OCR Interpretation


Lewiston inter-state news. (Lewiston, Idaho) 1905-1906, April 25, 1905, Image 3

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091110/1905-04-25/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 3

RELATES
OLDEN
TIMLLE6EN0
Rcv ; James Hayes, Nez Perce
Indian Divine Talks at
Walla Walla.
Re% . James Hayes, the well known
, Perce Indian divine, who has been
| n ^alla Walla attending the session
of the Presbytery at that place, was in
t'erivewed by a Walla Walla Untor
reporter. Rev. Hayes in his versatile
ma nner managed to keep pace with
inquisitive reporter by relating some
,,f the prehistoric legends that has been
handed down through the tribe for
generations.
A reporter called upon him, says*
,he Union, and requested an explan
ation of the Ne» Perce profession of
faith prior to their knowledge of the
existence and character of the Bible.
■ Those were our dark days," he re
plied. "Really it was thought in the
olden time that if one died other than
in fighting, he passed away very much
the same as an animal.
•]f, however, he tVas killed fairly
and squarely in battle he went to
what is generally referred to
•happy hunting grounds.'
"Can you relate "a Nez Perce legend
ihat would prove entertaining?" asked
the reporter.
"There are a number," he responded,
"but one of the most popular runs as
follows: It was told me by an Indian
and in turn was related to him by
some ancient member of the race.
•Afar back in the ages there dwelt
on the lands of the Nez Perce Indians
an animal so large that his size was
quite unmeasurable. However, to in
dicate the creature's bigness I will say
that he was seven miles in length and
1hree miles in width. His mouth was
so situated that it always faced to
wards the east and it was his habit
to swallow all birds and animals that
came towards him from the rising of
the sun' This being was the chief of
all animals and he was a fearful men
ace to the country.
"Now down upon the Pacific coast
there lived a great chief who was
known by the name of Coyote; and
Coyote was summoned to rid the land
of this colossal and dreaded inhabi
tant. It is said that Coyote came up
by way of the Columbia and. In the
course of his Journey passed through
the Walla Walla valley. On seeing
this prodigious being, whose name was
Ills Wouetse, Coyote at first concealed
himself to the end that he might esti
mate the size of his enemy. Hut at
last he spoke, saying, 'Ills Wouetse.'
The creature looked up. and then there
was the deadly understanding between
them. Ills Wouetse was the first to
speak, saying, 'remain where you are:
1 do not wish to swallow you.' Coyote
replied, 'you have devoured all of my
fripnds and I do not wish to he left
in the world alone.' Thereupon the
gigantic animal opened his ponderous
mouth and admitted Coyote who trav
eled straight for his heart. He carried
five sharp knives and Indian fire. On
reaching the vital organ he carved it
with his knives, then built a hot .and
consuming fire. This proved a death
blow to the. hideous and dangerous
creature, as It struggled for a time
and then ceased to exist. Coyote there
U|»on proceeded to liberate all of the
birds and animals.
Following them out. he cut off the
the left lower leg of the animal and
sent it to the Sioux tribe. Bj reason of
s the ,
Good Health
to
Children especially are fond of dainties,
and the housekeeper must look carefully
to their food.
As good cake can be made only with
good egg», so also a cake that is health
ful as well as dainty must be raised with
a pure and perfect baking powder.
Royal Baking Powder is indispensable
in the preparation of the highest quality
of food. It imparts that peculiar light
ness, sweetness and flavor noticed in the
finest cake, biscuit, doughnuts, crusts, etc.,
and what is more important, renders the
food wholesome and agreeable to young
and old.
MVM. IWIM POWDC" CO. ktW VO««.
this action, the Sioux became a very
tall race. The thign was given to the
Crows and they developed Into robust
and enduring runners. A forearm was
sent to the Rlackfoot Indians and they
became powerful to pull the bow. An
uper arm was furnished to the Ban
nock Indians that make them strong
in all athletics.
"And," added Mr. Haynes, with an
expression that verged upon a smile,
the stomach was given to the Spokane
Indians and they have been hungry
ever since."
Rev. Hayes was delighted with the
interruption by his wife and then con
tinued his narrative.
"Finally all of the monstrous animal
was given away, and Coyote stood
alone wondering what to do next. At
this moment he was accosted by a fox
"bo said, 'Coyote, you have given ev
thejerything away and you have left noth
with blood. He turned and sprinkled
ing for the Nez Perce Indians.'
"The great chief from the coast
seemed surprised for a time, then gaz
ed at his hands which were dripplni
the earth with the animal's life blood.
It resulted in the Nez Perce Indians
becoming the greatest .of fighters."
At this reference to his tribe be
#ave veiit to a laugh.
According to Rev. Hayes the Nez
Perce reservation contains a popula
tion of 1,500 or' 1,600 and supports
six Indian churches. He states that
he. preaches twice on Sundays and
twice during the week, and has been
actively engaged as a minister during
the past 18 years.
He claims that he has more success
with the youth of his race than with
the adults w ho are harder to convince.
Two girls and a boy complete the
membership of his family.
He Is the most noted of all the Nez
Perce Indian missionaries, and he has
scored more than ordinary success
through preaching to other tribes.
Raise Money for Armory.
Genesee, Idaho, April 24.—Company
H, national guard of Idaho, has origi
nated a rather novel plan to erect an
armony. At a recent meeting practi
cally all of the 55 members agreed
to apply tow-ard stock In the company
to be organized all the money they
will receive for services at the encamp
ment to be held In July.
In this manner about $1.500 can be
raised. An additional sum of $400 will
be secured from the maintenance fund.
Plans for the building have already
been secured. In size it will be 40x100
feet and will be so constructed that
it can be used for all meeting purposes.
A 26x40 foot stage will be a feature.
While no definite site for the location
of the building has as yet been select
ed. it will probably be placed In.the
eastern part of town. The building
complete/! would cast about $3.000.
Wheat Conditions Fine.
Mohler, Idaho, April 24.—Wheat oon->
ditlons never looked better on Nez
Perce prairie. For the past two or
three days rains have been falling over
the entire prairie. The acreage this
year will be about the same, or per
haps a little larger than last year.
The five weeks' old baby of Mr. and
Mrs. C. A. Wann is seriously ill with
a cold and fears are expressed for its
recovery.
Lack of Funds in Land Office.
Washington, April 24.—On account
of the shortage of last year's appropri
ation Commissioner Richards of the
general land office has found it neces
sary to dispense temporarily with the
services lot 17 of the 80 special agents
of that bureau. They have been merely
furloughed and will be restored to the
service when the new appropriation
becomes available on July 1 next.
RECLAIM
PRIVATE LANDS
Hardly a Project Found that Does
Not Contain Lands of that
Character
Washington, April 241—The reclama
tion act was Intended primarily to pro
vide for the irrigation of lands belongi
ng to the United States. It was plain,
however, to congress, that •scoT'cgly
'any project would be cound in which
there was not a considerable amount
of private lands.
The experience of the reclamation
service has shown that In the most
inaccessible localities In the west more
or less private lands are encountered
In the development of the projects.
The majority of the projects which
have been under consideration, and
among them some that are practically
new discoveries. Involve, in the area
to be Irrigated, a considerable amount
of private land.
The proper manner of dealing with
these private lands has been a difficult
question to solve, having In view the
interests of the United States on the
one hand, and of the private land hold
ers on the other.
The means adopted for the organiza
tion of water users' associations in
volve a specific recognition of prior
vested water rights, and those who
are in position to claim such rights
nre left undisturbed as to such claims,
the requirements of the government
simply calling for their proper share
of the cost of construction of the nec
essary Irrigation works.
In order to protect such project»
of the government from a» monopoly
of the land owners or water users,
congress has provided that no right
to use of water shall be sold for more
than 160 ncres of land In private ow
nership to any one person, and, fur
ther, that the land owner must be a
resident on the land or In the neighbor
hood and that no such water right
shall permanently attach until all pay
ments therefor shall be made.
This Involves a limitation upon the
use of private lands while the right
for the use of the water Is being paid
for. In view, however, of the fact that
!
!
I
i
j
j

j
j
:
!
1
!
;
I
the watei . H ght furnished bv the gov
„„Ko-™- .u
eminent enhances the value of the
land in a proportion far greater than
the actual payments required, by the
government, the private land bwners j
cannot properly complain of those re- !
strictions which will be' placed upon j
hint during the period of 10 years while ;
he is paying for the water right. i
When the government says: "I
charge you $20 an acre in 10 annual j
installments of $2 each, without Inter
est or profft. to furnish water to vour
land, which is now worth $10 an acre. :
on condition that you live on It or in
the neighborhood during 10 years," the
land owner cannot complain If he ac
cepts the offer knowing that, as a re
sult, his land will have a ready sale
at $100 per acre and more.
UNIVERSITY FINANCE
State Board of ExdVniners Must Act on 1
All Claims.
;
In a letter to State Auditor R. S.
Bragaw. the attorney general hau given
a very important opinion with relation
to the financial management of the
state university. Heretofore the board
of regents bus passed upon all bills and
drew the money from the state treas
ury in large sums as needed. Under
Mr. Guheen's Interpretation of the law
university claims must take the usual
course of other claims and be passed
upon by the state board of examiners
before they will be paid. The state au
ditor has already advised the univer
sity officials of the new order.
The attorney general's opinion fol
lows: j
Boise. Idaho. April 17. 1905. Hon. I
Robert S. Bragaw, State Auditor. Boise |
Idaho. Sir: Replying to your Inquiry
relative to your duty with reference to
certain requisitions made by the hoard |
of regents of the University of Idaho
for money appropriated to said univer
sity, I have to say that I find no law
authorizing you to draw warrant» upon
the treasurer for money* In his pos
session appropriated to the university
I upon requisition of the hoard of re
I gent*, but upon the other hand, it is
> expressly provided that you should
draw warrants upon all stated funds or
appropriations only upon the presenta
tion of proper vouchers or claims In
favor of the parties entitled thereto,
which have been approved by the
board of examiners, as provided by
law ami claims against the state In
curred in the manegement of the uni
versity are not excepted from this
mode of procedure.
j It is njy view under existing late
that you should draw warrants u|K>."
funds and appropriation* belonging to
the university only after claims in
curred In the management of the uni
versity have been allowed by the board
of examiners. and warrants should
then he drawn In favor of the parties
entitled thereto. I am
fully. J. J. OITHEEN.
Attorney Genera)
very respect -
Spring Plowing Don«
If you want your lots plowed andj
harrowed in good shape call on Jake
Sharroh. Phone 2294; residence'712 Q
street. 4*f,
State of Ohio, City of Toledo, Lucas
County, ss.
Krank J. Cheney makes oath that he
is senior partner of the firm ôf F. J.
Cheney & Co., doing business In the
City of Toledo. County and State
aforesaid, and that said firm will pay
the sum of ONE HUNDRED DOL
LARS for each and 'very case of
Catarrh that ,:«n not be cured by the
use of Hall's Catarrh Cure.
FRANK'J. CHENEY.
Sworn to before me and subscribed
in my presence, this 6th day cf Decem
ber, A. D. 1886.
(Seal) A. W. GLEASON,
Notary Public.
Hall's Catarrh Cure Is taken intern
ally, and acts directly on the blood and
mucous surfaces of the system. Send
for testimonials free.
F. J. CHENEY & Oo„ Toledo. O.
Sold by all Druggists, 75c.
Take Hall's Family Pills for eonstl
pation. *
Pays $8,000 for 320 Acres.
Palouse, Wash. April 24.—Belvall &
Davis, of this place have sold to D. F.
Trimble, of Colfax, $20 acres, six miles
east, along the river at Kennedy's ford,
for $8.000. Mr. Trimble sold a half
section near here only a month ago
and purchased again for an Invest
ment.
To Cure a Cold in On# Day
Take Laxative Bromo Quinine Tab
lets. All druggists refund the money
If it fails to cure. E. W. Grove's signa
ture is on each box. 25c. tf
O Ö
O COMING EVENT8 O
o o
OCOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXX)
Thursday, June 1.—The Lewis and
Clark Centennial exposition will open
at Portland and continue until October
15th.
Sunday, June 11.—The American
Medical association will convene for
four days séssion at Portland.
Thursday. June 29.—The National
Woman Suffrage association will begin
a week's session at Portland.
...SEE...
POTVÜN & NINNEMAN
Real Estate, Loam
and Insurance
LEWISTON.
IDAHO
Thatcher & Kling
7
J

J
will!...........——------------
j EUGENE GASSER & CO.
° enera ' Commission Merchants and
: ln klnd8 of Harden a*>d
Will Ssve You
MONEY on
WALL PAPER
1
Field Seeds, Hay, Bran
ley, etc.
806 East Main 8treet, Lewiston, Idaho
• t« es#*e«e«e»e-»e*e*e*e-»e-»i
Î PALM CANDIES i
: At ED. L. WIGGIN'S (
Î CIGAR STORE J
; • ♦
t*t*e»e*e*4»e*(»t*e»e«e*t*
Shorts, Bar
Coeui d'Alene Market
F. B. SEARS * CO.
Froth and Saltad M«ati at Who to
tal. and Ratail. Fi*h and Gama
VV »'" Work*, Sewerage. Municipal Im
ptovMnenw, Irrigation and Power Plants
MILLER & WRIGHTER
OVIL ENGINEERS
OFF. CITY MALI — LEWISTON IDAHO
P Konti 1491—1871
branch office* —410 W.ehnyton Block,
Seattle Wash; 76 Jamisou, Bltlg,Spokane,
Wash.; 12 Judd Bldg. Pendleton, Ore.
M F. WILLIAMS, Optician
OPPOSITE TEMPLE THEATRE
EXAMINATIONS FREE
Forch Columns
We have received a car
load of porch columns —
built r.p and solid — alii
lengths and shape* We,
| wou ld like tO show the Stock.
j
'
Bartlett & Cox
It's No Jojce for the Coaf Ü
He sells less coal when you patronize the Lts
Glair, for it doesn't require ihe kitchen
range to be kept at full speed Monday and
Tuesday to get your clothes washed and iron
ed. You will save money and much trouble;
If you Id the Leriair Laundry do year WM t
wa ti i i Mw i miiimt i iiHinimi i iW i
°h
IRNSEl&NEVT
%
•froit»
INSURE WITH US
Fire
Life
Accident
Surety Bonds
Lumber of All Kinds
I . .
We can now fill all orders. SLAB
WOOD—good Red Fir. Now is your
time to order. Phone No. 1751
Lewiston Lumber Co. |j
United States Smelting Co
BALT LAKE CITY UTAH
Lead and Copper Ores
THE UNITED STATES SMELTING COMPANY is mow ln the mar
ket for all kinds of lead and copper ores at PRICES FAVORABLE
TO SHIPPTR8. ADDRESS ALL COMMUNICATIONS TO.
Salt Lake City, Utah
CONSIGN ALL SHIPMENTS AS FOLLOWS: United State« Smelt
ing Co., BINGHAM JUNCTION, UTAH. When ahlpmM* is mad*
please NOTIFY US PROMPTLY and If PUBLIC SAMPLER, to pre
ferred. DESIGNATE WHICH ONE also designate ONE ASSAXER.
I » »»» M ilSi
Going for a Drive? If you are get a Rig at tka
Boss Livery Feed & Sale Stabte i
Good Rigs, and Careful Drivers. We Buy
and Sell Hirses.
42 C Street, Lewiston, Idaho Phone
1 1 « »♦♦♦♦S S #!•••♦♦« SI B—p»
W. F. KETTENBACII, President J. AIEXAM>E*. Vtoe Presto**
GEORGE H. KESTER. Cashier
The Lewiston National Bank
LEWISTON. IDAHO
Corner of Mato end Fourth St*
C. C. Bunnell,
DIRECTORS
J. Alexander, J. B. Morri*. W. P. Kettenkae*.
George II, Keefer, Grace PfeffMn Keltntock;
RC
TRANSACTS GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS
'Sight Exchange «old «a a I the principal cille« of the United Stole» aid Farapr.
The Horseshoe Lunch Counter
For First Class Meals
Open Day and Night
Second End Main Streets Phone 251L
Lewiston Furniture and Under
taking Company
J. C. Harding D cssie E. Harding
Funeral Directors, and
Emhalmers
Night Phone 821;
Day Phone 821
;
j
CASTOR IA
TSr Infants and Children.
Tbc KM Ym liin Always Bwfht.
Basra the
Pfutmef
Cl RC U LAP
FOR KAtt FURS
loMcMIllAN FüH X A001 C

xml | txt