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Idaho County free press. [volume] (Grangeville, Idaho Territory) 1886-current, January 09, 1919, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091100/1919-01-09/ed-1/seq-2/

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CONSTABULARY TO
ENFORCE LAWS
RETIRING ATTORNEY GENERAI
MAKES RECOMMENDATIONS
IN BIENNIAL REPORT
DECLARES II IS NECESSARY
Impossible for State to Accede t» Re
quests for Detectives—No
Fluids Available
1 rcation ol a state constabulary to |
exorcise for the state powers and duties)
ordinarily exercised by sheriffs in conn- 1
tics is recommended by T. A. Walters,
retiring attorney general, iu his biennial
report to the governor as being "well
night
thorough enforcement of state laws.
' ' Many
obtaining 1
necessity'' in
complaints with respect to
violations of law in various counties
eu made to this department with
«that detectives offi
have 1
for the purpose of making
cers lie scut
investigations, and, if sufficient evi
dence is discovered, institute pnisecu
lions,'' the report states. "In many
instances it has been charged that the
local officers arc derelict in their duties
or refuse to act.
Can't Comply With Requests.
"It is impossible of course for this
office to accede to such requests as no
appropriation was made for such pur
pose, nor is there any special officer
who is attached to this office who,
under authority of law, could make such
investigations.
"Since assuming the duties of this
office, experience has led me to the
conclusion that the creation of a state
constabulary is well night a necessity.
If the state had such officer or officers
with jurisdiction and authority co-ox
tensive with the boundaries of the'state
attached to the executive department
and with the powers and duties ordi
narily exercised by a sheriff, I beli ve
he or they would be of material aid and
assistance in the enforcement of law.''
Further Recommendations
Another recommendation is that qua
lifications for electors us given in the)
school code he simplified, the present
fourteen qualifications set out being
too confusing many instances
conflicting. The attorney general
would also give the stale the perfer
cnee right to purchase bonds of all
$ school districts instead of only common
school districts, us at present,
"'The school 1«« with reference to
the division of seho. I districts should
bo so amended as io appo/tion the as
sets and liabilities between the old
trict and the ue« one, - ' the report ad
vises. •
An appropriation to enfo e the blue
ski law is recommended
CHAMBERLAIN S COUGH REMEDY
Before using this preparation ('or a
cough or cold you may wish to know
what it has done for others. Mrs. O.
Cook. Macon, III., writes, "1 have found
it gives the quickest relief
remedy 1 have ever used.''
A. Knott, Chillicothe, Mo., says "Cham
brlain 's Cough Remedy cannot be beat
for cought and colds." II. . 1 . Moore,!
Oval, Pa., says •
lain 's Cough Remedy on
sions when I was suffering with a sot
tied cold upon the'chest and it has al ■
ways brought about a cure.
if any cough
Mrs. dames
I have used Chamber
several oeca
f .. -S
..
^ I
' J
;
After several mouths' ilia Anton :
Stahb
FERDINAND
♦ r '• »■
I • • •

• ora hospital. Funeral services
held .Sunday morning from th.- Catholic
«ere
■hurch.
After spending about six weeks visit
ng his parents i i Ohio, Orval Holderbv
icturned here Friday.
d. M. McMin-ry and Roy Good«11 spent
several days at Lewiston and Spokane
recently.
Miss Anns liàbermnii is visiting ,rel
"lives at Clarkston this week.
Mr, and Mrs. Glen Sears of Connell,
Wn., were here last
week visiting the
parents of Mrs. Sears, Mr. and Mrs. d.
A. Terwillegar.
W. d. Peacock was in town Sunday.
Miss Beatrice Sasse «eut to Lewiston
Sunday where she
studies at the Normal.
School opened here last Monday with
a fair attendance.
Miss Myers
d Sunday.
Oliver Reynold^ is dangerously ill
with pneumonia.
Miss Lu ci h Bass,, wu» home frdm Cot
ton wood last week. She «-as suffering
Itom a mild attack c vf influenza.
will resume her
returned from Cotton
woo
" Message of Governor Davis
to the Idaho Legislature
(Continued from page 1)
tionai council of defense, have been
vital factors in the winning of the war.
The national council of defense has
I '(nested that the council of defense sys
I tern bo continued in the national inter
1 meeting the exigencies and emergencies
■ incident to post war readjustment.
I apprehend you will feel as I do thit
such a request from the national council
' for fl "' I H,r Pose of co-operating wit*
' and «"pplcmeutiug federal agencies i
::
■alls for a patriotic ana unhesitating
'onipiianee.
The national council of defense has
very properly limited its request to the
immediate emergency, but 1 desire to
present for your consideration the pro
position of giving perimanency to the
state council of defense to meet ai.v
emergency that may arise .in tho future
Having learned the value of an orner
j
,
gency-body of patriotic citizens, sori
ng without compilation and in the in
torest of the public welfare, is the war
•mergency, we should take advantage
„(• the lesson,
The council of defense should lie call
eil into h eing at any time of need upon
proclamation of the governor and be
subject to dissolution at his discretion,
t should have the power and duty to
< arrv on
.mid, measures as are deemed necessary
to meet the emergency and to co-ordi
mite the emergency activities of the
state with those of the federal govern
ment and of other states.
HEROES MEMORIAL.
men in khaki, it has not been spurred
on by the financial quickening that
caine from lucrative war indturtries. Yet
Idaho has been iu the front rank of ser
vice through all this war period. No
state.in the Union as given more lavish
ly according to population and wealth
than has this inlermountain state of
ours. But our greatest giving has not
been in money. Our greatest asset is
not «heat, or wool, or minerals. The
young generation is our biggest asset.
Wo have given the best in our homes.
We have laid our sons on the altar of
sacrifice; With a wonderful spirit our
young men answered the call of their
country with the gift of all they had. |
Idaho has been without tho stimulus
a great cantonment, it has lacked
the thrill ami -inspiration of marching
if
All honor to them, the living und tho I
iVir sacrifices, them deed« have |
brought imperishable glory to the name i
Wherever they have been j
placed they have done their full duty,
They have helped to write a new, a world !
dead.
of Idaho,
Magna Charta. All have faced th
peril of war without flinching, some,
like tht- Christ have paid the full price
of world redemption by tin* gift
their lives.
As a state we owe these soldier boys
of ours a debt of gratitude, a debt too
deep for complete payment. But we
owe it to ourselves and to our children
in concrete ways to express our ap
preciation of tho sacrifices these have
made. To do them honor becomes
solemn and bounded duty.
It is- alto
gether fitting and proper that this state
erect some beautiful, suitable and en
during memorial that shall voice onr ap
preciation of the honor they have
brought to onr stnte.
Not onlv in marble and bronze should
our appreciation be symbolized but our
gratitude should ho expressed in some
living way, that actually helps these
men. No better thing can bo done, and
surely no less thing should he done, than
to open every possible door of employ
ment and opportunity for those who
hazarded their whole future for onr
safety and the safety of our children.
AMERICANIZATTON.
Not the least important of the prob
loins facing us at. this period is the
training of onr foreign immigrants in
om
the duties of citizenship, and the e
(Uilsorv education of all persons who
cannot read, write and speak the Eng
'»"image. We «s a state ought to
s,10 ' v our Cratitnde for the sacrifices of
: f1oa<1 ;in ' 1 by exalting the princi
ples or which they strove. We need to
lay a new emphasis on Americanism.
'onr braie sons and honor one heroes.
i Tj0t K "ri>»h be the speech of all assein
i bites and the primary language in al!
" ,,r ■" hools. Let the-e he if more com
I' let '' knowledge of onr own history and
of onr own syste n of government. Let
there he further stressing of the pri
vileges, and obligations of citizenship.
Let there be an intelligent movement
for the Americanization of all who
come here to make a home. For those
who forget their debt to this country
and favored our foes, openly or covertly
let them know by the weight of ostra
cism that such treachery is neither con
doned nor forgotten,
educational institutions, all onr church
es. all of onr fraternal orders, teach
onr
»er
Let all of our
the message of the new- day which
brave heroes hnve brought us. that
vice to humanity is man 's first obliga -1
tion.
NATIONAL PROHIBITION AMEND
MENT
fhi» legislature has the opportunity
to continue, in the language of our
constitution, to "further all wise and
well directed efforts for the promotion
of temperance and morality. No doubt
exists in tho mind of anyone but that
among your first acts will be the rati
fication of the amendment to the fed
eral constitution prohibiting the manu
facture and sale of intoxicating liquors.
'
WOMAN SUFFRAGE
The influence of public spirited and
intelligent women in aiding in the es
tablishment of a high standard of pub
lic morality and in stimulating welfare
activités cannot be overestimated. The I
principle of equality iu the exercise of j
the suffrage is gaining a world wide
recognition. I hope the day is not far
distant when it will become an inte
gral part of our national, as it is now a
part of our state constitution.
STIMULATING OF ENDUS'x-Y.
In this period of reconstruction and
demobilization we must not permit tho
great army of men gathered to combat
11 !.« savage forces
turn to a peace of enforced idleness.
Tho return of a country from war
tivity to peace activity is apt to bo a
period of economic pinching for many
classes of citizens and skilled laborers.
of aiitocracv
o lf
ac
j
. he return of thousands from war camps
is bound to further complicate the pro-.
blent and congest the labor market. The
time has passed when a state can safely
leave this transition situation solely to
individuals to solve for themselves. Idle
ness. want and under-nourishment are
costly, uneconomic and the culture beds
of anarchy and disorder. The cheapest
and safest plan, as well as the most
patriotic and statesmanlike, is to obviate
this labor congestion by a wise, con
strnctive program of employment and
improvements that shall tide us over
this period of economic and labor ad
To this end as far as possi-1
justment.
bio returning soldiers ought to be rein
stated in their old positions. In new
employment, as far as is consistent with
efficiency in management, these de
mobilized soldiers, sailors and war work
ers ought to have the first chance.
Every effort of public and private
enterprise should Do directed toward
the immediate emnstnietion of worth
while. necessary public improvements,
that, shall /U'fflrd employ mont to our
loyal citizen*. Th* legislature can,
provide directly for public buildings and I
state highways and indirectly, by fav
„ring legislation and by its example, for
municipal and local improvements and
reclamation works.
But more powerful than legislation
the maintenance of a state of public
confidence. Having seen our vigorous
democratic people rise to a great crisis
in world politics, let us entertain no
fear that they will not meet success
fully the transition from a great mill
lary force to an army of industry,. The
people of Idaho especially have no cause
for apprehension but that the state is
capable of re absorbing its returning!
young men in its Countless undeveloped
opportunities in agricultural and indus -
tral pursuits.
FEDERAL CO-OPERATION.
T particularly desire to call your at
tention to the many activities carried
on bv the national government the
benefit of «hieb the state can only re
eelve by co-operation in the expendi
ture, The principal lines of federal aid
in the state at the present time are;
Educational aid. agricultural aid. road
aid and the eo-operation of the federal
geological survey in water measure
ment«. All of thee.- activities should
reeeive consideration and adequate pro
vision be made to provide tbe necessary
state funds.
Everything that can bp done should
be done by the legislature and the peo
ple to encourage the proposed réclama
jtion by the federal government, of 2 . 000 , j
000 acres of available desert lands in
addition to those alreadv reclaimed. This
bind when reclaimed will furnish homes I
for the returning soldiers and sailors
who so riehly deserve to receive this
heritage from a grateful nation. •
EDUCATIONAL AID.
Tbe last legislature failed to accept
the provisions of the national eduea
tionai aid act of Feb. 23, 1917,
monly known as tbe Smith-Hughes act.
but bv n congressional relief act the
state was enabled to secure its benefits
until tbe meeting of this legislature. J
feel sure vou will without delav aecep*
the provisions of said net.
com
HIGHWAYS
The good faith of the state is "pledg
ed to make available funds sufficient
equal the sums apportioned to the
state by nr under the United States gov
ernment during «ich and all of tho five
years for which federal funds
preprinted'' by the rural post roads net
oi July 11, 1916. During the biennium j
to
are ap
'* b* necessary for the state to
raise a million dollars in order to take
full advantage of federal, aid for rural
post roads and forest roads.
Nothing will be so beneficial to this
(Continued on page 5)
SUGGEST HEMS
TO HMD GOLD
ELIMINATION OF EXCESS PROFITS
TAX ON OUTPUT IS RE
COMMENDED.
INDUSTRY INJRED BY WAR
Privilege of Free Exports and Sale to
Manufacturers Advised in Report
Secretary Lane.
Elimination of, the excess profits tax
on gold mining and the privilege of free
exports and of sale to manufacturers as
means of stimulating gold production j
were recommended in a report recently
of the special committee appointed by
Secretary of the interior Lane at Wash
"igfon to investigate the causes of the (
decline in the output.
"Gold mining has been seriously in
jured by the war,'' said the report "and
has been discriminated against for the
protection and benefit of the treasury in
I ' th .'' eXp ° rt ° f g °' d and 6Ven ln '
ternal free trade in the metal was in
terrupted.''
Causes for Output Decrease.
The chief cause given by the com
I ihittee for the falling off in output was
j the increase in operating costs from
57 cents for a dollar's worth of gold
I in 1917 to 70 cents in 1918
j "The present decreas in gold pro
jductkm is serious,'' said the report "as
the maintenance of a sufficient gold re
1
serve is essential to our national fiuan
e es and credit.''
Possible methods of maintaining the
visible gold reserve, the committee said,
j would be in tho curtailing of the use of
gold for manufactures and iu a call on
tho public to turn in hoarded gold. Fur
ther relief might he obtained, it
said, by amending the war minerals bill
to include gold and the voting of an ap
probation to be used in directing the
search for new deposits.
In this connection the committee de
was
dared that the future of gold mining
in , bt . WO rld was problematical; that
"SAY IT WITH FLOWERS''
-1
I
I
j
I
1
Whatever
the
birth, a death, a joy, a sorrow—
occasion
a
you can liest show your pleasure
or sympathy by saying it with
flowers.
Fred Garby
Store 856 Main St,
Phones:
Store, 843
Res., 625-R
LEWISTON, IDAHO
ARNOLD & HUNTER *
W aler and Lighting Systems for the Farm 1 !
Tinning and Plumbing
t Grongeclle, - . /</<,/,<, "
(
I
Many people fail
to make the acquain
tance of a bank un
til they need mon
ey and then they
wonder why the
bank does not know
them.
• «
» »
Built L!pon Public Confidence ' •
the gold output of the world seemed to
have passed its zenith.
Drop In Gold Production.
Gold production in the United States
in 1918 fell to 3,313,000 fine ounces,
worth 168,493,000, the lowest total iu
twenty years, and silver dropped to 67,
879,000 fine ounces, worth $67,879,000
at standard government price of $1 an
ounce the smallest record since 1913,
according to the joint preliminary esti
mate of Director of the Mint Baker and
I ,he geological survey.
California led as a gold-producing
state, the estimate showing 832,389
ounces valued at $17,207,000, while
Colorado ranked second with 621,791
ounces valued at $12,853,000. Montana
with 15,341,000 ounces, with the princi
pal silver-producing state, while Utah
gave 13,439,000 ounces, Idaho 10,188,000
and Nevada 10,183,000.
For Fire, Burglary, Livestock, Steam
Boiler, Life, Health and Accident in
surance, see Herv Bothwell.
29-tf
Fire insurance—Ayers
27-tf
CUBED AT A COST OF 25 CENTS,
"Eight years ago when we first moved
to Mattoon, 1 was a great sufferer from
indigestion and constipation,'' writes
Mrs. Robert Allison,
Mattoon, Ill.
ha<l frequent headaches and dizzy spells,
"T
,.l
I
Our January
Sale Begins
TODAY
With spring purchases now enroule, and our
annual inventory just finished wo are placing
some unusual offerings on our center tables.
One Jot consisting of several thousand yards
Ginghams, Si ko lines, Flan
nelctts, Eden Cloth, Crepes, Ser in, Voilles, etc.
Most of these items worth 50 cents the yard.
On sale today at the present value of Calico—
25 CENTS THE YARD.
Wash ^Suiting,
One lot White and Fancy Gaberdines, Beach
cloth, novelties in spring fabrics, Mixed Suit
ings, worth from 75 cents to $1.00. ON SALE
AT 50 CENTS THE YARD
p
p
»!
I
In
Big opportunity in Silk.
Choice from a nice
selection, grades up to $2.75 the yard.
SALE AT $1.95.
ON
Wool Suiting»—almost unobtainable at dou
ble our present price, we will allow a general
discount from our present low prices of 10 P. C.
THIS SALE IS FOR THE BENEFIT OF OUR
CUSTOMERS—BUY DURING OUR JANU
ARY SALE FOR THE OFFERINGS ARB
UNUSUAL
J. Frank Sims
WANTED
t
*
-i
•>
+
:


Young Men as Operators |
at Power Plant
+
4 +
4
+
I
1
st
v
i
v
■a
+
*
V
ORANGEVILLE
ELECTRIC LIGHT & POWER CO
:
r
+
-c
+
v
•I
and there was a feeling like
weight pressing
chest all the time.
a heavy
1
my stomach
I felt mi
_ nu serahlp
Lvery morsel of food distressed me ,
could not rest at night and fel t -
and worn out all the time. Q ne bott ,
of Chamberlain's Tables cured 16
I have since felt like
me and
a different
per
son. ' '
T AKEN UP—Estrayed Bed
same by proving
perty. L. Neal, Orangeville.
cow.
Owner can have
pro
31-tf
Boiled barley for sale. Will deliv
Denver Flour Mills, Penn, Ida.
er.
27-tf
FOB SALE OB TBADE—220 acre* o(
land; 120 under cultivation; 75 mor#
can be cultivated; plenty of «ater
500,000 feet good saw timber on 1 ^
Apply W. H. Vincent, Harpster',
19-tf
Ida.
Application For Grazing Permits.
Notice is hereby given that all
plications for permits to graze cattle
horses, and sheep within the VP?'
PERCE NATIONAL FOREST
the season of 1919, must be filed in my
office at Orangeville, Idaho, on or be
fore February 15, 1919.
S. V. FULLÀWAY Jr., Supervisor. 334
will do custom rolling. Dcnv
Flour Mills, Penn, Ida.
a:.
during
We
cr
27-tf
I
Farms for sale—Ayers.
27-tf

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