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Lewiston evening teller. [volume] (Lewiston, Idaho) 1903-1911, December 11, 1907, Image 1

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Lewiston Evening Teller
THIBTY-FIRST YEAR—NO. 2G9.
LEWISTON. IDAHO. WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 11. 1907
STQESSEL TRIAL
MOW ON;
;SCEKE DE COURUMARTIAL IS
SPECTACULAR—NEARLY 200
WITNESSES TO BE HEARD—
COURT APPARENTLY BIASED
Stoessel Holds a Telegram "From the
Czar Which :It Is Thought Will
Have Considerable Bearing on the
r
Case
* -
ST. PETERSBURG, Dec. 11.--The
trial of General Stoessel opened yes
terday In ithe auditorkam of ,,the
Army and Navy -club
•my ana «avy «uu.
^ . n , firo 0
The room resembled more & socîki
gathering of officers of high ran«
than the seen« of a courtmartial
ent at Port Arthur and who -today
were clothed In their full dress uni
forms with stars and decoration«.
The trial was convoked by Vice
Admiral Doubasoff. He declared It
to be the duty of the court to pro
ceed with the trial of the four offi
cers charged with the responsibility
of surrendering the fortress of Port
Arthur on terms dishonorable to the
Among .1» ]«■<«.
were ^
kin, Linevttch and Rennenkamp,
Tice Admiral Wiren and scores of
other prominent leaders in the Rus
«o-Japanese war.
__ . ____, oft<v
There were also ■«*; " n n ^'
cers and soldiers who had been pres
Artnur on terms u.sn.m, >.«».* vu u.c
garrison of Russia and humiliating
to the prestige of the Russian army,
He then called the roll of the 200
witnesses, includ'ng General Kuro
patkin and Vice Admiral Wiren.
Seveial of the witnesses were absent,
but the court derided to proceed
with the trial.
One or -two incidents showed the
attitude of 4:he court to he unfavor
able to General Stoessel. His perso
nal request that two additional wit
nesses be called -in was dismissed
without ceremony.
One of these witnesses, Dr. Rosea
noff, chief of the Red Cross In the
fortress, at the preliminary hearing
testified at the time of the surrender
General Stoessel had 8,000 able
bodied men to defend the hundreds
. , , .. 0 v„ n A rpfl ,
bodied men to defend the hundreds
of miles of fortifications, and the
cold winds at times made it difficult
for the soldiers even to hold their j
rifles. ' ( ,
w Gênerai Kad'ien, the other witness)
excluded, is the author of a deposl- !
tion similar to that of Dr. Roseanoff. ,
It is generally understood that
ll. IS geueian 3 ----------- -
Stoessel Is in possession of a weapon
in the shape of a telegram received
by him before the surrender of Port
Arthur, in which the emperor said.
"Don't push the defense to ex
tremitles," meaning by this to spare
the lives of Russian soldiers when
their power of resistance was ex
hausted, as the emperor feared that
the Japanese might repeat the fea
of a former capture o* the fortress,
when they put to death 10,000 Chi
nese.
GOVERNMENT TO
INVESTIGATE
TROUBLE BETWEEN GOLDFIELD
MINERS AND MINE OWNERS
TO BE INVESTIGATED BY DE
PARTMENT OFFICIALS
WASHINGTON, Dec. 11 .—After
a conference with the president to
day, Assistant Secretary Murray of
the department of commerce and la '
bor, Commissioner Charles P. Neill
and Commissioner of Corporations
and Commissioner of Corporati -
Herbert Smith announced that they
would leave for Goldfield this after
noon to make a thorough lnvestlga
ake a thorough invesuga
tion of the trouble between the mln
ers and operators.
Airs assumed by the self-made
man are mostly fresh airs.
SUNDAY LAW
CONSTITUTIONAL
SUPREME COURT HANDS DOWN
LAW UPHOLDING, THE ACT OF
LAST SESSION PROHIBITING
BUSINESS ON SUNDAY * 1
BOISE, id».. De-, u.—to an qpln
iou handed down by the supreme
court yesterday, written by Justice
Stewa,t ' fhief Justlce Ailshie aml
Justice Sullivan concurring, the
Sunday rest law passed by the last a
legislature has been declared con
stitutional.
Wool of the Third district, and the

r ^ A H
_
read , ng:
The opinion Is in the ease of the .
state vs. W. F. Dolan, appellant, on
appeal from the decision of Judge I
lower court is affirmed. The ease
was argued at the Lewiston term,
'\Z
'
juments were made by the at
tor«ey general and three of his as
sist tents and by the prosecuting at
tor neve of Ada and Shoshone coun
^ R p QuarleB> amletl8
. . ... .. . , . n
curiea, -upholding the act, and by C.,
—, — t k An
E. Cavanali, J. J. Blake of Ada coun- ,
, T „ «
ty and J. P. Gray, H. P. Knight, H.
Conner ot
. -rn, , (e
Shoshone coe-nty. The opinion is
, . ......
voluminous anti upholds the law on
,, _____. -
all points, the first paragraph of the
w
'**■ exercise of its police power
a state may prohibit the conduct of
business on Sunday.
:
FLIP OF COIN
. DECIDES CASE
TOSSING THE COIN BECOMING
POPULAR—JURY IN GOUCHER
CASE DETERMINES VERDICT
BY HEAD AND TAIL MEANS
Robert Goucher, the Spalding bar
n fro
teurer, was yesterday afternoon con
victed of the charge of selling whis-.
{ßy tQ aH j n( jj an jjy a 5ury In Justice !
j-h's cpyrt, composed W. A» HiI1 > r
y Rinnard, Charles Sampson, EïFBj
a i r d, M. Scully and M. Ward,
-pjj e j ury stood three for acquittal;
gnd three for conviction, ànd the,
anu imeo vu* v»»>—1--- 1
flna) decision Wa8 reached by the flip
of a coln w hich determined the ver-j
dJct to be rendered which was
of
agl i ns t the defendant. -
B . .__win
Attorney J. L. Harn appeared for j
nouc b er and filed a motion for a ne ^ j
trlal on the grounds that a manis !
llberty cannot be gambled awa>, no ;
can he be place d in jeopardy tw cc
Qn tbe same charge, as he alleg
was d , n this case, the
bav , ng been acquitted of the charg
of selling 1 l q t UOr ^ ^" day n ' ^ s e ed P t ; ;
eifle case being the san
secure the conviction on thi s char K e -
j
1
CULL FOR VOTE
ON PROHIBITION
MICHIGAN STATE GRANGE ASKS
!
TO HAVE "DRY" CLAUSE IN
m ^^rrrnmnw NOW IN
NEW CONSTITUTION NOW IN
PREPARATION j
— j
SAGINAW, Mich.. Dec. 11 —The !
' Grange wlt h a membership of
' annua , meetlng her e
adopte(J reso i u tlon calling for the
congtltutlona] convention in session
Lansing to Insert a clause in the
congtltutloQ prohibiting all traffic In,
congtltutloo prohibiting
j
A woman.'* figure, like her age, Is
sometimes a doubtful quantity.
DRAWING LINES
ABOUT POWERS
CONFESSION OF YOUTSEY NOW
SERVING LIFE SENTENCE FOR
IMPLICATION IN THE CRIME,
BAD FOR POWERS
GEORGETOWN Ky„ Dec. ll.
Henry E. Youtsey. now serving a life!
sentence in the penitentiary for
comr,,c ' ty in th e assassination ot
former Governor Wm. E. Goebel, was|
a witness yesterday in the trial of I
Caleb Powers. He told of a conver-|
sation with Dr. W. R. Johnson as
cartridges were bought Johnson be
«.» imnotiont nrwi «ntn VnntRpv
to killing Goebel and of the purchase j
by Youtsey of smokeless cartridges
I fl Cincinnati. He said before
came impatient, and said Youtsey
could shoot Goebel fro>i the secre
To«* l even,, ,e„a
>»« »„ « «*. .«««* ,„d the „red
arations which he had arranged for
the showing. Tt was Youtsey who
Mowar(] ^ , g a to
^ Thp 8hootl n hjs
. ,. .
rlval at Fratfkfor '- Yo ?*" y t0,d ,° f
Placing guns in Powers office, rais
ing the window and drawing the
....
curtain to the window, of pointing
, . , ..
out Goebel as he approached the cap
......
ito1 and seelnK Howard aim at his
Victim. He then left the window and
_ .
heard the crack of the rifle as he
...
was descending the stairs.
. „
The witness connected Powers dl
rectlv bv stating that he fixed the
door for tbe entr ance of the assassin
and approved of the plan,
Youtsey said also former Gover
nor Taylor dictated a letter to him,
asking Howard to come to Frankfort
: to do "the job."
! Youtsey testified that Taylor said
he would give $1,500 a free pardon
! and a military escort to the moun
! tains to the man who would kill
i Goebel.
PROBE DEEPER
LAND FRAUDS
'-i*.
fro AND JURY CALLED IN THE
GRAND JURY
COLORADO CASES WILL SEEK
TO BRING GUILTY PARTIES TO
JUSTICE
DENVER,
Colo.
1 . . .
grand jury w c . . .
will probe < eep n o a n b
frauds, and it is believed a number
.
jj ec 1:1 _The'llrt
convened today |
of men
of wealth and prominence
- . .. Hr „o
.__win be caught in the federal drag
j
j De ^ he murder of Joseph A. Walker,
! gervlce agent ftt the
; mlne near Durango, re
hag gt , rred the federa l au
thorltle> to exgrt themselve s to the
utmost t0 bring the gu ,i ty parties to
Evidence that has been
justice. Evidence that has been
; gathered personally by Chief John A
Wilkie and some of his most able
agsistants win be lald be fore the
grand jury.
j Its work, it ls espected will be
1 more far-reaching than that of the
j
I
grand ' jury "which indicted" seventy-1
three men last summer for alleged j
land frauds. The trials of those now ,
! under indictment will begin in the !
United States district court here next 1
week !
___________________ j
j
MEETS THURSDAY
COMMITTEE
.
Democrats to Decide Upon Date and
^ q{ Next Convention
CHICAG0 Dec n —Thomas Tag
gart, chairman of the democratic
national committee, left yesterday
for Washington, where the commit
tee will meet on Thursday to decide
out the official list of cities which are
upon date and place of the next dem
ocratic convention.
Before leaving Mr. Taggart gave
after the convention. Tt Includes St.
Paul, Atlantic City, Louisville, Chi
cago, Denver, St. Louis and Cincin
nati.
RETURNS FROM
A MONTO TOUR
DR. MACLEAN, PRESIDENT OF
STATE UNIVERSITY, VISITS IN
STITUTIONS OF EAST—TAKES
IN LIVESTOCK SHOW
turned
Gona ] institutions and was in at
MOSCOW, Dec 11.—President
MacLean of the state university re
from a month's tour in the
East yesterday.
He visited several of the educa
tendance at the National Association
0 f ^| a { e Universities at Washington,
ID. C.
\niong other questions discussed
th » re was the foundation of a na
tliÇjtional university to he the head ot
the public educational system of the
United States.
Dr. MacLean visited the Interna
tional Livestock association show in
Chicago, where the finest specimens
of livestock the world has produced
were on exhibition.
"There are evidences of good crops
in all the sections visited" said Dr.
MacLean, and he spoke of the pleas
ant weather, with but slight snow
fall as vet. and of the excellent time
made on the return journev, two
davs and three hours being all that,
was required for the trip between
Minneapolis and Moscow.
POSTOFFICE
FOR NEW ILÜ
ORDER TO REMOVE POSTOFFICE
FROM OLD TOWN OF IL0 TO
NEW TOWN RECEIVED—WILL
WIPE OUT OLD TOWN
Special to Evening Teller.
ILO, Dec. 11.—Citizens of the
town of llo are jubilant today over
the fact that they are to retain their
postefflee. Word just received from
Congiessman Burton L. French ls to
the effect that the postoffice depart
ment has sanctioned the removal of
the postoffice from the old town to
the new, and the removal is being
made today. ~ —
This marks the complete wiping
out of the former town of llo and
the building up of a new townslte on
the railroad. The citizens are con
gratulating themselves on the
change, and are further pleased with
near approach of thé railroad,
| which ls within a mile of the town.
BANKER GOES BY
SUICIDE ROUTE
j CALIFORNIA BANK WRECKER
I ENDS HIS LIFE WITH SHOTGUN
RATHER THAN FACE IMPEND
ING PROSECUTION
to
by
SAN FRANCISCO, Dec. 11.—T.
Otway Sudleir. manager of the West
End branch of the California Safe
Deposit Trust company, committe
suicide during the night, blowing off
the top of his head with a shotgun.
His body w r as found this morning.
He wa «3 a close friend of J. Dalzel
Brown, vice president and general
manager of the company, who is In
Prison accused of embezzlement.
FUNSTON GOES
TO GOLDFIELD
SAN FRANCISCO. Dec. 11.—Fun
ston started for Goldfield early to
day, where he will personally exam
ine conditions so as to be fully pre
pared for any emergency.
LOOKOUT NOT
FARMERS OF LOOKOUT EXPERI
ENCE NO FINANCIAL EMBAR
RASSMENT—BIG PROFITS IN
DIVERSIFIED FARMING j
te know of the flnau
dal stringency is what we read in
"About all
the papers," said C. S. Puntenny,
merchant of Lookout, who was a vis-|
itor in tlie city yesterday.
The farmers of the Lookout sec -1
tion are not only engaged in the cut- |
tivation of grain crops, but are also j
engaged in fruit raising, dairying!^
and livestock, and the residents ot j
.. . , ..
the mountain section secure large
, .. , , , .
revenues from the sale of lumber and i
w * I
„ ' .. , I
"Of course the^e is a slight de
, . , , , . . s
crease in business, but there is plen- ;
. , , .
tv of monev and our people are not
' , ,, , , .. I
matsriailv affected by the money
shortage that has embarrassed all
.........Vi 7' ....., 1. .. „ .
lines of business in other sections of,
..
the country.
_ . , .. .
Mr. Puntenny states the people
are making elaborate preparations
for the celebration of Christmas and
the citizens will he addressed on
Fridav, Saturday and Sunday even-!
ings bv E. D Nichols, the temper
ance worker who ls now lecturing In
the northern part of the state.
The Lookout school now has an
attendance of ahout 60 pupils, and
HllrllUil 111 U m nimm uu
the eight grades are being efficiently
tlight bv Miss Mann, who was se-|
ctired bv the Lookout district last
___j
I
j
I
!
EXPECT TROUBLE
IN GOLDFIELD
CLASH BETWEEN MINERS AND
3ÔLDIERS OR MINE OWNERS
MAY BE PRECIPITATED AT
ANY MOMENT
GOLDFIELD, Dec. 11.—The situa
tion here ls becoming more intense
and nearly everybody anticipates
trouble of some sort tonight or to
morrow at the latest.
Captain Swain of the Thiels Detec
tive agency left for San Francisco ^
to bring 500 miners here, mostly j
strikebreakers from Idaho and Cali- j
fornla. ^1^5. ? TTg j
It appears efforts are being made |
by the Muiè Owners' association to j
Induce Col. Reynolds, commanding ;
the troops, to declare martial law. j
Reynolds is unwilling to take this
action until some act of violence ts
committed or on the arrival of
Funston.
Reynolds was shown specimens of
ore taken from men charged with
"high-grading." Three more "high
graders" were captured today.
The Mine Owners' association of
fice still asserts vhat the mines will
be worked tomorrow and that they
have men engaged to work them.
UUURT EIXES
QUEER VALUES
NEW YORK, Dec. 11.—A boy's
life is worth $800, but a boy's leç is
worth $10,000, according to two ver
dicts just handed down by the su
preme court.
John Sheehanson, killed in a run
away, was awarded $800, and Arthur
Clements, who lost a leg by a trol
ley car, got $10,000.
was
'
'
by
! of
'
First Official Electrocution
TRENTON, N. J., Dec. 11.—The
first official execution under the new
law In New Jersey occurred at the
penitentiary early today, when Ser
vlo dl Giovanni paid the penalty_ »or
: the murder of Joseph Sanson. The
1 electrocution was a success.
OIG SHIPMENT:
CATTLE, HOGS
BALES & JONES SHIP FR01C
STITES TO COAST POINTS 8T
CARLOADS OF FAT CATTED
AND HOGS - _ _
Stockmen's Meeting in Spokaser
Shows Idaho County Ships More:
Than Spokane Market can Cea.
sume. .
r be firm 0 f Rales & Jones wHF
n shipment of 22 carloads
cattie and hogs from Stites on I>b^
. . „ . ^
cember 14. The shipment will chief—
ly go to coast points, where the firm
has filled large contracts during- the
past few months,
... . ,
A shipment of 4 80 hogs occupying;
. „
six cars, was made from Stites yes
terday by E. S. Sweet of Grange—
ville The hoge were consigned tcs>
^
the Stanton Meat company fn Sp»
!, . ... . . . . ._
ikane, and will be used in supplying:
t,le • pohane tra e.
" Idaho count y shi l> 8 more fat
than ls consumed in the city of Bpo
liana an(1 the outside dealers ng
l» ,led b y Spokane meat firms,"—
Robert Jones of the firm of Bales ®
Jones, when discussing the stock in
dustry in central Idaho. "This vav
brought out in reports submitted aC
<he stockmen's meeting held In Spo
kane last an * ha ™ vromn
ed to increase the stock output or
the county as the population of the'
city ls Increased.
I "The stock shipments each year*
j bring large sums of money into thee
I county to be divided among thw
! farmers and stockmen and the finan
cial condition of the farmers of Ida
ho county-bespeaks the benefits ac
crued from tills feature of the agrF
cultural industry."
AnO|||l|%n TCI I O
UKuHAHU ! tLLu
GRAPHIC STOBY
CHIEF WITNESS FOR STATE DE
TAILS HIS CONNECTION WITHE
CRIMES, IMPLICATING PETTI
B0NE AND FEDERATION jt
is
BOISE, Ida., Dec. 11.—OrcEmrdl
was the first witness in the FfcttA
bone trial today. The witness mm
dressed in a new suit. His general
appearance showed little afiansm
since the Haywood trial.
Pettibone and Moyer watched hin»
closely, but the witness merely
glanced in their direction. Petti—
bone's name was brought Into* Utm
testimony the first time when Or
' chard said the defendant told him Or
' 1901 that the guns used in the 1899
riots were shipped in piano box«
by him from Denver.
Orchard told of the taking posse»
sion of the train by miners going tm
Wardner, where he touched off tra«
! of the boxes of dynamite that' blew
' the Bunker Hill and Sullivan noUS
to pieces. He afterwards went to
Cripple Creek, where he engaged Iw
"high-grading" at the Vindicata* -
mine.
He testified that W. F. Davts. m
striker, asked him to blow up tb»
mine while the nonunion men wer«
at work. He consented to do so. H«
told of the killing of Beck and Mc
Cormick In the Vindicator by *
bomb that Orchard said he and BflTr
Aikmen placed there for the purpoen
of 1-filing nonunion workmen..
WESTERN UNION DIVIDEND' 1
the
»or
The
Amounts Made Payable in StoÄ' of
the Corporation
NEW YORK, Dec. 11.—The direc
tors of the Western Union today
dared a quarterly dividend ot 1H
percent, payable in Btock of the cm«
apny.

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