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The record. [volume] (St. Maries, Idaho) 1913-1918, February 12, 1918, Image 3

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I
SANTA NEWS NOTES
The Santa liramatic club pr«*
sented the niusic:«,! comedy
Rustic Romeo" befi>re two most
native audiiinres at Santa |
ev«Miing and it Feiii
SaAurday evening. The
school hall at Santa was
on Friday evening. The,
efforts were warmly app
all expressed their
at the exceptional
"A
appi
« * n _
wood *
large
fillç'U .«
players'
plamleil and
sal is fact i«»n
production by an amateur
pany. At Fernwood the play was
produced at the
church, which was
capacity and many were lï>rced
to go away, not being able to se
cure even standing room. The
product"»!* was oven more cap
ably enacted at Fernwou«! lhajt"fit
Santa. The cast includes
members who have been practrc- j
ing for six weeks ami the per
feclion of their work attests the i
com
Presbyterian I
tilloilH
t«>
I
earnestness with which they
have worked.
The club is
the purpose <>f securing
Cross funds. To date they have
IbarneR $ 155.20 for this purpose, j
The Santa Dramatic club
I
now organized for
Bed i
î_ s I
exporting to put on their comedy
"A Rustic Romeo" at Tensed on
Saturday, February I(>lh.
Mr. Sin it b and Miss Haverland
nf Bovill were down to attend the
play given here on Friday
ning. Mr. Smith was one of the
A Rustic
eve
characters
in
main
Romeo.'
Mr. T. H. liny and G. W. I.oaf
of St. Maries wore in the city
Monday.
of this oily
at Bovill
Mr. \V. Harkins
business visitor
was a
Saturday.
of Santa, who
high school
from
Wilbur 1 Molly
has been attending
in Spokane is
the spotted fever.
home Monday and is n«>w reeup
recovering
He returned
eral ing.
The family
,f B. R. Brel z have
their j
to !
moved inti
homestead
send their
from
here in order
school.
town
nen r
children I
j
UNCLE SAW! WANTS
WlANY ACCOUNTANTS
The United Slates Governuu
is in need of several hundred ex
to till va
perl cost accountants
caueies in tin* account section
the finance depart ment
equipment division
T-flTtlK War
_ilher branches,
»f
of the
uf flu* Signal
I lepart ment, and in
for duty in
A
Washington, 1>.
C., or in the
according to an announce
ileld,
ment just issu«*»l by the United
Civil Service Commission.
offered range from
Men
States
The salaries
$2.100 I.
only ar«> desired.
$ 6,000
i\ year.
of the appointees
The duties
Signal Corps will consist
if produc
f airplanes and air
either as super
to lb«
of the determination
Don costs
in« »tors,
charge at one or more
plane
visors in
of the several plants,
or as as—
appointees may 1»«?
sistanls;
signed to iluty in Washington,
or
as
D. C.
Applicants
semble«! for
lion, iiul will ho
subjects
perience, as
plications
deuce.
will not- be as
a written examina
[•ated upon the
education ami ex
shown by their ap
nii<I corroborative evi —
of
The fiommission slates that on
f the urgent needs of
account
the service applications for these
will be received until
posit ions
further notice
will be rated promptly and certi
the needs of
and Dial papers
llcalions made as
the service require.
Complete information and ap
plication blanks may be «»blained
by communicating with Die sec
retary of t lie local board of civil
at the post
service examiners
office in any of the larger cities
with the United States
Civil
nr
Washing
Commission,
Service
ton, D. G.
BAND WILL GIVE PLAY
NEXT FRIDAY, FEB. 15
"Follies of 1918" Is the Title of
Big Musical Comedy to be
Produced by Local Talent
at the Grand Theatre
the home
Friday
Preparations
talent show to he given
evening, Feb. 15th, for the bene
fit of the ïjt. Maries Band,
well imder way and the
of l,ÿa promises to he one of
IVhüI entertainments over
.^•u Maries.
\0mT. Merrill of San Francisco,
is busy with about 60 of the best
talent in town, and acknowledges
that he has seldom had as good
material. He says that by Friday
night they will be equal, if not
better, than many of the profes
sional troupes.
for
are
Follies
the
As the show is
for a good cause* ajid the abilities
iof SI. Maries amateur entertain
ers are so well known, it is ex
pected ;l packed house will greet
performers. Watch for fur
ther notice and don't forget the
dale. Friday, Feb. 15lh.
The Hand will donate one-half
■eceipts to the Ked Cross, so
turn out and help a good cause,
serve your seajs at the Anms
benefit and
«
the
the
p P
• re and avoid the rush at
(lirug St
t he door.
LUMBERMEN'S REGIMENT
MORE MEN NEEDED FOR
six thousand additional men
arc wanted a t once to bring the
Twentieth Engineers (Forest)
regiment up to full strength, ae
ei'i'diiig to ollicia,ls of the Forest
SerMee win» have been requested
IN (| 1(
'
War Department to aid in
securing the necessary recruits.
This
j (ppn
second forest regi
ment formed by the War Depart
Inmnl ami w ill be the biggest régi- I
nieiil in 111« 1 world.
'J be first forest regiment has
in France for several
months, busy in cutting and get
ting out of the French forests
timber, lumber, and other mater
ial for our army. Some bat
talions of the Twentieth have
also gone across, and others will
follow as their equipment and
preliminary training are com
pleted. Men who enter this unit
are therefore assured, the offi
cials say, of early service abroad.
Men can join Die regiment by
enlisting if not of draft age and
if within the age limits, which
are from Ifi l«> io. Registrants
under lin* seloetive draft la.w who
have not iM*«*n notified to hold
themselves in readiness to report
for duly at
camp can he
a
i
"imlucli'il" lut
the regiment if
they aj'e
lh«*y can show t hat
qualified for it.
Appl lea ni s
induct ion may apply I
Maini's, supervisor
Forest.
enlistment or
Roscoe 1
f the St. Joe
Kl . Maides, or to the
various other listing officers who
11 :»,\ <* been
eat ion s
for
'iviug local appli
for places in the forest
regiments. Letters of application
must contain a full statement of
f the various
re«*'
in any
work
i'xperieiiee
lines
with
involved,
>f
ami addresses of ejnploy
mvnes
ers.
Three thousand of the men
will consist uf lumber
wanted
jacks, sawmill workers, and men
experienced in building and oper
railroads.
The
lugging
al aig
uiller three thousand will make
up three road and bridge-build
which will serve
ing battailous
auxiliary to ltic logging and
as
Fur these rua,d
sawinill units,
building battalions, men who are
familiar with the operation of
ruad rollers,
crushêrs,
and
rock
motor
graders,
and laborers ex
scrape rs
truck drivers.
road work are re
perienced in
quired.
The lumbering and sawmill
will be made up of
phase of
manufacturing and delivering
lumber and other forest products
lia, I talions
men skilled in every
needed iu the conduct of the war.
Sawyers, teamsters, axemen, lie
makers, cooks, and charcoal
burners are some of the classes
wanted for lhe woods operations.
Graders, track layers, track bos
ses, locomotive engineers and
firemen, hrakemon, machinists
and laborers are needed to con
struct and operate logging rail
roads.
work around sawmills, including
Men skilled in all kinds of
stationary
filers.
boiler makers, truck and tractor
operators and laborers for lum
ber yards are required.
engineers,
»?
*6
t;
23
[*
■.
He who wastes
a crust of bread
prolongs the war
• It
Published at the request of the National Food Adminstralion.
J
j
WILL MAKE CENSUS OF
LUMBER PRODUCTION
\ »„..a..* , » , » 1
duction of the country lur r ■
1917 is to be made by the Forest '
Service in cooperation with ttiol
National lumber Mu* ("0 * .,,.*!!
1 Jt ultIS I

Association.
as in past years. (
Questionnaires have already been
mailed to the 30,000 sawmills
throughout the country asking j
that the amount of each kind of
lumber cut be reported promptly.
It is pointed out by ollicials of
the Forest Service that the lum
| her census is of particular im
portance at this time, because of
the large «luanlities of special
material needed for the conduct
ol the war. Several of (he Gov
ernment Departments, tln-y say,
depend upon the Forest Service
feir data and technical advice on
subjects connected with lumber.
Since the entrance of the United
States into the war this demand
ha« been greatly increased. In
many cases the information
gathered by the Forest Service in
previous years has made it pos
sible to determine at once where
certain classes of material could
be obtained in (he largest quan
tities and consequently has en
abled the Government to get in
direct touch with the proper mills
I
without loss of time.
Hecause of the unsettled con
ditions in the lumber trade in
1917. it ha.s beim somewhat dif
ficult to judge the current pro
duction. Heavy calls for lumber
made by the Government have
been partially offset by trans
portation difficulties ami scarcity
of labor. Officials say that it
will require a careful census to
determine whether the output
was more or less tbap preceding
years. They point out at the
same time that the lumber
manufacturers can ai«i (be work
materially by tilling out and re
turning promptly the questi.in
naires that have been sent. («>
t hem.
A LETTER FROM FRANCE
(Published at the request of the
local Eagle lodge.)
HURRAH FOR OLD KAGLE
ISM, OLD GLORY, THU RED,
WHITE AND BLUE.
Letters from the Eagle mem
bers in the trendies ;pid over in
France :
No doubt you will b«s somewhat
surprised to receive a letter from
me in far off France, but I re
member in one of your letters to
me while I was Secretary of
Lawrence Aerie No. 210, you said
you would be glad to hear from
^ me at any time, so I have found
time to write a few words to you.
I am using a box which originally
contained
I
Corned Willy" as a
Quite different, isn't it,
desk.
from the nice roll-tops we used
to have in the ollice of the Law
rcnce Aerie? We adapt ourselves
very easily to conditions arising
in this country, however. Noth
ing is surprising to us any more.
We left our concentration
camp in Massachusetts during
the latter part of September and
embarked upon a transport a.t
"an Atlantic soap«»rt.'
to sea under the cover of dark
We put
ness with all lights out, convoyed
by (censored). A constant watch
was maintained day and night all
the way over, but in spile of pos
sible danger, life w r as fairly
pleasant aboard ship—pleasant
and monotonous. The only way
to vary monotony was our daily
life-boat drill. When we reached
in which
the danger zone,
submarines operate, the
boa,ts were lowered to the level
of decks ready for instant use,
and wo werft compelled to wear
our
We slept,
life-belts day and night. I
ale, walked in them, j
Since the weather conditions
were 1 airly good all the way over.
the U l1 ' oCUU ' ,lod a lllUu lcSö
t,iau lvvu weeks. One morning,
about 5:30, the cry ran llirough
the ship, "Land in sight." We
discovered then how nervous we
had really been; for the sight of
land was a big relief. We all fell
that, now, since a torpedo had
not got us, we had at least a
lighting chance for our lives.
New hopes and ambitions sprang
up a» the shores of our Sister
Kepublic France, came into full
view. We were unable to reach
our dock until late a^t night.
Then what a reception we re
... .. *, .
cetveti Iruin the people that were
gathered on the shore cheering
gaincieu on me siioic ciieeimg
and waving handkerchiels. Hut
there was something strange
Il ne was something sl.a t ngo
about the crowd, something I
did not, could not, understand.
W ith ill the cheering it was
Willi all the chceung it was
something dilferenl from any
gal bering I ha.l ever seen In'
gal "Cl mg I had cvei seen m
America. Gradually 1 began to
realize that nut a voting man was
realize that nut a young man was
in sight, only women of all ages
ami men nf ni,i Thev fried
and men ol old age. llu> "'«"
to be cheerful, yet, underneath it
all, you could see that their lives
vvere full ,„rrnw Ml France
w ( lull ol souow. All liaiuc
was (and is) in training camps,
or at the front stemming the on
rush of the Huns, who have
desecrated everything that the
French hold dear. 1 wonder what
would happen in our America if
lb«? Boche ever set foot on our
sod '
As soon as we were made fast
to the dock, Yankee troops were
on the gang-planks going ashore
in jig time, and steam was hiss
ing from engines a.s the valuable
cargo we bud brought over began
In go ashore on derricks. The
next morning we marched in to
nii American training or rest
«•amp, where Obi Glory w:*s Hying
from a tall flagstaff, «m French
Tin* French soldiers walk
ing here and there, in quaint uni
forms, with red punis a,ml blue
coats seemed very foreign to us.
Of course by tills time we have
grown accustomed to such sights.
•Our slay in the training camp
was limited to a very short time,
Sl.il.
when, for reasons, which
censorship will not allow me to
state, the welcome nows came
that wo were to move,
packs
marched through the
the ancient seaport to
roail station,
Soon our
were rolled and we
streets of
the ra,il
which iu times of
been a very
Here women
peace must have
beautiful place,
were to be seen in l:vg»* numbers
rking in the coal-yards, wash
ing railroad ears, in fact, per
forming all the work once per
formed by the men now in train
ing at the front. We were some
what surprised to find "Side-door
Pullmans" of the European type,
Wi
which are about half tin* siz<* of
our freight cars, lined up ready
for us to pile in. A sign on our
showed that they
"Parlor Ca.rs
could accomodate
or eight horses. We were
•aliens for the
Some time later we arrived
Impressions
about forty
men
issued emergency
trip.
at our destination.
«»f the ride a.re out of order, but
1 may say that our present loca
tion is a very beautiful section of
, .
France, and Dial we aye w«u 'in
from morning until night. bo
much for a brief description of
our < ri P
1 wish to thank you xcry Km« ^y
for the sweets and good 1 ungs
(to eat, the cigars, tobacco, am
the'cigarettes, and also reading mat
The men in our army run
up in the hundreds and at least
twenty per cent of these men are
They also join in with
expressing their thanks
Eagles.
me m
JO.
GRAVE LY'S
CELEBRAT*«»
J lS3Lg2rr S2ÆS
Bator* th* fnvantlo»
•« our Patant Air Pw»l
Many Dealer* Could Not Koop
th* Flavor *nd Fr**hn*** J"
ft CAL GRAVELY PLUG TOBACCO.
Now th* P*t*nt Po»ch *■*■** W
Fr**h and Cl**n *"d Good
A Ute* Chew *» Gr*v*l,
and Laote Lon«or than a bid ohaw
of ordinary plus.
rVVU»
IVll£.'ard T hewe m
HE IS! (
A*
#
A
5*
\h
8
(il ^
4
j
%
(A
I
rf kir
ÎY;
\ LOOK FOR. THE PROTECTION SEAL
IT IS NOT REAL GRAVELY WITHOUT IUj
THIS SEAL Vfcrd
X
[for
the different things the Fra
ternal Order of Eagles have sent
them. 1 am known a,s the lied
Headed Gunner.
Wishing you all the good luck
in the Wl ' rld * aad wishing the
magazine all the success it de
serves under your management,
I a#n
Fraternally and
Sincerely Yours,
WILLIAM McOINNIS,
W. V. P.
Aerie 216 F. O. E.
Gpl. Win. McGinnis,
C Battery 102 P. A.
Am. Ex. Forces,
Via New York, N. Y.
-
HOLD YOUR LIBERTY BONDS
c , .. ., ...
Secretary of the treasury Me
* i .. 4 . „ P
Adit uigt.s Uo puichasers of
, y j, oan h <jIu i s ,, r both the
»,
sl an<1 hecond issues to hold
fnst to their bonds. They are the
, , itl
Seel' s sl ît! !;. a s
lt ' s statement was
CBlu , d fortll by the fact that Lib
pplv hn M (ipa ...... hftin£r „„
y * . ,,0,d * Is a,c being ap
pl . ()llch p d from time to time by
, in
lM so to Induce them to
"
t with Hicir Liberty Loan
.. . . , . , • ,
* and n tx 'hangi so
curies which in a number of
L. iapa llf „ „„„an«., «hi«
' . .... i ..." . a « ..
d,,d PIompl.nl by tllC
desire to protect the bondholders
n „ nillHl i||_ a(lviscd disposition of
..V,.; P bonds
. T , M . Se.-Vetary expresses the
j IO j, p u, a ^ every purchaser of a
uiterly H.tn.l will realize that the
,, n ] y genuine help that ho gives
| |js Government is keeping his
bond as an investment so long
as it is possible for him to do so.
stall's, however, that iv> just
objection lies to the sal«? of a
Liberty Bond where real neces
sily I'xisls for its sal«*.
EAGLES WILL CARRY
LIFE INSURANCE
For some time past the Frater
nal Gr«l«*r «»I Eagles have been
diseasing the subject of Frater
nal l.ifo-lnsurt%noe. The result
of-the discussions and investiga
tions carried cm was that the
Grand Ai'ric of Buffalo decided
add a. Life-Insurance to the
beneficial features of the order.
In the first place it is perhaps
I.
well to stale that the taking out
of tills insurance is not cumpul
il is option!»,]. And is any
way does it interfere with the
sick or death benefits, or any
other beneficial or recreational at
present in vogue with our Sub
ordinate Aeries.
Reduced to the simplest terms,
there are two mentis by which
an ordinary man is moved to in
sure his life. The first is solici
tai ion through either printed ad
vertising or lh<* personal appear- |
mice of an agent. Both methods
of solicitation arc employed by I
successful commercial insurance
companies, whether stock or
(
mutual they are, however, costly,
and form the chief item in the
expense of operating.
The other way in whioli per
sons are induced to insure is
through the influence of associa
tion. The tendency to do as
»Ibers <lo, this is the motive ex
•rleil in a fralertial body, and it
nothing. Hence fraternal
life insurance can be offered at a
lower price than the commercial
or old line insurance.
Some of the further a«l

f fraternal Iifinsur
ance may be enumerated as fol
lows :
First: If is a co-operative in
stitution, not organized for profit
nor for the benefit of one person
or a few persons. They are asso
vantages
jciate.l together for protection of
one another.
Seconil : This work of the fra*t
ernal society is not like life in
îsnrance but it is protection. It
'gives aid in case of sickness, and
secures a benetit to be paid in
case of death, and in that way
serves as a protection for the
home.
Third: Since this protection is
secured by a mall monthly pay
ment, the benefit are obtained at
an expense that is not burden
seme. And few men are unable to
pay the premiums. The cost is
small compared with the benefit,
Fourth: The protection that is
given is made secure by exemp
lions from claims of creditors, a
benefit certificate cannot bo
pledged. No creditors can "at
lach" any portion of the amount
t, be paid at death. The money
goes direct to the persons who
npp .« o
l,etH1 11 m °si.
Therefore a man in choosing
his fr .., ernitv is sure to seleiît
11 iraierniiy is suit, 10 seieci
u»», organization in which, other
lhinM being eaua, the surest
mings uemg equal, 'n< surest
safe » uard can bo «btnined, at the
mos t moderate rate. This sure
...... leas , coatlv a nraclion is te
and ltusl cosl,y alliacimn is v
j„. f ound ln Ollf LlfO-lnsuriUlOe
i
1
The loyal Eagle can render a
- ppvipi . ... r ,.. ltpi .., itv
service to his li.il« inity ami
j,j s friends by inducing the latter
v-iih the former in
l( ' anu,al ' " m ' lho . lorin , er - ln
order to partake ol ils substan
Ua , l.euellts. Hill, Hr t, be llllll
... , . . . nilvantage of
in ..i aie, " lu t and clumuesl"
the ordei .*, In si .^ml cheapest
,,M,UP,inoe -
It will also lie understood any
member taking out insurance,
and upon being called to render
service to his country, aiul after
being sent, abroad, he is exempt
from all dues. In case of death
will receive the sum of one
thousand dollars from the Frat
ernal Order of Eagles. Another
good feature about Un> Fraternal
Order of Eagles, is that they have
bought over a million dollars
worth of Liberty Homls and are
going to buy more. The reason
this is mentioned is because
there has been a certain element
trying to make it appear that the
Fraternal Order of Eagles has
been very unpatriotic, which is a
falsehood, and furthermore, I
don't think there is an awful lot
of truth to such an element that
will advocate such talk.
Another good feature about the
Fraternal Order of Eagles are
that they give free meilical treat
ment to himself, his wife or his
children. And during sickness or
|
i',
I
accident will receive seven dol
lars a week, and in ease of death
Life is sometimes
free burial,
what we make it.
Fraternally yours,
THE FRATERNAL
ORDER OF EAGLES.
P. S.—For those desiring to
become members we have a spe
cial dispensation which will en
able you to be admitted during
this dispensation for the small
isurn of five dollars. This will be
open for sixty days, a.nd you'll
not ho charged examination
fe«> as the Order lias provided for
this. Come along, prospective
Brother, it is a duty you owe
yourself and family.
NOTICE
The annual meeting of the
stock-holders and Board of Di
rectors of the Renfro Creek Ry.
Co. will be held at the office of
the company a t Fernwood, Idaho,
at two o'clock P. M. on the I8lh
day of February, 1918.
LEO. F. REILLY.
Secretary.
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that a
for all
Special Examination
classes of Teachers' Certificates
will be held at the Court House
February 21, 22, 23.
RUTH E. GERHART,
County Superintendent.

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