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Lewiston evening teller. (Lewiston, Idaho) 1903-1911, March 11, 1908, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091109/1908-03-11/ed-1/seq-1/

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Lewiston Evening Telle'r
-SECOND YEAR—NO. 61.
thirty
LEWISTON, IDAHO, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 1908.
KILLS PARTNER
ETS REVOLVER IN NIGHT,
SHOOTS HER BEST FRIEND,
THEN SUICIDES—WOMEN CON
DUCTED SCHOOL.
BOSTON, March 11.—At the Lau
rens schuol, an exclusive finishing
school patronized by the daughters
of wealthy parents, last night Miss
Sarah Chamberlain Weeed of Chest
nut street, Philadelphia, shot and
hilled Miss Elizabeth Bailey Har
dee and then committed suicide.
The women were partners in the
operation of the school. Overwork,
following the opening of the school
last October, resulted ln Miss Weed's
breakdown, and she was sent to a
sanitarium, but escaped her nurses
last night and returned to the
school.
Miss Hardee volunteered to care
for her. It was noticed that Miss
Weed acted strangely and finally
the was induced to go to bed. This
morning the bodies of both women
were found In bed with bullet holes
In their head. Medical Examiner
Stedman declared that Miss Weed
committed suicide after she killed
Miss Hardee.
GOLDTHWAITE AT SPOKANE.
Commercial Club Puts Man at Rail
road Gateway.
The resources of the Lewlston
Clarkston valley will be exploited In
Spokane by W. M. Goldthwaite, who
has been secured by the Commercial
club to establish headquarters there
during the period of the spring im
migration. Mr. Goldthwaite occu
pied a similar position last year,
and the results of his efforts were
most satisfactory.
During the months of March and
April the Immigration travel will be
very heavy because of the low rates
granted by the railroads, and It Is
proposed to stock the representative
with Instructive literature of the
Lewlston-Clarkston country.
i IN JAIL
EIGHT YEARS
LOUISVILLE, Ky., March 10.
Caleb Powers, more confident than
«ver that he will soon regain his
freedom, today completed eight
years of confinement in Kentucky
jails as the result of his alleged
complicity In the murder of William
Goebel. Under the direction of Col.
Sidney C. Tapp, a prominent Atlan
ta lawyer, a monster petition is be
ing prepared asking for the pardon
of Powers. It is expected to pre
sent this application for pardon to
Covernor Wilson at Frankfort
within the next two weeks.
If the petition Is not granted.
Powers will be placed on trial next
summer for the fifth time. The
lourth trial ended at Georgetown
lsst January in a disagreement of
the jury. At his first trial Powers
was convicted and his punishment
Axed at life imprisonment. This
was in August, 1900. At the sec
ond trial, which was granted by the
supreme court, again the verdict
was guilty and the punishment fixed
the same as before. Then came the
third trial in August. 1903. This
time the verdict was guilty and the
death penalty fixed.
DAD FIRE
IN MANILA
MANILA, T>. I., March 11.—Two
thousand native shacks were de
stroyed by fire today and 15,000 are
homeless, cared for in the churches
0r by the police. The total damage
»as $100,000.
SPRECKLES GIVES
I
FILES AFFIDAVIT IN RUEF CASE
IN REGARD TO IMMUNITY
CONTRACT AND SAYS RUEF
WAS TO BE PUNISHED.
SAN FRANCISCO, March 11.—
Affidavits In regard to the Ruef im
munity contract will be filed in
Judge Lawlor's court today by Ru
dolph Spreckles and by Ruef him
self. Spreckles' affidavit contains a
declaration that he always under
stood, believed and insisted that
Ruef would be given substantial
punishment and that Henev always
agreed with him in this resppct, and
always declared his Intention of
Sending Ruef to prison.
Spreckles further says he never
saw the partial immunity contract
cr knew of its contents until after
it was made public In 'January,
last.
The affidavit of Ruef is largely
devoted to a bitter attack on the
prosecution and a vigorous denial of
the statements contained In the affi
davits it has filed.
Now on Mountain Trip.
LARAMIE, Wyo., March 11.—
The American car In the New York
to Paris race left here at 7:35 this
morning for Rawlins, Wyo., 117
miles west. The roads are reported
to be in bad condition.
Italians Have Good Roads.
GRAND ISLAND, Neb., March 11.
The Italian car in the auto race
left here at 8:10 this morning with
fiflne weather and good roads ahead.
MORSE PLEADS
NOT^ GUILTY
FORMER PARTNER OF HEINZE
PLACED UNDER $30,000 BAIL
TO ANSWER 29 COUNTS IN
U. S. CIRCUIT COURT.
NEW YORK, March 11.—Charles
W. Morse, former banker, and Alfred
H. Curtis, formerly president of the
National Hank of North America,
pleaded not guilty in the United
Ftates circuit court here today to a
joint indictment on 29 county, in
cluding 18 for conspiracy and 11 for
making false entry. The bail was
fixed at $30.000 "for Morse and
$1000 for Curtis.
Survey of Idaho Lands.
WASHINGTON, March 11.—Sen
ator Heyburn's bill providing for a
survey of the public lands In Idaho
passed the senate today.
HAD PLANNED
CONVICT MUTINY
CHICAGO, March 11.—A dispatch
to the Tribune from Pontiac, 111.,
says:
A desperate rush of 700 mutinous
convicts for the wall which stands
between them and liberty took place
at th estate reformatory yesterday.
The guards put up a stubborn fight
and the ringleaders, old crlmipals,
were herded into the top gallery.
There on a narrow platform, 40 feet
from the main floor, they fought,
unîll finally quelled.
Half a dozen guards and as many
prisoners were Injured In the fight.
Proof of a well-defined plan to
overthrow the guards and free the
prisoners was discovered by the In
stitution officials. An effort will be
made to seek out the other ring
leaders and nrevent fvrther plans
from maturing.
''jUM
R
DEF NOW SEEKING Tl)
OBTAIN HIS RELEASE
,
ACTION BEGUN TODAY TO REDUCE BAIL CT BOSS BOODIER FROM
AI, 250,000 TO HALF THAT AMOI&TT, WHICH RUEF SAYS
HE CAN EASILY RAISE—EX-MAYOR SCHMITZ IS ALREADY
AT LIBERTY.
SAN FRANCISCO, March 11.—
Following the setting at liberty
upon bail aggregating $345,000 of
former Mayor Eugene E. Schmitz
last night, after he had been con
fined nine months in the county
jail, preliminary steps were taken
today for the release of Ruef, whose
attorneys took advantage of the ad
mission In Heney's voluminous affi
davit that Ruef had been twice in
dieted on every charge against him
with the exception of half a dozen
charges on which he was Indicted
separately. '
Ach asked that the bail be reduc
ed to a nominal sum or that he he
released on his own recognizance,
Judge Lawlor held the suggestion
proper that the defendant should he
relieved of the burden of the addi
POLITICIAN NOT
WITH DUBOIS
A representation on the Important
state boards from three northern
counties and the elimination of the
Mormon test oath is the tenor of
the democratic drift in Latah coun
ty according to a statement made
by Attorney W. M. Mor e .„ who !»
visitnr in the oltv
a Visitor in tue city.
"1 have made a careful Investiga
tion of the conditions of the party
in our county and find the leaders
generally favorable to the elimina
tion of the Mormon test plank from
the state platform," said Mr. Mor
gan. "It Is not a question of retir
ing from the position of believing
that polygamy should be stopped,
but leading democrats do not believe
It should be a political issue any
more than any of the vices against
which the state laws provide a
means of abatement. The same
laws can be brought into use
against poligamy If the localities in
which the offense is perpetrated are
against such practices and if the
people brought into contact with the
condition do not object, our people
do not believe in agitating the
■latter in other sections of the state. -
"If the matter of instructing a
vote against thee adoption of the
would be safe to predict that the
delegation would go to the state
convention with instructions to j
vote against the adoption of the|
test oath clause In the state plat
form.
The people of Latah county are
not in sympathy with the adminis
tration of Governor Gooding and
they regard the nomination of Mr.
Brady as an indication of the repub
lican party to continue the policies
of the Gooding administration. Be
_ ___
cause" of This" fee"ung ~any go*l dem
i____ a
ocrat who has not been too promt-'
nent In the party strife, will poll a I
•majority of the Latah county vote. I
The county democrats are favor
able to nominating men to office
who have not taken a foremost
place In the party controversies and
will labor for a representation on.
the Important state boards from the
northern counties.
"In connection with this position
\V. E. Stillinger, republican, is
prominently mentioned as a candi
date for the office of attorney gen
eral. Mr. Stillinger Is one of our
very best lawyers and Is serving his
third term as county attyney of La
tah county. So successful has been
his administration that he was
unanimously elected to the office
at the last election, the democratic
party decl'nlng to nominate an op
ponent. Should Mr. Stillinger re
ceive the state nomination, it would
be says to say that he would secure
a majority of the votes of Latah
county."
tional indictments and Heney will
tomorrow designate on which indict
ments Ruef Is to be released on his
own recognizance,
This will reduce Ruef's bail from
$1,250,000 to $600,000, which Ruef
declared he could give the moment
his plea of guilty to the charge of
extortion before Judge Dunne is
withdrawn.
__
SAN FRANCISCO, March 11.—
Eugene E. Schmitz was released
from jail last night after presenting
bonds in the sum of $150,000. His
bondsmen are T. H. Williams and
W. J. Dingee. The charges of extor
tion against him on which he had
not yet been tried were dismissed.
Schmitz on $150,000 Bail.
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EXECUTION
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LONDON, March 11.—A dispatch
from St. Petersburg says three boI
diers belonging to one of the caval
ry regiments of the Russian Guards
were recently secretly and summar-]
n y executed in the Petropavlosk j
fortress. Deep mystery surrounds |
>*e -lr. which h„ o»«d th. mo,.
speculation in view of the wild ru
....... ..
mors current within the past few
weeks of conspiracies against the
Imperial household.
The three men were suddenly
placed under arrest, a somewhat
vague charge of "furthering the!
revolutionary propaganda" being
brought against them. There was
no trial, but two hours later there j
arrived a messenger from Szarskoe
gelo bearlng a triple death sentence. »
B lg congldered significant that the !
]a " t favor
document should come, not from the j
war minister, as under ordinary cir
cumstances, but from the czar him
self.
The doomed men were at once re-1
moved from the barracks to the fort
ress. The officer in charge stated
that the czar had granted them a
the privilege of being
shot Instead of meeting death on
- the gal i owg one of the men stam
mered a word of thanks. His corn
p an ] ons remained silent, and in an
ctbor Instant the sentences bad been
ca rrled out.
-—
g TEEIj OVER ANOTHER SPAN,
Crew on Bridge to Reach South
Abutment Next Week.
The girders for the fifth span of
the Clearwater bridge were extend
ed to the second pier from the south
abutment today, and the truss con
struction will be in place by Friday
(night. The false work used in the
finnsf ru pH nn nf thf two SDäDS COTIl
construction of the two spans com
pleted south of the river channel
will be utilized In extending
the
steel to the south abutment, and It
Is expected this will be reached by
the end of next week.
NEW STRIKE ON YELLOW BOY.
Herman Wundrum Brings in Some
Fine Ore.
Herman Wundrum Is In the city
from the upper Snake river, whers
he has been engaged in the develop
ment of the Yellow Boy mine, and is
shewing some fine specimens of
ouartz taken from a strike recently
made on the property.
Th*f ore 1 b very similar in charac
ter to the rich gold-bearing quartz
which brought the property into
prominence a few years ago. A sam
ple of the strike is now be'ng assay
ed. and it is expected a good report
will be made. The new vein was
tapped at a depth of 200 feet, and
the ledge Is about three feet wide.
'WIRELESS WORKS
a " RANGE!
PENSACOLA PICKS UP THE
FLEET AND EXCHANGES
NE WS WITH ADMIRAL EVANS
ACROSS GULF AND CONTINENT
WASHINGTON, March 11.— j
About the last place that the navy
department expected to hear from 1
the Atlantic battleship flotilla for at
least six months was on the Atlantic
coast, yet this is what has happened.
The navy department has received
a telegraphic message from its wire
less station at Pensacola which has !
been in direct communication with (
the battleship fleet, a most remarka- !
ble performance, considering that
the wireless Impulses were obliged
to traverse the Gulf of Mexico, then
cross overland the state of Texas,
part of Mexico, and again traverse
several hundred miles of ocean.
This particular message was from
Rear Admiral Thomas, in command
of the second division, and was as
follows:
"Have you any important news
from home?"
An additional dispatch received at
Pensacola from Admiral Thomas,
dated on board the Minnesota at 8
o'clock last night, is as follows:*
"The position of the fleet at this
I moment is latitude 14.37 north, Ion-!
gitude 102.01 west."
Admiral Pillsbury, chief of the
navigation bureau, stales that the
feet is less than 900 miles from
Magdalena bay.
It is moving at the rate of 10%
knots per hour, which is 1% knots
j more per hour than was estimated
| when the ships left Callao. This
w,u pi«, the .hl« Ip M..d.l.h,
bay on Thursday morning, two days
- ......
ahead of schedule time.
REPORT JUSTIFIES
ROOSEVELTS' ACT
DISCHARGE OF NEGRO TROOPS
BECAUSE OF BROWNSVILLE
RIOT UPHELD BY SENATE RE
PORT JUST SUBMITTD.
WASHINGTON, March 11.—In !
connection with the report of the
senate committee on military affairs ,
on the Brownville riot made to the
senate today, the president trans
mitted a message in which he said
the facts set forth in his order dis
missing negro soldiers had been
substantiated by the testimony be
fore the committee.
He recommended that the time
for the reinstatement of the dis
charged soldiers, which has expired,
be extended for one year^ in order
to permit the president to reinstate
any of the discharged men who did
not fall within the terms of his dis
missal.
I
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Senate Studies Hague Treaty.
is
WASHINGTON, March 11.—Sec
retary Root proposed to the senate
committee on foreign relations that,
It ratify the pending Hague treaty
providing for general arbitration,,
by adopting a provision that all the
issues to be arbitrated must be sepa-i
rately submitted to the senate.
Favorable reports were ordered
on the treaties respecting the rules
of war on land and prohibiting proj
ectiles from balloons. ,
Last Spike in North Bank.
STEVENSON, Wash., March 11.
—The driving of the spike that
formally heralds the completion of
the Spokane, Portland and Seattle
railroad, from Pasco to Vancouver.
Wash., occurred today. There was
no elaborate ceremony.
Chicago Wheat Market.
CHICAGO, March 11—Wheat:
Vrv. 93% c; July, 89A4c; Septem
ber, 86A4c.
IDAHO FINANCES
IN GOOD SHAPE
STATE TREASURER HASTINGS
CONVEYS THE MOST CREER
FUL NEWS TO HIS CORRE
SPONDENTS ON W ATT. STREET
The finances of the state of Idaho
are In excellent shape, according to
a statement recently issued by State
T'easuier C. A. Hastings, and in the
financial uncertainty that has pre
vaijed throughout the country it is
not a bad Idea to make note of tha
fact and use it for boosting the Gent
of the Mountains. Treasurer Has
tings is not the kind of a man to let
such an opportunity slip, and the
following letter from his office ad
dressed to the Hanover National
bank of New York city is designed
to spread the cheerful news even
to the confines of Wall street. The
text of the letter is ns follows:
"Almost all of the state of Ida
ho's indebtedness is payable through
your bank and in the course of a
year's transactions I have had a
great many of your checks pass
through my office, so I infer you
nnls t he interested in Idahos finan
! c * al condition.
| ''Our tax levy due from the 22
; counties of the state was $750,000.
This amount is due almost any time
£ h.Tn^
InslJe of 30 da y® Ume the amount
nf nnnnfri tnves will not ernee A 2
in the months of January or Febru
ary. That Is, there is no compulsory
time for payment with penalty at
tached.
"With the exception of $15,000
due from Ada county, who had her
money in the Captai State bank at
the time of Its temporary suspen
sion, 96 per cent of the total amount
of taxes due the state are paid, and
!
of unpaid taxes will not exceed Z
per cent.
I "Aside from the Capital State
! bank of this city, not a bank In th#
state has suspended, and in all
! probability the Capital State bank
will reopen in 30 days. Not a de
I poaltor will lose a cent and hardly
j a dollar of their capital stock will
j be Impaired, although they may low
I their surplus of $100,000.
"I have on hand today $1,20<L*
000, the major portion of which la
deposited In 80 banks throughout
' the state, and I am in almost dally
: touch with every bank In the state,
: and they are all In a cheerful mood
and their statements are all fine,
The promptness with which taxes
are paid Is a reflex of the condition*
throughout this state."
ROADS ENFORCE
REGULATIONS
All conductors and trakemen In
the employ of the Northern Pacific
company are required to sign a
statement to the effect that they
have been off duty for a period of
10 hours or more before they are
permitted to go out on trains.
This is the order that has become
, effective on this division during^ the
past few days, and the record is pre
served by the railway company to
eliminate the possibility of prosecu
tions for violating the law requiring
! trainmen to be given not less than
10 hours' rest after a stated number
of hours on the road.
BAR ANARCHY
FROM FDNERAL
CHICAGO. March 11.—Anarchy
being repugnant to the Jewish race
and forbidden In the tenets of their
religion, Olga Averbuch has protect
ed against the anarchists taking
part In the ceremonies incidental
the removal of her brother's
from the potters' field to the Jew*
ish cemetery. ^

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