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Idaho County free press. [volume] (Grangeville, Idaho Territory) 1886-current, February 27, 1919, Image 1

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Company E Lands in New Yorfy After 14 Months at War
IDAHO COUNTY FREE PRESS
DEVOTED TO THE BEST INTERESTS OF ORANGEVILLE AND IDAHO COUNTY
»
VOL. 33, NQ. 41
ORANGEVILLE, IDAHO, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1919
$1.50 THE YEAR
OPEN
COMMISSION TO INVESTIGATE
ABILITY OF INDIANS TO
HANDLE OWN AFFAIRS
TRUST EXPIRES IN JUNE, '20
Some probably Will Be Permitted to
Sell or Lease Without Govern
ment Supervision
At least a portion «f the Nez Perce
Indian reservation, a large part of
which lies in Idaho county, will be re
leased from the trust in which it is now
held, judging from information which
come from Washington, D. C.
Cato Sells, commissioner of Indian
affairs, will send a commission to the
reservation to determine the ability of
the Nez Perces to handle their own
affairs, which heretofore have been di
rected by the commissioner of Indians.
The investigation is to be made before
the present trust period expires, in
June, 1920.
The department of the interior, it is.
said, proposes to extend the trust period
for those Indians who are adjudged
incompetent to handle their own busi
ness matters. The commission which
will conduct the investigation will
recommend to the department names et !
Indians who should receive patents to
their allotments and those Indians
thereafter will be free from govern
ment supervision in the matter of leas
ing or selling their lands
It is pointed out that it will be use
less) for the Nez Perce Indians to visit
Washington or to send delegations t
the commissioner of Indians on mat
ters dealing with the trust adminis
tration, as all decisions as to eompe
teney will be left with the special com
mission sent to the reservation* where |
personal investigations as to business
ability, general character and indus
try can best bo made.
Stubbs Leads Local Boys—Thirty-two
Sign Up I
SCOUT TROOP IS ORGANIZED
Orangeville troop No. 1, Boy Scouts,
of
No more
Sheldon A. Stubbs
is scout master. Troop committee con
has been organized, with
thirty-two boys on the roll.
will be accepted.
names
aists of S. V. Fullaway, John P.
Eimers, and M. R. Hattabaugh. Assist
ant scout masters are Toni Crossley, Leo
Kabat and Wilford Derrig.
The boys will be given lessons in for
«stry, first aid and rope splicing.
8- V. Fullkway, supervisor of the j
Nezperce forest, will provide a man
from the forest service to take the |
boys into the forest one day a month. J
Dr. O. A. Green will b instructor in rope |
■Plicing, and Dr. B. Chipm
*truct in first aid.
an will in
TBACTOR AND ENGINE SCHOOL
Expert will Instruct In Operation of
Machinery
The Miller Hardware & Implement
of this city has arranged a free
factor, automobile and gasoline en
Jlfls school at its place of business on
March 6, 6 and 7. An expert on farm
taachinery will be present and will in
•truct all who care to learn how to re
®edy troubles which arise in the opera
bon of tractors, automobiles and on
Sines. The Miller company has issued
invitation to farmers and all others
"terested
to attend this school.
PIONEER WOMAN IS AT BEST
**• J - G. Rowton Burled In Falrvlew
Cemetery.

The body of Mrs. J. O. Rowton, an
^ pioneer resident, of lâaho county,
**• buried Tuesday in Pairview eeme
Mrs. Rowton died in her homo
*1 Kooskia. She formerly resided in j
" r * ll 8eville and was well known on the
She was the wife of J- G. Row
S owner of the Hour mill at Kooskia. |
FOREST SERVICE WILL USE
WIRELESS TELEPHONES TO
REPORT FIRES NEXT SUMMER
^ ireless telephones are to be used in the
U. S. forest service in north Idaho next summer,
this is the auouneement made from the office of
the district forester at Missoula, Mont.
Whether the wireless telephone will bo used
in the Nezperce National forest, in Idaho county,
ollicials in the local office, of the forest were not
in a position to state,
ihat the district telephohe engineer of the forest
service at Missoula will test the wireless phone
in the field next summer with the view to making
it of practical purpose in all the forests of the
Missoula district.
It is the present plan of the service to in
stall six sets with a radius of twenty-five miles
each, while the other sets will have a radius of 100
miles each. The principal drawback to the wire
less telephone system is said to be the inability
at times to establish definite connection, but it
is the intention of the forest service to use the
wiieless sets only as auxiliaries to the wire sys
tem, and, therefore this difficulty will be easier
to overcome in this district than if the plan were
to rely upon the wireless telephone entirely.
* %
However, it is known
J
9
!
ORANGEVILLE BEST CITY SEEN
ON ENTIRE JOURNEY, AVERS
RETURNED SOLDIER.
Declaring that Orangeville is the best
city he has seen between Idaho county
and France and return, and that, al-1
though French girls are iffighty nice,
Idaho girls are much nicer, Sgt. Don.
C. Fisher returned to his home in
Orangeville late last week, after having
|
been fourteen months in overseas ser
vice.
Sergeant Fisher has written for the
Free Press the following pertaining to
his experiences in France:
By SGT. DON C. FISHER
The Graugeyille boys who are return
I ; U g from France are busy greeting their
I many friends and all state that Grange
ville is without doubt the best city that
they have seen in all their journey.
First Sgt. Harvey L. Vaughan and Don
C. Fisher are the first of the 116th en
gineers to arrive home and they tell
many interesting things of their trip
to the land of the great war, especially
of the training of new men who were
| sent over to fill therauks of the fight
ing units çf engineers.
The 116th engineers was designated
as the training regiment of engineers,
j and being the only one of its kind in
France, was called upon to do a great
| work, and at no time did the regiment
J fall down in performing its task.
| First Christmas Overseas
Sergeant Fisher has the menu of tho
first Christmas dinner that was served
to the men who were left with the
company on Dec. 25, 1917 at Locourtinc.
It is as follow's:
Merry Christmas
DINNER
December 25, 1917
Co. E 116th Engrs.
Boast Turkey
Dressing
Potatoes
Brown gravy
Coffee
Bread
Marmalade
Mince Pie
Nuts
Fruit
Cigars
Prom this place we moved to the city
of Angers, this was the beginning of
the training camp.
written in
celebration of our first six months in
The following poem was
France:
Whenever you meet an engineer
Just mark the beggar well,
Choke back a sob, dry a tear,
That man has been through hell.
[f he rode the Tenadores,
Or tho good ship Mallory.
£> 0 n]] you can for that brave man
He needs your sympathy.
Oh, don't you remember
That day of Thanksgiving,
I
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SGT. DON C. FISHER
The day we all waited with glee
When we gave our thanks
The celebration of first six months in
France
To the Maker as we should
And gave to the sea all of our food?
The cranberry sauce
Got upset in the kitchen,
The turkey fell out on tho floor.
But we ate what we could,
And considered it good,
And went hack for more.
And don't you remember
The smell of the kitchen,
The sickening roll of the sea,
The slippery floor
Where you spilled all of your dinner
Of liver, onions and tea?
The liver was bum,
The onions were slimy
The tea was bitter as gall,
But the smell, just a whiff
Of it murdered a sea gull,
The smell was the worst of it all.
Oh, when the kaiser's dead boys
We'll still have work before us.
We'll burn the H. R. Mallory
And sink the Tenadores.
Then we will pass the hat around
And buy some of the latest books
To find the latest cuss words
With which to cuss the nigger cooks.
Then we will hit the trail for
Home Sweet Home and the
Girl we left behind us.
We will name the first kid Mallory
And the other Tenadores.
When the news of the sinking of the
Tenadores was heard by the boys great
was their rejoicing.
Many Changes Among Boys
When the boys return many changes
will be seen by the folks at home. Es
pecially along the lino of eating. All
have become good feeders and will reg
the Divorce Court
WILLIAM I. BADER ASKS DECREE
FROM GIRL HE WEDDED
AT CAMP
».
William K. Bader, an Idaho county
soldier, who recently returned from
France, has filed in the district ■ourt
suit for divorce from Clara U. F ider,
his wife, whom he married on Jur ■ 19,
1918, while he was in the militari ser
vice.
The complaint states th.v the couple
lived together from June If, ft> July 1,
when the soldier bridegroom was trails
ferred "rom California to Fort Sill,
Okla., and later he was sent to France.
He received his .mal dischrago on Fob
ruary 18.
The husband asserts that from June
19 to Oct. 1, 1918 his bride received
$15 monthly from his pay as a soldier,
and that, in addition she received an
allotment of $15 monthly from the gov
ernment. -he allotment afterward was
increased until the bride received in all
$40 a mouth. The complaint further
says the husband provided his bride
with a home with his parents at Pull
man, Wn.
The complaint alleges adultery on the
part of the bride, naming three men, and
further says that the bride gave away
to other men money she received as
compensation during the absence of her
husband in the army.
"At many tipies, " says the com
plaint, sho "conducted herself as a
lewd and lascivious woman."
Scheel vs. Scheel
Nell E. Scheel of Stites has filed ac.
tion for divorce from her husband, Aug
ust E. Scheel, alleging cruel and inhu
man treatment. The couple was mar
ried April 7, 1910 at Poison, Mont. The
plaintiff asks custody for six months out
of the year of their minor child, and
would let the husband have the child the
other six months. She also wants such
other relief as the court may deem prop
er.
Foster vs, Foster.
Cassie Foster, through her attorney,
brings action for divorce from Charles
C. Foster. They were married at Cape
Fair, Mo., "on or about" Dec. 10, 1910,
and have no children. Non-support is
alleged.
The complaint says the husband has
failed to provide the wife with the com
mon necessities of life, "because of
his idleness, profliganc.y and dissipa
tion."
Mrs. Foster wants her maiden name,
Cassie Bolen, restored.
BLAIR HOAR RENOMINATED
Blair ft. Hoar, receiver of the U. 8.
land office at Lewiston, and well
known to many Idaho county residents,
particularly those who have hid busi
ness with tho land office, 1ms been re
nominated for the receivership by
President Wilson.
TAKEN TO OBOFINO
Edward Hanley, of Cottonwoo*., an
insane person, who has been in custody
of Sheriff Eller, was on Saturday tak
en by the sheriff to the state asylum
for insane at Orofino.
INFLUENZA IN SCHOOLS
The third and fourth gradei of the
public schools are closed, followiu tho
outbreak of influenza among a few
pupils in the rooms.
ister no kicks but eat whatever is plac
ed before them. Girls, one thing about
soldiers who spent the winter in Prance
is that each has learned the gentle art
of carrying on a flirtation. This does
not apply to top sergeants, however.
They never. If you dßubt this state
ment just ask Top Sgt. Harvey Vaughn.
Many of the people are anxious to
see the return of the boys to our city
in order to see how Jack Edwards and
Gib Eimers will greet each other after
being absent for nearly tw T o years.
An amusing story is told of one of
the southern ladies in regard to what she
should cook if she should have a bunch
She
of soldier boys up to dinner,
thought that they would like chicken,
but the dear lady was informed that if
she really wanted to make, a hit with
the boys to bake waffles or hot cakes.
She said: "Oh, I mean what would
they like for dinner!
The reply was: "Waffles three times
a day,»' and from all accounts it is
about right.
I f

ORANGEVILLE SOLDIERS ARE NOW AE
CAMP DIX, N. L EXPECTED 10 ARRIVE
NOM W THIN ABOUT THREE WEEKS
HUNDRED SIXTEENTH ENGINEERS LAND SAFELY
FROM BATTLESHIP KANSAS, AFTER HAVING
BEEN DELAYED AT BERMUDY; BOYS SEND HOME
TELEGRAMS ADVISING RELATIVES OF ARRIVAL
*
Company E will be home soon.
Orangeville's own company in the war against German
autocracy landed Sunday afternoon in New i'ork city, from
the battleship Kansas, and now is stationed at Camp Dix, N. .1.
At Camp Dix the units which just arrived on American soil
will be segregated by states, and sent to divisional depots for
final discharge.
The voyage from Brest was stormy, and the Kansas was
obliged to put in at Bermuda for coal. The Kansas brought
KEMP SEES BIG MONEY
IN RAISING OF SHEEP
HAS CONFIDENCE IN FUTURE AND
GOES IN ON DEAL INVOLV
ING $36.000
Expressing belief that the future
holds great things in store for sheep
men, Len W. Kemp, well-known stock
man of Forest, in Orangeville Wenes
duy, declared he had this thought in
mind when ho and two associates pur
chased the Platt Bros, sheep outfit, on
Salmon river*» for $35,000.
The purchase was made by Mr.
Kemp, O. C. Keane and C. E. Bettln
son. The purchase includes 1200 acres
of deeded land, 2100 head of sheep,
and leases on 3000 acres of range.
Mr, Kemp sold his ranch near Orange
ville to Otto C. Nail. He and his part
ner, Cecil Rock, will hold a closing out
sale on the ranch. Mr. Rock, who has
been in the service, is prevented by ill
ness from engaging in farming in the
near future.
FRANK O. COWLING IS DEAD.
Well-known Farmer Succumbs, Follow
ing Influenza.
Prank C. Cowling, a well-known
Camas Prairie farmer, died Monday in
his homo ten miles north of Orange
ville. Death resulted from pneumonia,
following Spanish Influenza .
Mr. Cowling was aged 35 years. He
was born in Indian Territory, now a
part of the state of Oklahoma, and
when 3 years old removed with parents
to Clearwater.
Surviving him are his widow, Mrs.
Effie Cowling, two children, his mother,
two brothers, Dan, of Clearwater, and
Otto, of Orangeville, and a sister, Mrr.
Alfred Legsworth, of Asotin, Wn.
Funeral services were held Joday, the
Rev. J. B. York officiating. Burial was
at Clearwater.
MBS SHEPHERD, RIGGINS. DIES.
Wife of Oarage Man Succumb« After
Short Illness.
Mrs. Mary Shepherd, wife of O. C.
Shepherd, proprietor of the garage at
Riggins, died Friday of last week,
after an illness of brief duration. Mrs.
Shepherd was aged 50 years. She is
survived by her husband and several
grown children by a former marriage.
The children reside in Denver, Colo.
The body was sent to Chadron, Neb.,
for burial. A. J. Maugg, Orangeville
undertaker, was called to Riggins in
connection with the death.
WARRENS,
GOLD STRIKE AT
3-foot Ledge Uncovered in Old Min
ing Property.
Reports have been received by the
foreet service in Orangeville of the
discovery, recently, of a 3-foot ledge
of coarse gold-bearing ore in an old
mine at Warrens. Tho discovery was
made by Prank Martin.
Marvin Squibb has been honorably
discharged from the army and ha* re
turned to hie home here.
1980 officers and men, comprising the
116th engineer regiment and headqupi
fers motor battalion, headquarters bore
battalion, headquarters medical de
tachment, and companies A, B, C, and
D of the M6fh ammunition train.
Company I 1 oc seen fourteen months'
overseas service. Before departure for
France, the Second Idaho regiment, of
which Company B was a> member, was
merged with the 116th U. S. engineers,
and has since been identified with that
organization, •
FARM BUREAU MEETS FAVOR.
Farmers Urge Commissioners to Ap
propriété Money.
The Orangeville local of the Idaho
County Farm bureau was organized
Monday at a meeting held in the Odd
Fellows' hall.* A number of farmers
were present to listen (o Lt. K. K. Qrou
inger, representing tho U. 8. department
of agriculture and the University of
Idaho. Lieutenant Groninger explained
the workings of the farm bureau.
Officers of the local were elected as
follows:
President—George A. Cowgill.
Vice President'— G. F. Schleier.
Secretary— J. B. Carter.
The. following resolution was adopt
ed:
Whereas, the entire group of farmers
present at this meeting arc in favor
of the farm bureau and county agent
work therefore,
Be it resolved, That wo urge the
county commissioners of Idaho county
to make the necessary appropriation
to support a county agent for Idaho
county in cooperation with the U. 8.
department of agriculture and the state
of Idaho agricultural extension depart
ment.
GEORGE A. OOWOILL,
J. B. CARTER,
G. F. SCHLEIER,
Committee.
An enthusiastic meeting was held
Tuesday at Harpster, when a resolu
tion was adopted urging the commis
sioners to make the necessary appro
priation for tho farm bureau work.
Meeti'i-js, at which Lieutenant
Groninger will be present, have been
scheduled as follows:
Greenereek, Monday, March 3, 1:30.
Ferdiinud, Tuesday, March 4, 1:30.
Westlal o, Wednesday, March 5, 1:30.
Keuterville, Thursday, March 6, 1:30.
Cottonwood, Friday, March 7, 1:30.
Penn, Monday, March 10, 1:30.
Lake, Tuesday, March 11, 1:30,
Wlhifobird, Wednesday, March 12.
U. S. REVENUE MAN COMING.
Will Be Here to Confer With Public
On Revenue Tax.
h. 6 .
V vill arrive in Orangeville ou
Sunday and ,wi]I be located at the
court .house, where he can be con
sulted without charge.
Collector W. C. Whaley, is sending
one of his deputies to Orangeville
solely to help people in this vicinity
determine their individual liability and
to comply wth the law's requirements
os to 1918 incomes.
His office hours will bo from 9 a.
m. to 12 m. and from l p. m. to 6 p.
m., each day and he will remain in towu
until the close of business on Tues
day.
Rt venue collector J. Y.

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