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Idaho County free press. [volume] (Grangeville, Idaho Territory) 1886-current, September 25, 1924, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091100/1924-09-25/ed-1/seq-4/

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IDAHO COUNTY FREE PRESS
A Weekly Newspaper
Founded June 18, 1886
E. M. OLMSTED, Publisher
Entered as second-class mail mat
ter at the postoffice in Orangeville,
Idaho. Subscription price, to be
paid in advance, $1.50 yearly. Of
ficial newspaper of Idaho county.
For Sale and Want Ads
Per line each week _ _
Locals to be mixed with
Reading matter per line
Obituaries per line _ _
Card of Thanks _ _ .
_ . .05
. . . .10
. . , .05
- . 1.00
Member Idaho Editorial Association.
THE ELECTION AND BUSINESS
We believe the
American people
are capable of attending to the mat
ter of electing a president this fall
and still attending to their business ;
for 'inertia in
Wheth
that the usual alibi
business will not hold good,
er the people want a change of ad
ministration or whether they want to
leave things ns they are, there cer
for our letting
tainly is no excuse
down the bars of inactivity in ourj**
commercial relationshij)s and In our
dally work.
We should all work as hard as we
vote. This will keep the wheels of
progress moving. The very fact that
there is a traditional slump in busi
ness during presidential election
years should stimulate us on to
greater efforts.
SUPPORT GRANGEVILLE
More and more is competition
teaching out to devour, either hon
estly or dishonestly, all within- its
grasp. This is true of cities, towns
and villages. Cities and towns now
advertise the same as business ad
vertises. Perhaps not altogtber by
the same methods, but they advertise.
The fact that a business advertises
shows that it is in a field of competi
tion. The doctrine of the survival of
the fittest takes hold; and right
now in the United States we are pass
ing Into the era of strong competi
tion between various sections of the
country, and between cities, towns,
and communities. A healthy condi
tion, and ns for such competition we
might say that it is the very life of I
our national growth. But this calls
for an added zeal and devotion to J
our own community, and to our local I
merchants and lines of business.
Almost a new patriotism arises,
which calls for a wholesome and |
united effort on the part of the ci
tizens of Grangeville to buy at home,
to save at home ,to work at home;
to build up the home community and
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Clothes
Practice
Economy
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As you glace about, it is
easy to distinguish the well
dressed men—the men whose
clothes are custom tailored
from goods of beautiful, rich
and pure wool quality.
If you are wearing that
kind, it is a wonderful satis
faction. If you are not, let us
remind you that you can if
you will but determine to do
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Custom Tailored
Clothes
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cost no more than the less desirable
kind.
Our absolutely 100 per cent all
wool fabrics, in more than a hundred
patterns, ctdor effects and weaves,
arc available for your own choice,
which we will be pleased to make up
for yon into a stylish, perfect-fitting
custom tailored suit to your measure.
W
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We welcome you to look
over these new Fall and Win
ter fabrics
W. J. SOLTMAN
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Better Quality Clothes
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then see to it that It keeps built tip.
We heard of a town that had as its
slogan, "Watch It Grow." A better
"Help It
|
slogan would have been,
Grow."
REDUCE CROSSING ACCIDENTS
A current report to the Intel-state
Commerce Commission shows a per
centage reduction of crossing acci
dents of a certain great railway
system to be 8.1 per thousand regis
tered automobiles for six months
compared with six months of last
year. This is yet 01.9 too many.
Casualty lists of grade crossings,
coming by "bits" and in different
sections of the country, do not seem
so appalling; but when lumped they
compare "favorably" with five cas
ualty lists of war.
When we can reduce carelessness
we can reduce crossing accidents.
When we increase the efficiency of
automobile drivers, raise the stand
ards for qualification ns drivers, and
ien come aa nearly as possible el
iminating all grade crossings, we will
reduce carelessness, or at least help
to prevent it
It is a problem both in mathemat
ics and in morals. The railroads,
too, must come in for their share of
responsibility, but that does not re
lieve the rest of us from our duty of
being careful and of protecting the
lives of those in our car.
WHY SHOULD YOU TAKE
YOUR HOME PAPER?
For the post several months coun
try editors all over the United States
have been explaining in the Publish
era* Auxiliary,- which is the newspa
per's newspaper,
the reasons why
people who live In a community should
subscribe , for, and support the home
paper. One of the shortest and best
lg printed below, it is from Will C.
Carson, publisher of tbe Greenville,
(Ill.) Advocate.
"There are Innumerable reasons
why the people of this commun
ity should subscribe for the
Greenville Advocate. Here are
just a few of them :
1. This newspaper gives the
news of its field and the fact
that it has a circulation of more
than 3,000 paid in advance, in a
county of only 16,000 population,
is indicative that the people are
appreciative of its efforts in pre
senting the news in a readable
manner without fear or favor.
2. It is a constant booster for
all improvements that are for the
best interests of the community.
3. It is n consistent exponent
of clean journalism.
4. It prints the news in an un
biased manner and is free lance
editorially.
5. It spares no pains nor ex
pense to get the news accurate.
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6. It seeks first and foremost
to rentier a public service."
I While the editor of the Idaho Coun
j ty Free Press agrees with most
the points set forth above, yet, we
would like to add a few or our own.
The country newspaper rs a clear
ing house for not only the current
news of the communltj, nut is
medium of expression in all local sub
jects.
It is an absolute record of the legal
publications of your county and will
keep you informed in the matter of
births, deaths, marriages, etc.
The local newspaper Is worth many
times its price to you when you have
sales to offer or when you wish to
buy.
It keeps you informed as to the
progress of schools, churches lodges
and other community interests.
It is an unrivalled medium where
by the merchant con reach the buyer,
cheaply and quickly.
And last but not least the local
newspaper is the true index of the
particular environment in which yon
live.
In ninety-nine cases out of one
hundred, a stranger interested in your
town or neighborhood, comes in and
gets a copy of the local newspaper.
If it looks up-to-date, if It looks pros
perous, if it is well-filled with at
tractive home advertising ; his first
impression is of the right kind.
A country newspaper is recognized
by the postal department of our gov
ernment as a quasi-public institution.
It is hedged about by regulations and
reports second only to the local,bank
and was looked upon by the framers
of the constitution as one of the bul
warks of education, intelligence and
adancement
And, the price is within the reach
We invite you. if not
of everyone,
already one, to become a subscriber to
the Idaho County Free Press.
WHITEBIRD
Special Correspondent
Loren Lenon was operated on for
appendicitis Tuesday and is recover
ing. Dr. Orr, of Cottonwood, assisted
by Dr. G. S. Stockton, of Grangè
vllle performed the operation.
Harry Hagen and Milo Newman
arrived Saturday from Adams camp,
where they have been employed by
the forest service.
Mrs. Anna McMinnie was an ar
rival Sunday from Pomeroy, Wn.,
and is visiting her sister, Mrs. W. A.
Shuck.
A. W. Behrens, cashier of the Sal
mon River State bank made a trip
to Spokane Friday, returning Sunday.
Rev. J. G. Brugger, M. E. min
ister. has located at Whitebird and
will take the place of Rev. K. D. Os
who formerly came from
a
terhout,
Orangeville.
A very Interesting
shooting was held here Monday by
a representative of an ammunition
company.
E. B- Wilson and son, Frank, re
turned from Portland Tuesday, where
they were making a delivery of cat
exhibition of
tie.
left Monday
Mrs. Myra Caldwell
for Pullman. Wn., to enter the State
College of Washington.
W. W. White motored to Nezperce
He was accompanied by
Sunday.
Mrs. A. M. Reynolds and children.
JOSEPH
Special Correspondent
Mrs. James Aram and family^ are
visiting at Orangeville this week.
They attended the fair.
The Aram school will open Monday
Sept. 22. Miss Laura Flushiuger will
teach the school.
Mr. Wm. McDougall was a business
visitor in Whltebird Friday.
Adeline McCune is spending a few
Mrs. Wilson at Getta
Mrs. Wilson has been very
days with
creek.
sick, but is improving.
Jetta Lyda is staying a few days
on Getta creek with Mrs. Platt Tal
bott, Jr., while "Dottle" is helping
James Aram with his beef cattle.
A large number of cattle, sheep and
hogs were driven to market this week
from Joseph. Those driving herds
were: Lou Brust, Jim Aram, Price
Keener, Lee Keley, Jean Andrews.
Wm. McDougall, C. P. Miller, and
Wm. Graham.
Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Jones and Mr.
Flynn were visitors in Joseph last
week. Mr. Flynn recently purchased
a sawmill from Mr. Jones and plans
to saw some lumber this fall.
Jim Gilbane is operating his saw
mill this fall.
The Joseph school has purchased
a one-half Interest in the Flyblow
school piano. Glen Inglisb moved the
piano this week. -
Sam Jones, 'of Cottonwood creek,
who has been spending a few weeks
visiting his brother, Seth Jones, re
turned to his home last week.
RIGGINS
The rain in tbe
Riggins section
last week improved the fall range
C. M, Clay
trip to Boise.
Mr. and Mrs. Sanford Larson have
been the guests of
Conrad Buhl.
has made a business
Mr .and Mrs.
Misses Marie and Janie Bass ar
rived Sunday from Pocahontas, Ark.,
to make their home with their sister,
Mrs. Geo. Dennison.
A number of Riggins people at
tended the fair at Grangeville last
week.
Jack Howard took his beef cattle
to New Meadows for shipment lust
week. He was acompnnled by his
daughter, Lueile.
Miss Desllle Larson was the guest
of Mrs. Geo. Denison Saturday, and
Sunday.
British National Flag
Tbe "Union Jack," the national flag
of Great Britain, came into being in
1801. It la an amalgamation of the
banners of St. George, St. Andrew and
St. Patrick, representing the tBtee
united kingdoms.
Vld English Law
An old English law required all Eng
lish seaports and trading towns to con
tribue to the support of warships or
to build and equip such ships. The
law fell into disuse and was included
in the Petition of Right.
Bible Thoughts for
This Week
Sunday.
ALL IS WELL:—Let not your
heart he troubled ; ye believe In
God, believe also In me. In my
Father's house are many mansions
If it were not so, I would have toll
you. I go to prepare a place for
you.—John 14; 1, 2.
Monday,
WHY WILL YE DIE7—As I live
salth the Lord God, I have no pleas
ure in the death of the wicked. .
Turn ye, turn ye from your evil
ways: for why will ye die. O house
of Israel ?—Ezekiel 33: 11.
Tuesday.
PEACE WITH ALL MEN:—Fol
low peace with all men, and holi
ness, without which no man shall
see the Lord.—Hebrews 12; 14.
Wedneaday.
THE WAY TO PEACE:—Ac
quaint now thyself with Him, and
be at peace: thereby good shall
come unto thee.—Job 22: 21.
Thursday.
PROCLAMATION OF PEACE:—
Glory be to God in the highest, and
on earth peace, good will toward
men.—Luke 2: 14.
Friday.
REFUGE, STRENGTH. HELP:—
God is our refuge and strength, a
very present help In trouble.—Psalm
46: 1.
Saturday.
PERFECT PEACE:—Thou wilt
keep him In perfect peace, whose
mind is stayed on thee; because he
trusteth in th«e.—Isaiah 26: 3.
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Burton L. French
Will address the voters of Grangeville
at the I.O.O.F. Opera House
at 8:15 P.M.
Tuesday, Sept. 30
Lahmlad
If at last you are perauaded that all
thlnga in the world are rotten save
your precious self, you are a young in
tellectual.—Duluth Herald.
ON THE STREET
•y
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ts
"Brown says he's financially all In."
"Yes ; just told me he's every cent
out."
NEW AT THE WHEEL
S3
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ru.
Motorist (tooting horn)—Hey, there ;
you wouldn't know a fog horn If you
heard onel
Pedestrian—Maybe so; but I know
a greenhorn at a glance!
, gT'"TW"~*^W| 13—K£-3—KEa—ETSSWPr"
JACK TIRES
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Have all the features of
Balloon tires without sacri
fice of side wall. Buy them
because they are better.
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MAKE RIDING A PLEAS
URE ON LOW PRESSURE
JACK CORDS.
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They carry approximately
twenty per cent less air than
other standard'tires thereby
prolonging the life of y° ul
car and reducing repair bill»
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Ask The Man Riding Them
Grangeville Service Station
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nmr-zamsz.
M. G. 4—H. CLUB
The M. G. 4-H. Club held the regu
lar business meeting at the home of
Mrs. Zumwalt immediately after
school Wednesday. Reports of work
accomplished at home by members
during the week were recorded by
the secretary. A general discussion
of fair prizes and money earned by
the girl's stand during the fair prov
ed the chief topic of the meeting.
A list of prizes received by club
members will be found on another
page of this issue.
The girls were pleased with the
specials from Cottonwood and the in
terest of Cottonwood business men in
the club.
A neat profit was made by the
club ice cream stand during the fair.
The profit was placed in a bank for
future use. The club wishes to ex
press gratitude to T. S. Jackson and
O. T. Lingo for aid given. Also to
the fair Association, the Model groc
ery, and all others who aided them
In their work.
Mr, Everly, the new club leader
in Grangeville for the fair. Mr.
has received
a scholarship and will accept it.
His loss is regretted by the girls.
While the girls have not succeeded
as they mean to yet, they have made
a creditable showing for their first
year's work. They had no county
agent to direct their work and f«l
that they have done well.
was
Stone, former leader,
Of all sad words that in memory
bum. The saddest are these, "I niove
we adjourn."

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