OCR Interpretation


Idaho County free press. [volume] (Grangeville, Idaho Territory) 1886-current, March 13, 1919, Image 1

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091100/1919-03-13/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

Ten Company E Boys Will Be Home Saturday Night
IDAHO COUNTY FREE PRESS
DEVOTED TO THE BEST INTERESTS OF ORANGEVILLE AND IDAHO COUNTY
VOL. 33, NO. 43
ORANGEVILLE, IDAHO. THURSDAY. MARCH 13, 1919
$1.50 THE YEAR
STAGE DRIVER
OF WEST
COVERS DISTANCE OF MORE THAN
ELEVEN TIMES AROUND
WORLD
NOW HE'S QUIT FOR GOO
Never Again, Declares Beardy, as He
Lays Down Reins After 22
Years on One Job
After having driven the Salmon river
stage for almost twenty-two years, dur
which time he has driven a dis
tance equal to more than eleven times
the circumference of the earth at the
equator, Arthur (Beardy) Dunham,chain
pion stage driver of the olden days of
the west and also of the new, has quit,
his job, and now he confesses that he is
so nearly lost that he does not know
what to do with himself.
No more, asserts Dunham, woll he
ever drive stage over the hills and
through the canyons of Idaho county,
ing
for he is through for good—absolutely,
now and forever more.
Oldest Driver in West
In point of continuous service on one
stage line, Dunham is believed to be the
oldest stage driver in the entire west.
And popnla
Dunham, by reason of his jovial dispo
sition and long period as stage driver
in central Idaho, is known and remem
bered by travelers in all parts of the
country.
-Well, I guess sa. Beardy
Wealthy mining men from the east,
financiers, government and state offi
cials, stockmen, cowpunchers, young
tenderfeet from the east who have come
west in search of fortune, and who even
tually settled down to a rancher 's life
in the Salmon river country, 'school
ma'ams, ranchers' wives, and ranchers'
sweethearts who afterward became
their wives, and ranchers' daughters,
all have ridden on Beardy Dunham 's
stage, and not one among the thuosauds
upon thousands he has transported into
the Salmon river country, or hauled
from that section to Garngeville, will
fail to remember Beardy Dunham to his
dying day.
. Popular with the Ladles
"I always was especially popular
with the school ma'ams," said Bear
dy, the other day. I drove stage out of
Grangeville three times avweek, while
another man drove the other three days,
and the school ma'ams always waited
for my stage. I wouldget one of them
on the driver's seat with me, and how
we would talk. Foolish questions? You
betcha, and answers entirely in keeping
with the questions, would they get.
Beardy Dunham drove the first stage
into the town of WJhitebird. For five
years he drove a Concord stage, and the
other years he drove a light wagon.
"I distinctly remember the last trip
I made with the old Concord,'' declared
Beardy, with a hearty laugh. "I was
driving six horses and had twelve pas
> I .
sengers, a number of whom were wo
men.
ched on top of the stage and six were
inside. One of the men was an expert
fiddler, and as we turned into Orange
ville, I whipped up the horses and drove
down Main street on the dead run. The
man with the fiddle was fiddling with
all his might and the passengers were
all singing or yelling as loudly as they
could. It was a great trip, and surely
made an impression on the people oi
Orangeville. That night I discarded
the Concord, and the next morningaj
Six of the passengers were per
booked up to a stage similar to those
now in use.
n
He's an Expert Horseman
No better horseman exists in the west
than Beardy Dunham, 'tie said. For
many years ho drove down Whitebird
canyon, liekety cut, without a stop for
anything. Rocks and other obstructions
in the road didn't make any difference
to him. It was get there on time, for be
sides passengers, he carried Uncle Sam 's
mail and the express.
It will be twenty-two years next July
when Beardy first took the reins on the
Salmon river stage line, and he has been
driving four and six horses over tho
rocky road from Orangeville to the Sal
mon river ever since.
Ou the job?
ham, , during the
} ears he handled the reins, has scarce
ly lost a trip. The tirst eight years he
drove from Orangeville to Whitebirn
and return, making a round trip every
day, six days of the week,
all those eight years, Beardy Dunham
did not lose more than eight days, and
those eight days were lost because of
illness.
Always. Beardy Dun
entire twenty-two
And in
Dunham drove during those
eight years -or L. L. Gordon.
Entering the employ of Freeman &
Brown, fourteen Vears ago, Beardy Dun
ham has driven from Orangeville to Lu
eile and return, making three round
trips a week, with a Monday layover
in Orangeville. He would drive to Lu
eile, distance of forty-one miles, in
one day, and would return the next.
Drives Days and Nights
Driving days, and Qiten late into the
night, only to arise at 5 o'clock on the
following morning, ready to start anew
on his trip, Dunham, in the twenty-two
years he has driven stage on the Sal
mon river line, has driven a total dis
tance of more than eleven times around
the world a' the equator. He computes
this distance as follows:
Eight years between Orangeville and
Whitebird, a distance of twenty miles,
one round trip a day, six days a week,
97,840.
Fourteen years between Orangeville
and Lucile, a distance of forty-one
miles, three round trips a week, 175,448.
Total number of miles driven 273,288.
Circumference of earth at equator, 24,
000 miles.
MULHALL ASKS VENUE
CHANCE TO LEWISTON
IN BIG DAMAGE CASE
WOULD HAVE TRIAL IN NEZ
PERCE COUNTY—DENIES
HITTING WOMAN
William Mulhail, former Idaho coun
ty stockman, who recently was made de
fendant in a $20,000 damage case filed
in the district court of Idaho county by
Effic M. Newman, has filed motion for
change of venue from Idaho to Nez
Perce county. Mr. Mulhail says that,
inasmuch as he is now and at the com
mencement of the action was a resident
of Nez Perce county, the case should
be tried there.
Mr. Mulhail denies that,, while Effie
M. Newman was in his employ, at his
ranch-near Denver, he hit her, as alleg
ed, and caused her to fall against a door
or door casing, thereby causing injur
ies ftom which she was obliged to un
dergo a surgical operation, as alleged
in the complaint.
Mr. Mulhail, however, states that
plaintiff, without cause, excuse or pro
vidently abusive,
vocation, became
threatening and aggressive toward this
defenadnt and toward members of his
family and assulted this defendant and
threatened the members of his family,
and theerupon this edfendnt, in edfense
of himself and the defense of his wife
and children, and in resistance of the
abuse, threats, assaults and aggressions
of the plaintiff, laid his hnd upbn the
plaintiff with so much force as was nec
to resist the plaintiff and to de
cssary
fend and protect this defendant and the
members of his family.'
asserts that he "did no injury of any
kind whatsoever, physical or mental, to
Mr. Mulhail
the plaintiff."
The defendant has filed a demurrer
reciting that the complaint does not
state _facs sufficient to
for action against the defendant.
constitute
cause
FINDS HIS BROTHER'S GRAVE
Edward Long Locates Resting Place of
Lt. John A. Long
Commissioner
Edward Long, son of
and Mrs. John D. Long, of Grangeville,
has found the grave of his brother,
Lt. John A. Long, who was slain in
The grave is in the
battle in France.
Argonnc forest.
In a letter to his parents, Edward
Long writes of finding the grave:
"I marked it as best I could, find
ing a large square steel can, and I fil
led it half full of brick and imbedded
it bottom side up* a head stone, and
put a board enclosure around it.
I am ready to go back. They can't
send me out of the country any too
Now
»»
fast.
TÄTIS
Up Telephone Ppk
*c !»r
BUD YATES SEVERELY BURNED
ON FACE AND LEO BY
ELECTRICITY
Unconscious, and with one foot
caught between a wire and a cross
bar, while his body dangled from the
top of a telephone pole, Bud Yates,
son of Lee Yates, a prominent rancher
residing near Orangeville, was rescu
ed Tuesday morning only after com- |
panions hud placed a ladder against
the pole and, climbing up, extricated
his foot from the trap which held it,
and prevented his falling almost thir
ty feet to the ground. The accident
occurred near the Kd Hiles place, on
the Denver road.
Yates, who was stringing a tele
phone line on the pole, was knocked
unconscious by current from u high
voltage electric wire, which w'as at
tached to the pole on which he was
working. He was suddenly hurled
from his position on the pole, and in
falling, his foot became entangled be
tween a wire and cross bar.
The young man suffered a serious
burn on one side of the face and one
leg was badly burned from contact
with the electric wire. Dr. Q. S.
Stockton, who was called, said that
Yates would recover.
SURPRISE PARi i FOR I. E. ZUVER
Auctioneer Is Reminded Day Is His
Birthday Anniversary
popular Orangeville
1. E. Zuver,
auctioneer and proprietor of the Sil
ver grill, was the victim of a cleverly
arranged surprise party on Friday
evening of last week, at the Silver
grill. On invitation of Mrs. Zuvér, a
number of men, friends of Mr. Zuver,
gathered around a banquet table, and
Mr. Zuver was asked to be one of the
guests. He was not aware that the ban
quet w T as in bis honor until the visit i
stood to toast him, and when he atten.
pted to rise to his feet, they ordered
him to retain his seat.
TWO DEATHS AT COTTONWOOD
B. Gelse and Miss Margaret Lies Are
Summoned
Two deaths occurred Wednesday in
Cottonwood.
old.
Miss Margaret Lies, 19 years
died Wednesday morning as a result of
Spanish influenza. She is survived by
her parents and several brothers and
sisters.
B. Geise, 76, a retired farmer, died
Wednesday ,afternoon.
A. J. Maugg, Grangville funeral dir
ector, was called to Cottonwood by
reason of the deaths.
<$>
<$> DOE GIVES BIRTH TO
21 RABBITS; TYPICAL ♦
ROOSEVELT FAMILY <•>
<$>
<t>

<?>
A Roosevelt family of rab- <$
<$> bits made its appearance in. a
<$> hutch at the Jack Warren home <$>
•$> in Grangeville this week. Of <$>
<$> the twenty-one young rabbits, <î>
<$> twenty are alive. Local rabbit <?>
■$> fanciers declare this litter is the <$>
<8>
<& largest known here.
<$>
DELEGATION
Mount Idaho lodge No. 9, A. F. &
A. M., celebrated the payment of the
mortgage on the Masonic building
Tusday night, with a full attendance
of the brethren, by burning its mort
gage and putting three initiates to the
Master ^lason degree.
A large delegation of brethren from
Prairie lodge No. 75, Vollmer, parti
cipated in the festivities and assisted
in the initiation work, winding up with
a splendid banquet, the proceedings
were accompanied by an address by
the Hon. A. F. Parker, who gave a his
tory of the lodge from the date of its
institution at Mount Idaho, in Janu
y
will RUSH ROAD
f(j(|fl ({£[>[ fQ
L
ID
f
STATE HIGHWAY COMMISSION
DECIDES ON WORK
FOR 1919
LEGISLATORS RETURN HOME
Worked Hard for Money for Roads in
Idaho County and Brought
Back the Bacon
The North and South highway liuk
between Orangeville and Now -Mead
ows will be rushed to completion this
The state highway commission
-* a meeting held Wedues
year,
so decided
day.
Idaho county» will-benefit tremendous
ly through road work to be doue with
in the next year, in the opinions of
State Senator N. B. i'ettiboae and Rep
resentative Seth D. Joues, who were in
Orangeville this (veek euro ate to then
homes, following adjournment of the
statu legislature, last Saturday.
Senator Fettiboue aud Representative
Jones, asiwell as Representative Sch
roder and all north Idaho members of
the legislature, worked during the en
tire session for good roads, and as a re
su,t bi ff appropriations were granted
for road work in norfh iadho.
Idaho county received $283,000 for
the North and South highway, and it
is stipulated that on the section of the
road lying between Whitebird and the
intersection of the Smith Fork with the
main Weiser river, local cooperation in
the raising of funds is not required.
Since little taxable land is to bo found
in this part of the country, local aid
would be almost impossible.
Idaho county also receives $48,000
state aid for the Lewis and Clark high
way.
BOYS, GET YOUR EXTRA PAY!
Free Press Will Give Blank Forms to
All Applicants
Idaho county soldiers and sailors who
have been discharged from the service
without receiving the $60 extra pay to
which they are entitled, may procure
blanks free of charge from the Free
Press, on which to make aplication for
extra qay.'
Blanks have been prepared and will
be given or mailed to all applicants.
Soldiers and sailors who in the future
are discharged will receive the $6o ex
tra pay at (he time of their discharge.
However, those who previously left the
army or navy must make application
for the bonus.
COMPANY E IS AT FORT LOGAN
Local Soldiers Reach Colorado on Way
Home
Company E of Orangeville arrived
last Friday at Fort Dogan. Colo. The
company is on its way home. When
the boys will be discharged from the
j
I
service has not been made clear, but
it is believed they will he home soon.
f
OF VIMS HERE
ary, 1873, by Sewell iruax, of Walla
Walla, under dispensation from the
grand lodge of Idaho. The duty of
burning the mortgage devolved upou
Mr- Parker, treasurer of the lodge for
twenty-one successive years, following
a few remarks appropriate to the oc
casion.
A number of addresses were also de
livered during I he banquet by the Voll
mer visitors, all of whom expressed
their appreciation of the hospitality
of the local lodge, and at 3 a. m., the
brethren adjourned, after a celebration
marked by enthusiasm for the princi
ples of this great fraternity.
e x tra !
TEN MEMBERS OF COMPANY E
HAVE ARRIVED IN LEWISTON AND
I WILL BE IN ORANGEVILLE SAT
URDAY NIGHT. THEY ARE:
NEIL ER8KINE
ALBERT GUTHRIE
. CHARLES TURNER
JACK EDWARDS
ALONZO BROWN
GEORGE SWANK
LLOYD LEACH
RALPH SCHWARZ
ALLIE BEA i ON
DICK FEA8TER
SGT. MACK GREGG WILL ARRI
VE EARLY NEXT WEEK
SENTENCED TO PENITENTIARY
Man Who Wronged Girl Gets Five to
Ten Years in Prison
•lames Potts, of Bates, who was ta
ken by Sheriff Eller and Prosecuting
Attorney Auger to Lewiston, last Fri
day, pleaded guilty before Judge Sca
les of the district court, to a statutory
charge, and as sentenced to from five
to ten years in the penitentiary. Potts
wronged a girl at Stites.
Lee Woodworth pleaded guilty to for
gery. He agreed to refund the money
he obtained by forging a check, and
was placed on suspended sentence. Ho
already had served two months in the
county jail here.
Reilley Skowl, of Lewiston, the boy
who broke into the Alexander-Frei
denrich store in Orangeville, was pla
ced on probation by the probate court
of Nez Perce county. He also had
broken into business houses in Lewis
ton.
Survey to Soon Be
Made from Koosfyia
to Grangeville
ROAD WILL BE DIRECT, AND NOT
BY WAY OF HABPSTBE,
IS REPORT
The state highway engineer is soon
to make a survey of the proposed road
between Grangeville and Kooskiu, ac
cording to apparently reliable informa
tion received by the Free Prss. It also
is reported to be authoritative that he
thence to Orangeville, but, in thu face
of recent reports receive! here, i' ap- |
CHANGB IN BANK AT WHITEBIRD
survey will be made from Kooskin 'o
Stites, and thence direct to Grange
ville. This would leave Harpster off the
surveyed route. A movement has been
in progress to have the route designa
ted by way of the South Pork of the
Clearwater river to Hgrpstu.-, and
pears that Harpster is to be excluded
from the route.
Nail Elected Cashier to Succeed A. L.
Donaldson
Mr.
At a recent directors' meeting of the
Balinqjf river State bank at Whitebird,
Otto C. Nail was elected cashier and A.
L. Donaldson, who has been cashier and
manager of the bank for the last eight
years, was elected a vice president.
Mr. Donaldson will reelaso active con
nection with the bank April 1, but will
retain his interests in the bank.
Nail will take active charge on April 1.
Mr. Nail is a man of wide banking
experience in this state and in Wash
ington. He at one time was associated
with the Bank of Camas Prairie.
Mr. Donaldson has plans for other
banking connections. He is a man of
seasoned banking experience and no
doubt will soon be back in the game.
New officers of the bank are:
President— F. W. Kettenbach,
j Vice president—George Behean.
I Cashier— O. C. Nail.
IDAHO COUNTY HAS 30 AT "U"
Total Enrollment at University of Ida
ho Is 990
Idaho county, on Nov. 23, 1918. had
twenty students at the University of
Idaho, according to a table just made
public by Dean J. G. Eldridgc, of the
university. Idaho county student* a'
the university during tho college year
1916-17 numbered thirteen, and in 19
17-18, fourteen. Toial enrollment at
the university on November 22 waa
990, of whom 836 wen residents of
the state of Idaho. Total enrollment
in 1916-17 was 713, aud in 19 1 7 18, 801.
MISSION Of CiRCH
REV. J. A. PINE EXPLAINS THE
RESPONSIBILIT i OF CHRIST
IAN PEOPLE
MANY QUESTIONS ARE ASKED
Followers of christ Must Become Lead
ers in All Vital Interests, Says
Preacher
By Rev. .1. A. Pine
In these days of uq^est and change,
one of the topics of national vital in
terest is the church. What shall the
churches l>e and do in the future?
The world is recognizing, us never be
fore, perhaps the essential and vital
function of the church as a bulwark
of the moral and righteous life of the
nation. The working ideals of our lib
erties, our democracy, and our pence
must be interpreted by the Teacher
of Christianity. But Christianity it
self will always be interpreted by the
lives of its adherents. The church is
as strong or as weak as the humanity
that constitutes it. If Jesus, the
Christ, is to be the leader of the world
in the twentieth century, Ho must
have the superme control of the live*
of the members of His lardy, .the
of the members of His body, the
will pass muster in this matter. In
the days that are coming, the man or
woman who is not willing to accept
the responsibilities and conclusions of
the Christian faith in his life will be
counted against Christ, whether he be
a churchmember or not. He will be
branded the thief of slackers, who
believes the teachings of Christ "and
(he Bible, and yet is unwilling, for
any reason, to put them to practice.
Questions Asked of Church
Today the world, Christian and pag
an, is turning to the church in a ques
tioning attitude. Her best friends are
in deep solicitude whether the church
Of Christ possepeea the strength tof
faith, and courage of conviction, the
unselfishness of service, the unity
of faith, and the life essential and
necessary to speak out the great mor
al, industrial and political issues of
the day. Will she undertake the re
sponsibilities of leadership in all the
vital interests of our time? In other
words, the followers of Christ fnust
"go oxer (he top'' in the battle oi
righteousness. It is not that the
church shall forget her divinely ap
pointed tasks in the salvation of souls
and the building of individual Christ
ian character, but the interpretation
of these in all vital elements of every
day life. The church has no temporal,
jiolitical rights or privileges of any
kind. She • has never had any such
rights. The most dangerous and re
pulsive of all evils, both for the state
and the church, herself, would be the
assumption of anything of that kind.
But the church does have the right to
the moral leadership of the world.
She does have the right to speak out.
her declarations of what is right and
Christian in all the political, social
and industrial questions and interests
of the time. If the followers of
Christ are doing the things He tells
them to do, they will be inevitably ex
pressing their Christian standards of
righteousness and human sympathy in
business and industrial laws and in
social and political reforms.
Must Speak in Unison
But if the church expect« to be
heard in the great issues that stir the
passions of men, she must speak out
with one voice. Through jangling,
contention and unholy divisions of a
denominational partisan church life,
the church of Christ has lost her pow
er to speak to the needs of the world.
Standards of Christian life have been
lowered; in many quarters men have
turned in disgust and contempt from
her; the very sincerity of the claims
of the church is doubted: and doubt
as to the truth of Christianity is found
this Christian era
everywhere,
men ami women have betrayed their
In
Issues of secondary, or scarce
Lord.
ly no importance, have been raised in
False issues have received
the church.
(Continued on Page 3)

xml | txt