangeville, has
lulled in Cattle in France. Exact
• :i

re-eived Imm him
te when he met dentil i not know
No word had »been
iin-e October, until
message came
lint he had -pen killed.
Mr. truckman who was 24 years old.
mi of Dr. J. (), Brockman, of
I ( i-kcnridgc, Tex., und formerly of
1 illr-. Be was u nephew of Bert'
Brockman of this city.
I i.-\ ions to on
tering the army ho had resided with an
unde, (.'. W. Brockman, of Creston, Wn.,
Lut since he was registered for the army
rdnho county, he canto to Orangeville
t0 en t e r the service,
Mr. Brockman was a brother of Ivan)
I Brockman, who died at sea, in N'ovem
j i, eri w yi e on a transport presumably
! | )ound for Prance,
Ivan also was in the
army.
EAGLES' OFFICERS INSTALLED
Local Aerie Picks Leaders for Ensuing
j
Year.
The local aerie of Eagles has installed
,,fr'i«-»-,-*» for the ensuing year as follows:
Van Robertson, past worthy president.
Thomas Thompson, worthy president.
J. W Eresch, vice president.
William Soltmai), chaplain.
J. N. Oliver, treasurer.
H. Roth well, secretary.
J; C; Graves, conductor.
Fred Lyda, trustee.
J. E. Richards, outer guard.
Earl Wilson, inner guard.
;
1
I
KNORR SELLS 500-ACRE RANCH
-
C. B. Knorr has sold his 300-acre
ranch four and one-half miles norfb
west of Orangeville to Charles H. Ever
on Camas Prairie in several years.
-
WOODMEN OF WORLD INSTALL.
G range ville camp No. 206, Woodmen
of lhe World, on Monday night
stalled officers as follows:
Big Land Deal Put Through—Everest
Is Purchaser
The purchase price was not re
est.
vealed, but the deal is known to have
been one of the biggest consummated
H. R^thwell past council commander-!
J. W Eresch. council commander.
Bert Pearson, advising lieutenant.
W. J Soltman, banker
Lee Kabat, escort.
Wilford Derrig, watchman..
Jtorle Markham, Borntinol
r
J*i
f
I.
k*
im
FUNERAL WITHOUT POMP OB
CEREMONY—GRAVE FA 1ES
LONG- ISLAND SOUND
GRIEVED OVER LOS, if SON
Death of Quentin and Wounding of
Archie Believed to Have
Hastened End
Col. Theodor® Roosevelt, twice presi
dent of the United States, died early
Monday morning in his home at Saga
more Hill, Oyster Bay, L. I. Death was
sudden, and was duo to rheumatism
which affected bis heart.
a
of rheumatism and sciatica on New
Yar's day, but none believed bat his
illness was likely to prove fatal.
The former president sat up most of
Sunday and retired at 11 o'clock Sun-'
day night. Ho returned to his homo on
Sagamore hill from the Roosevelt hos
pital on Christmas day, but a week
later was stricken with a. severe at
tack of rheumatism and sciatica, from
j which he has boon suffering for some
t ime.
! right hand and it became much swollen.
He remained in his room ami efforts
Were made to check the trouble.
Burial Service Is Simple
Colonel Roosevelt was buried without
pomp or ceremony in Young's Memorial
.■emctery at Oyster Buy Wednesday af
ternoon. He was buried on a knoll
) overlooking Long Island sound, a plot
j which he and Mrs. Roosevelt .elected
soon after le left the White House.
Aftei j layers at the Roosevelt home,
which only members of the family
I c cut. the funeral service was
j
rheumatism affoced h *
The
!
1 CI al 12:40 in Christ Epi- -opal church,
tU .in. old frame structure wiero for
x - the colonel and his family attend
ed divine worship.
T!.o d nth of Colonel Ro-u-cvelt is be
lie- d Ly the physicians who ; ttended
him to have been hastened by grief
in, I tin- death of bis son. Qucn in, who
was killed in France, coupled with anx
j tv OV( ,,. t j u . —..('ions wounds offered
j.
'apt. Aivbie Roosevelt.
Grieved for Dead. Son.
He .was proud of his soldier sons
ami their heroism, but he was a de
nt- d father and he grieved foi the one
gam
well as for the other who was wounded.
He hid his suffering from tin world,
however, in the hope that he might sot
nu o \. • in j It* for other fathers and moth
ers wh
hid given their sons to the
nation. #
To the last Colonel Boose , dt hod been
proa hing ''Americanism," aid few
realized that his h-alth h id be -n siial
It was believed that the rugged
, custituti t-i which had -toil him in
sll ,.|, good stead through sn many years ,
t-nd.
"strenuous" life would not 'ail Vi -.
he would re a in his usual
and that
health,
jhad been
of editorials or public
His messages of Lite, howove ,
delivered through the medium
statements in
of addresses.
'Put Out the Light, Please."
stead
It was 4:13 o'clock Monday morning
that t!i former president died in his
His death was due
sleep, painlessly,
directly to a blood clot lodged in one
result
of inflammatory
the
luug.
rheumatism.
"Put out the. light, please,"
the former president's last words. They
'addressed to his personal attend
ant, James Amos, a young negro, who
had been in his service since he left
the White House, and who was sitting
were
were
at the foot of his bed.
Some time later- Amos noticed that
the patient was breathing hea- ly, and
became alarmed.
He left the oom to
«
who had been sv.rumonod
call fho nurse
from Oyster Bay Sunday. When they
returned Colonel Roosevelt bad breath
They called Mrs. Boose
-I his last.
the only member of the family
velt.
who was at horn'
remove to lucile ranch
Clyde Van Sise .-fuel family diave re
moved from'" G-ange ville to the Dy, W
F. Pogui- ranch noaj- Lucile Mr MW
j Slue will man«#» the lanoh.
k

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