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Montpelier examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho) 1895-1937, April 04, 1896, Image 3

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091111/1896-04-04/ed-1/seq-3/

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HÂVE CHANGED THEIR MINDS
&
Manufacturers Will Turn to
Silver at Last
TlteirCOnl* »al« at Ion-Teller Tell*
Monte Truth« That They Will Find
to be of Benefit to Thriu—Mennior
May« They are the * Mo* I
Persistent. Lobbyist* In WaNliinu
<on—llnselflshneats of tin* Bold- Pro
ducing West.
■i
Washington, March 31 —The action
of the Manufacturers' club of Philadel
phia in repudiating the idea that the
club was for free coinage, ano ii
dialing the conference here of certain
manufacturers as representing the views
of the club, brought out some comments
tonight from Senators Teller and Can
repu
n©n.
Senator Teller said : "I
prised at the action of the club. I never
thought that the club was for silver. Of
the gentlemen who came here t-ome
were for free coinage, some for bimetal
ism and some for the gold standard. I
know, however, that eventually the man
ufacturers will have more interest in tin
free coinage of silver than my own täte
or any other class of men."
"Why do you say so?"
"Because the present mon eta .y svs
an automatic tariff to
not sur
I
tern is acting
t ep our manufactured articles out of
other countries. The manufacturers
will find after a little that they can't
vith
compete with Oriental countries
the system as it is, and that thui
also be driven out of their own
kets."
Senator Cannon said: "I was
v il 1
mar
prised at that'portion of the reioluti
which contai
manufacture
ption that the
the ass
are the only persons who
for legislation in their
Wash
do not bargai
own behalf. My experience in
.ngton has been that they are the
rslstent lobbyists who
ington . As far as the west is concerned
we are not selfish on this question.
now producing more gold than sh
ave should con
ost
• to Wash
We
are
If this Asiatic
ver.
tinue, we would be benefited more than
any other people,
want to see
they will die 'ly inches,
ical countries will never consent to it."
If the manufacturers
international agreement,
The mom
ch
Tomorrow is the last day upon which
the American Falls Canal company of
Idaho can file with the secretary of the
interior papers in the case of the Peo
ple's Canal company against the state of
Idaho. Commissioner of the General
Land Office Lamoreaux advised that tin*
case be dismissed, and pending Secre
lerican
tary Smith'* decision, the A
Fall's company asked for a
an extension of time before ihe case
should be finally closed,
ment is not on file In the department
d received
If the state
vill doubtless be
tomorrow, the matter
settled. Mr. Ben. Rich and others in
ipressed the
terested in the case have
opinion that the matter will be closed up
within a day or two.
Senator Btown has introduced a reso
lution in the senate providing for the
printing of 5000 additional copies of the
publication on
of the -Mercur district.
the economical geology
The senator
receipt of many letter* from
f this publica
printed,
hich lie
has been i
Utah asking for copies
tion, and as only 500 had bee
he offered the resolution,
Senator Teller
secured an additional
expects to get passed,
some time ago
5000 copies of the Cripple Creek dis
trict. the chairman of the printing
committee will favor the report of the
Mercur pamphlet.
Mrs. Ryan, first cousin
Dubois of Idaho, died this
her residence on Thirteenth st
to Senator
ing at
L't.
Ida., is
Dr. J. H. Bean, of Pocatelli
is the city, temporarily stopping
Secretary Carlisle.
Wyoming patents: John H. Gordon,
South Bend, irrigation shovel ; Freder
ick Kindt, Saratoga, and J. C. Davis
apparatus for preventing sink
Ising sunken
fill
Rawlins,
lng of ships and for
vessels.
Another Investigation Anted For.
Washington, March 3«. — Représenta
today
live Shuford of North Carolid
to investigate
introduced a resolutioi
the recent sale of bonds
The re*olution
1 made that
advantages
cites that charges have beci
unfair and
inprecedented
ded bv Président Cleve
have been acc<
land and Secretary Carlisle
financial syndicate located in New York
City, and that charges have been made
against the president and secretary of
the treasury in regard to the recent
bond sale, wherein the same syndicate
secured
a certaii
irly one-half of the bond
issue in a mysterious and suspicious
manner. The resoluton then provides
that a committee of five be appointed by
the speaker to make an investigation
into all the circumstances relating to the
last three issues of bonds and report to
the house.
Blessed by Ihe
Pop«*.
— Cardinal
Ycrk, March so.
Satolli, the papal delegate to th United
States, has written a letter to Rev. Win
sYnith. S P M. of the Fathers of Mercy.
Vincent D« Paul's ch
New
•h. this citv, 1
1 1 o I v father has
forming hi.n that the
extended h * blessing to the pilgrims
Brooklyn for Lourde*
he
>at houses and
»his ft; v North park
ing ice.
about to sta* t ii
and other sanctuaries.
Damaged bi Roving lee.
Oshkosh, Wis., March 30.- Rail
a gale broke the ice bn Lake Winnc
Sunday and it was ciuven on to the
shore in gieat mas'-e'k piling up
height of twenty or Air*y feet,
were uprooted and huVe boulders we
moved like pebbles. \îc
all structures along fcjc shores *
wrecked and in
suffered greatly from tl
: and
ïbago
tu
Trees
mo
Big: Hleel Combine.
Pittsburg, Pa., March 29—A gigantic
industrial combine went through the
preliminary stage of formation and was
practically effected at a meeting of steel
producers held in New York last week.
Another meeting will be held in Pitts
burg for the arrangement of details. It
is proposed to regulate the*production of
steel to actual requirements by methods
similar to those used by the rail pool.
Not much information will be given for
publication, but it is learned from one
of the attendants at the meeting that at
the start the price of the billets will be
*d at $20 per ton and will be changed
according to the price changes of raw
materials. Pending completion of the
combination, steel producers have with
drawn from the market and will make
no new contracts.
Nearly the entire production of the
United States was represented at the
New York meeting, embracing capital
of several hundied million dollars
Among the prominent firms present
were the Carnegie Steel company, Jones
& Laughlin, Illinois Steel company,
Hainsworth Steel company, Bethlehem
Steel company, Johnston Steel company
and Combria Iron works.
a
■i
4'leveland Not In the Race.
New Y >rk, March 27.—A special to
I lie World from Boston says: Congress
man A. S. Berry of Kentucky, who is a
member of the congressional delegation
which is inspecting Boston harbor, said
last night: "I can say very positively
that President Cleveland is not in the
race at all. 1 have good reason to know
that when the time comes ire will an
nounce that fact. In fact, a paper of
such a nature was prepared by him some
time ago, but at the request of the
national committee, who felt that was
not the most opportune time for it to be
given out, he consented to withhold it
for a time."
LAUNCHING OF THE IOWA
Not
Hitch in the Sliding of
the Ways.
4*ov. Dt-nUeVt Daughter Broke the
Bottle of 4'hniiiimgne, and the Mon*
mer Mild into the Deep, Where her
Life l ien.
Philadelphia, March 28.—The launch
of the battleship "Iowa" from Cramp'r
shipyard today partook more of the na
ture of a national event than any simi
lar one since Mrs. Cleveland christened
the "St. Louis" nearly two years ago.
Vice-President Stevenson headed the
delegation from Washington which in
cluded Secretary of the Navy Herbert,
Attorney-General Harmon, Secretary of
Agriculture Morton, and a large party of
senators and congressmen.
The Iowa party was led by Gov.Drake,
whose daughter, Mary Lord Drake,
broke the bottle of champagne over the
vessel's prow and u,ave it it's name.
Miss Drake is a handsome blonde of
commanding figure. She wore a dress o
green plaid, with a cape of velvet trim
med with chinchilla fur, a gray toque
with gray and black plumes, and gray
silk gloves. When she baptised the ves
sel she stood on u little stand raised
above the bow platform, and on either
side of her were Henry W Cramp and
Miss Herbert, daughter of the naval
sécrétai - v.
The b
ich was entirely successful.
It was exactly 1 o'clock inthe after
hen the last block was knocked
aw ay and the marine monster began her
brief journey. Following Mr. Cramp's
instructions, Miss Drake grasped the be
ribhoned bottle, and as the mighty hull
began to glide down the ways she crush
it against the prow. The "Iowa" slipped
gracefully down into the middle of the
stream, and the tremendous crowd let
out a mighty roar, w hile the near-by fac
tories and the eraft which dotted the
river opened their shrill whistles.
After the launch there was an inform
al luncheon in the mould-loft, but
vere made.
at
is
An Unknown Man t-rouud so Death
at I*. V. Junction.
Pleasant Valley Junction, Utah,
March 27. -J. Aloes, a transient, was
crushed under train No. 19 today abou t
o'clock and instantly killed. For several
days he has been hereabouts, ostensibly
looking for work; today he was heard to
ask if a freight train would soon be along
going to Salt Lake. On the arrival of
No. 19 he was seen to take an overcoat
effort to get on the rods
under the car. He rode about 100 yards
w hen he called to a tramp, w ho was also
beating his wav, to try to stop the train,
vas fallii
of
by
the
to
lake ai
and
Ii
another moment
•K r *
his body was under the wheels. The
top of the head was mashed off, his en
tire body horribly crushed and man
gled. The jury
Craner exonerated the crew,
summoned by Justice
the testi
tnony showed that they were
ay
responsible for the accident. A small
book, a pair of spectacles and 35 cents in
cash were found in his pockets. He
looks to be of Germai
or Jewish de
scent.
has
Pledged For Prohibition.
Topeka, Kan , March 29.—The Kan
sas State Temperance union has decided
upon a plan of political action for the
coming campaign. It proposes to secure
a written pledge from 30,000 voters that
they will not vote for any candidate who
is not openly pledged to the enforcc
ment of the prohibitory law\ The idea
he is that 30,000 voters pledged to this con
dition will constitute the balance of
power in Kamas political affairs, and
and can either secure their demand or wreck
any ticket which refuses to take the
park required pledge. The work of securing
signatures has commenced.
and
ïbago
MORE SPANISH CRUELTIES
of
for
was
man
lect
Said- to Surpass the Worst of
the Armenian Outrages
And be of Dally Oeenrrebee—Menor
De Lome Insists That the Reports
are Tery Mach Exaggerated.
Washington, D. C., April 1.—The
message from Havana giving the details
of the killing of five prisoners by the
garrote raised a cry of horreur in Wash
ington. Senor Dupay de Lome, the
Spanish minister, admitted that the men
had been killed, but declared that the
form o i punishment was the one pre
scribed by Spanish law. jrle said the
men were negroes and had Ifieen guilty
of a most atrocious crime in hanging
a merchant at Guira Melena, and in kill
ing a email hoy at the same place. He
said the details of the execution had
been exaggerated.
The reports to the Cubans in Wash
ington declare that the horrible execu
tion of the five men at Havana It but a
sample of the atrocious cruelties of Cap
tain-General Weyler in Cuba. They de
clare that they have information indi
cating that such cruelties ire practiced
nearly every day ia Cuba, and that they
are e > horrible as to be beyond compre
hension.
Senor Quesada, who represents the
Cuban party in Washington, said such
Incidents as the one reported today
only gave a vague idea of Ihe reign of
terror that is now in progress on the
island. He continued:
"Atrocities are being committed every
week in Cuba that surpass in cruelty
the worst Armenian outrages over
which such a storm of popular indigna
tion was raised in this country. The
cruelties reported la this execution will
be denied by the Spanish authorities
and the denial will be believed by the
American people because they cannot
coneelve how such crimes can be com
mitted by a civilized nation. The Span
ish authorities are conducting in Cuba
today exactly the same sort of warfare
that the Apache Indian!» in Arizona
waged twenty yoars ago on the frontier.
They are mutilating their victims in
exactly the same way and are using the
most barbarous methods of warfare.'
Senor Quesada said he had no doubt
that the five men put to death bad been
guilty of some offense against the Span
ish rule and that perhaps theii offenses
merited the death penalty, but no matter
what their offense was, they were en
titled to a reasonably humane punish
ment. The fact that they were put to
death in itself is not revolting, for they
may have deserved it, but that they
were tortured in the most barbarous
manner should arouse the indignation
of all civilization.
He continued: "We do not ask the
American people to lookjto the events
of the present war to form their conclu
sions about Spanish cruelty. It is a
matter of history and the history that
records just such cruelties
written by Cubans or by Spaniards, but
by Englishmen and Frenchmen. We
can well understand that any reports the
Cubans may spread in the United States
at this time about Spanish cruelties will
be looked upon as prejudiced and un
fair. For that reason we have not at
tempted to keep the American people
advised of their atrocities. The Spanish
are in control on the island of Cuba and
All
tain
into
a
loss
a
all
It
not
they exercise a censorship over tho tel
egraph and mail that prevents a true
statement of the affairs there being
knot
, but the truth will come out gen
erally and the people of this
will put a stop to the w arfare in time."
''When Spain sent Weyler to Cubait
hoped his presence in Cuba would
terrorize the Cubans and that he would
ntry
put a speedy end t© the war the minute
he put his foot on the island. He male
his reputation in Barcelona, where he
crushed out the anarchists. His control
of Cuba, howe'
was a grave mistake,
because his methods of w arfare will be
come known in time and civilized peo
ple will not tolerate hi»."
HUGHE» ORDERED TO VACATE
Authorities at Washing tun in a
Harry to Oait Him.
Washington, April 1.—Acting Secre
tary Reynolds of the interior depart
ment today telegraphed Gov. Hughes of
Arizona that he had been removed from
office, to take effect at <|>nce, and directed'
him to turn over his office to Secretary
Biuce. The telegram was sent in res
ponse to a message from Bruce sa^ ing
Hughes refused to vacate and asking
what he should do.
t
to
of
The dispatches follow':
Louis C. Hughes, Phoenix, Arix: —
You have been removed from the office
of governor. The president directs
that you turn over the office to the Sec
retary at once.
J. M. REYNOLDS, Acting Sec
en
Charles M. Bruce, Secretary of Ari
zona, Phoenix:—Mr. Hughes has been
removed as governor. The president
directs you to take possession of the
office at once as acting governor under
the law'.
J. M. REYNOLDS, Acting Sec.
Phœnix, Ariz., April 1.— L. C. Hughes
this afternoon turned over to Secretary
Bruce the executive offices of the ter
ay
in
He
ritory, reserving, however, any rights
he may have in the premises. Secretary
Bruce brought decided pressure to bear,
de
the
that
who
idea
con
of
and
the
even threatening to send for the United
States marshal to eject the ex-g«vernor
from office. Telegrams
during the day from President Cleveland
and directing Bruce fo take immediate
till late
ere rec« ived
possession, but Hughes held
in the afternoon, when he received a
telegram from the interior department
demanding that he turn over the office
to the secretary.
A California waiter has just received
a legacy of $500,000. This seems to
prove the saying that "everythingcomes
to him who waits."
DOOLY HVCCEEDg CANNON.
Republican State Central Committee
to Fleet a Chairman.
Salt Lake City, March a6.—The re
publican state central committee met in
special seaslon at the committee rooms
of the house of representatives last
night. The committee was called to
gether for the purpose of choosing a
chairman and other officers and prepare
for the coming campaign.
The resignation of Chairman Cannon
was taken from the table and accepted,
Hon. John E. Dooly was chosen chair
man by acclamation; Mrs. Emellne
Wells first vice-president; Wesley K.
Walton second vice-president.
The chairman was empowered to se
lect a secretary..
of
were
ing
than
This
and
club,
to
free
only
free
a
to
the
the
the
the
He
a
de
the
of
the
over
The
will
the
in
the
been
Span
en
to
they
they
the
a
that
but
We
the
States
will
un
at
people
and
SAVA6ES MANfiLE CORPSES
All Whitesiin Flllbuse Dis
trict Killed.
Anxiety Felt for Mettlers— Revolted
NstsbelM Reported to be Manning
Their Troops Near Hnlnwayo and
Threaten an Attaek.
Buluwayo, Matabele, March 2Ö.— Cap
tain Glifford, leading a rescue force, left
here on Thursday and succeeded in
cuing thirty-eight whites who had gone
into laager at Iseaa. This was not ef
fected until after rapolling an attack by
a force of well-armed Matabeles and •in
flicting upon them a heavy loss. The
loss suffered by Gifford's force in the
engagement was one killed and six
wounded.
Captain Sprecklay, who routed a
strong force of Matab«io6 on Thursday,
inflicted a heavy loss upon them, nas re
turned to Buluwayo, bringing with him
a large number of prisoners. He
brings the disastrous intelligence that
all the whites in the Fllibuse district
hare beea massacreed by the natives,
including Messrs. Bently, Adkins, Barag
wanth and Carpenter. The corpses of
those killed were horribly mutilated,
and their faces were burned almoet be
yond recognition. he native police,
who are known to have incited the up
rising, have been disarmed and several
Mntabele spies have been arrested.
A family of eight persons have been
brutally murdered and two prospectors
are missing in the country near
The enemy is reported to be massing
only thirty miles from here, and the
the keenest anxiety is felt at the out
look, and an attack upon the town is
now hourly expected.
ed
all
and
in
heie.l
and
ing
the
VIRED THE FIItHT VOLLEY.
It Was a Harmless One Without
Bullets.
Chicago, 111 ., March 29.—Ballington
Booth's followers in Chicago fired the
first volley for the new American volun
teers this afternoon at a hall on the
West Side, in close proximity to Salva
tion Army headquarters. Majs. Black
hurst and Trumble, who arrived from
New York today to organize the Chi
cago contingent, were greeted with
cheers, mingled with countless, "aniens"
and "hallelujahs" when they explained
the causes of the revolt. They an
nounced their determination to rema'n
loyal to the standard of Mr. and Mrs.
Ballington Booth, and to forever re
nounce all allegiance to the red-breasted
soldiery with which they have been
identified for years. Many former prom
inent members of the Salvation Army
grasped them by the hand and co-oper
ated in the organization of the volun
teers. One hundred others enlisted at
the meeting in the afternoon, and the
number was increased in the evening
As the volunteer officials approached
the hall they were accorded one
tinued ovation by the large crowd of
people who lined the sidewalks for sev
eral blocks.
Maj. Blackhurst was the principal
speaker of the day. As the official
mouthpiece of Ballingtoi
remarks created interest,
said Iinllington Booth had been mis
represented, and that the fundamental
cause of the whole trouble was the fact
that Ballington Mcoth was in too cl
touch with American ideas, which
flicted with those in L<
not
at
to
the
tel
true
being
gen
time."
would
would
ntry
minute
male
he
control
be
peo
Booth, his
The speaker
a
Secre
depart
of
from
directed'
res
ing
asking
The Major confirmed the rumor that
ordered down tlie
flag in a certain office of
hich Bal
Gen. Booth
Americî
the salvation ar
lington Booth had jurisdiction, and to
this incident Maj Blackhurst attributes
the widening of the chi
rated father and son.
vhich sepa

office
directs
Sec
4)oi» viele«!.
Hanke 1
Chicago, March 30. — The supreme
stained
Sec
court of Illinois at Ottawa has
Ari
been
the
under
viction of Frank R. and Charles
ho were
the
J. Meadow croft, bankers, v
found guilty December 14,
receiving deposits when insolvent, pun
ishment being fixed at a fine of $28 each
e year's imprisonment in the
penitentiary. The decision marks the
of the most stubbornly
contested cases that has ever passed
through the courts of Illinois.
1894 of
Sec.
Hughes
ter
and
close of
rights
bear,
United
late
Fnwion Scheme In Texas.
Austin, Tex., March 27.— A report is
irrent here that the leaders of the re
ived
publicans and populists have a scheme
to fuse, the republicans to vote for the
populist nominees for state positions
a
office
and the populists to put republican
electors
their ballots. The figures
show that the combined opposition to
the democrats two years ago b had a ma
jority of over 5,000, and this has been
greatly increased by defections from the
democratic ranks.
received
to
Some poems are bad enough to justify
FREE SILVER VOTED DOWN
re
in
last
to
a
K.
se
Philadelpkia Manufactur
ers' Club Meeting.
Htroag Fight by thfi Friend« of Mi
rer, bat the Essay Outvoted Theos
and Carried the Day.
Philadelphia, March 30.—The Manu
facturers'club of this city held a special
meeting tonight at which resolutions
were voted down favoring the free and
unlimited coinage of silver. The meet
ing was perhaps the largest in point of
attendance the club has ever held. No
sooner had the president's gavel rapped
than Mr. John Convoirse offered a reso
lution to limit speeches to five minutes.
This caused considerable excitement,
and after some discussion an amend
ment to increase it to ten minutes was
adopted.
Rudolph Blakenburg, in a most im
passioned address, presented the resolu
tions, which were the ones subsequently
adopted :
Resolved, That the manufacturers'
club, speaking for its members, emphat
ically denounce as false the statement
made by the friends of free silver and
echoed by these of free trade that our
Philadelphia manufacturers are willing
to barter with the silver senators for the
free ooinage of silver in exchange for
additional protection.
Resolved, That the question of bi
metalism can be permanently settled
only through an international agree
ment, and the Manufacturers' club de
clares Its unalterable opposition to the
free coinage of silver by the United
States alone, flrmly believing that
a policy would result in disaster at
home and dishonor abroad and would
operate to place the country upon the
basis of silver monometalism.
He had no sooner finished when a
dozen men were on their feet clamoring
to be heard. Of these Wharton Parker
and
left
ef
by
•in
The
the
six
a
re
him
He
that
of
be
up
been
the
out
is
:h
recognized. He presented an
amendment to the resolutions. -It favor
ed the free and
ilimited coinage of
at the ratio of 16 to 1 by the inde
pendent action of the United States.
all
This precipitated intense excitement
and cries of "no, no," came from all
parts of the hall. The chairman had
difficulty in maintaining order. Once
restored, however, James Dobson ob
tained the floor and said: "While I was
in Washington, I dared to express my
conviction. If we cannot have interna
tional bimetali8m, let us go it alone."
heie.l He then offered a substitute to the
effect that the club accept the declara
tion of the Minneapolis platform of 1892
and reaffirm it, at the same time express
ing an opinion that international co-op
eration is necessary. A further substi
offered that the club wait until
tute
the 5 t. Louis convention announce its
platform before any stand be taken.
Both substitutes and amendments were
overwhelmingly defeated and the
Blankenburg resolutions were adopted.
the
the
from
Chi
with
an
Mrs.
re
been
prom
Army
volun
at
the
of
sev
official
mis
fact
Kesenteneed to Hang.
Boise, Ida., March 30—Judge Richards
today sentenced James A. Ellington to
hang May 27th for the murder of C. A.
Brigg»- The tragedy occurred in De
cember, 1894. Ellingtoi
at the next term of court and sentenced
to hang May 27th last. An appeal to
the supreme court acted a6 a stay of ex
ecution. The supreme court decided
against him and he will now have to
swing, unless the pardon board inter
feres, which does not seem likely.
convicted
VICTIMS OF THE FLAMKM.
Ton Poraonn Burned to Death In
Brooklyn.
New York April 1—Ten persons ware
burned to death in a fire early this morn
ing at 66 Union street, Brooklyn. The
building
a four-story tenement
Occupied by Italians. The dead
ar|
' WÊÊ
u<t Bubo, wife *ud two children.
CsIabH*, <6/Mr* old.
Nemo T«n*fN. rm> •* UMUSfe
ter Lena, 22; son Dotninirk, 24; and to
days- old baby ; and Cor nnÉli s MiMP«tla f 2&
All met death by 6uffocat{onT 4 |NÉ
and nis family lived on the third floor,
his
the rest on the second. The fourth
floor was unoccupied. The occupants of
the first floor escaped. John Calabria,
husband of Lena Calabria, escaped from
the second floor.
There were many exciting incidents
man, whose name is unknown,
jumped from a window in the third story
and escaped with burns and bruises.
The family of Joseph Estosito, con
sisting of his wife and three children,
were rescued by firemen.
After tlie fire had been extinguished
lohn Calabria was found unconscious*
He had got out of a second-story window
so completely exhausted that he could
further. He will recover. Hit
wife was dead in her apartments. Sub
sequently nine other bodies were found.
When he had somewhat rallied from
the effects of suffocation and heat Cala
bria told the story of how he escaped
and left his wife behind, without a tre
mor, and while he seemed to be some
what dazed, he had a clear conception
of the events of the night. Later he said
that he had tried to carry his wife to the
window and hurt his hands in getting
out. He called for help, but the "house
was red" before the firemen arrived.
The fire is supposed to be the work
incendiary.
that
tlie
of
Bal
to
sepa
go
stained
Charles
were
pun
each
the
the
passed
of
is
re
scheme
the
positions
Nominated 4*overnoi* ol Arizona.
Washington, March 30.—The presi
dent has sent the senate the nomination
of Benjamin J. Franklin, Arizona, to
governor of Arizona.
London, England, has 7,000 miles
streets.
figures
to
ma
been
the
A Kansas woman fearing that
cow will go dry, has canned a lot
milk for the use of her family.
justify
18 IT CBACEEI t.
The Murdered Man Poanil la a Tranv
at Chirac Was Shipped fram Balt
l-ake.
Salt Lake City, March 28.—The dis
covery of a corpse in a trunk at Chi
cago, and It having been ascertained
from the books of the railroad company
that the box was shipped from Salt Lake
City, recalls the sudden disappearance
of Prosser Chazzell about the date of
shipment.
Chazzel came to Salt Lake about
three weeks before the date of his dis
He had been to the dia
Mi
and
of
No
was
im
and
our
the
for
bi
de
the
at
the
a
appearance,
mond mines in South Africa, and when
here carried about with him $2000 or
$3000 worth of diamonds and jewelry.
A woman, also French, whom he called
rife, accompanied him to the city.
He was well educated and dressed like a
his
gentleman, while she was a type of the
French courtesan. Still she seemed
devoted to him, and grieved noticeably
over his disappearance. The day he
dropped out of sight he had an agree
ment to dine with her at 4 o'clock, and
when he failed to keep it, 6he grew
alarmed. It was next day, however, be
fore she reported the matter to the
police, when she did everything, appar
ently, to help the officers trace him.
Not a clue was ever found A week
later the woman left for Paris, where
she is still supposed to be living. She
gave it out that she thought he had
gone there, and intended to follow him.
She afterwards wrote to a Frenchman,
named Leon, here, asking him to go to
the Deseret bank and draw the money
left there by Chazzell, about $2.800.
Leon attempted to do so, but the bank
officials refused to pay it, and the
deposit is there yet. Besides this, Chaz
zell had a safety deposit box In the Utah
National bank fn which he kept his
jewels. When it was opened after his
disappearance, by order of the court,
only a few stones and some pieces of
French money were found. The officers
believed the men who made away with
him got access to the box and nabbed it
of most of Us contents.
HOW THE BODY WAS FOUND
Chicago, March 27.—From the pro
ceeds of a sale of unredeemed freight
the village of Austin last night develop
ed a trunk mystery. In a zinc box her
metically sealed, two residents of that
place discovered the badly decomposed
body of a man to whose identity there
is not the slightest clue. The body was
bent and tied with a strong rop. , and
half destroyed by chloride of lime and
saltpeter. To ascertain who the man
was, where the body came from, who
placed it in the trunk, or what was the
cause of death, the authorities say is an 1
dertaking greater than they recently
have met, and the solution of ' u ~
tery, they assert, is aiflgostä
VH
All that is known Is thflRffl
were shipped into Chicago, unsigned to
G. M. Morgan, 166 Jefferson court.
There is nosuch street number.
:h
an
of
all
had
ob
was
my
the
1892
until
its
were
the
to
A.
De
to
ex
to
inter
THE MATABELE MASSACRE
Fifty or More Whites Said
to Have Been Murdered.
»upholds—The Story
Fleeing to Hti
4'omes That Doer* Fomented tlie
Uprising—Threatens to Become a
Merlons AflTair for threat Britain to
Have on Hand.
In
Capetown, March 27. —Dispatches
from I'-uluwayo, Matabeleland, indicate
that the uprising in that part of the col
ony is very serious. The disturbance is
widespread, becomlug hourly more
alarming. The revoit may spread to
other parts of South Africa. Settlers in
Matabeleland are flocking into towns,
which are being placed in condition for
Reinforcements of mounted
tion for
ware
morn
The
dead
to
f 2&
|NÉ
floor,
itj
mu
kl
fourth
of
from
story
con
window
could
Hit
Sub
found.
from
Cala
escaped
tre
some
said
the
getting
"house
of
e]
]
b
tl
w<
mi
thi
in
Bn
cit
M e m j
to the Commercial
ville, Miss., sa \ s : At two o'clock this
afternoon two massive boilers of the
Planters Oil mill at this place exploded,
wrecking the mill property and causing
the death of five men as follows:
Henry Williams, colored, fireman.
Oliver Humphreys, colored, assistant
ween
fireman.
Isom Freeman, colored, laborer.
Horace Wilkinson, colored, carpenter.
Ed Strasack, white, carpenter.
presi
to be
oi
Injured: Frank Wolfenden, chief en
gineer badly scalded and bruised.
rnbus Washington, colored, burned and
cut by timbers, will die. Tom Brow
colored, badly bruised and burned. Web
Freeman, colored, leg broken. Alexan
der Hughes, scalp wound from flying
Freeman Pendleton, colored,
Cnl
,
lier
lot of
timbers.
broken and otherwise badly hurt.
NICARAiUAR WAR REP0B
Insu-vents Demand the Sur
rendes t h e Government.
Tbe Trouble Likely •• »»read-inter
vention on the Part'of tke Tatted
Btatee Sug*e.ted In the Interest: er
Peace.
Managua, Nicaragua, rla Galveston,
March 30.— Th« peace commission, con
slating of Dr. Prudente Alfero, the vice
president of Salvador, General Confins
of Salvador and Senor; Ramiree, the
Nicaraguan aainiater of foreign affairs,
has returned here from La Poa, where
a conference with the repreeeatatives
of the insurgents Leonlsts, has been
held.
ed by President Zelays
stood to be the absolate surrender of all
arms,payment of all war expenses, and
the surrender of the leaders for trial.
The Insurgents net only refused to
accept these terms, but demanded Pres
Ident Zelaya to turn over to them the
government of Nicaragua,
quently the war will be continued with
renewed bitterness on both sides. There
Is great eacltemnnt her*. Steps are
being taken to reinforce the troops at
the front, and begin an advance on
Leon as soon a, the much seeded sup
plies of ammunition reach the govern
ment forces. The government Is said
to be hard pressed for funds as well as
ammunit.on, which facts are not un
known to the Leonlsts, who are under
stood to be receiving support from Gua
temala and other sources which may
result In complications likely to cause a
general war throughout Central Amer
ica. It Is suggested that this Is a good
opportunity for Intervention upon the
part of the United States, with a view to
bringing about a peaceful settlement of
the question In dispute as a conflict-in
volving all the Central American re
publics would put a ssrious check upon
the business and development of the
natural resources of Central America.
1 8at j on j n
The terms offered and present
are under
Conse
»ENBATION IN MADRID.
Npain Wants as to Define Oar Inten
tlons Toward Cabo.
York, March 28. — A dispatch
from Madrid to the World says: The
news that the conference committee of
Ne
the American congress has agreed u
the senate resolutions grant
ent rights to
the
ie
which
the sooiicr
.. .1er intentions, the bet
ter all concerned.
The newspapers say the ministers
showed yesterday less optimism, and In
timated that they are pushing naval and
military preparations, and have instruct
ed Gen. Weyler to act energetically
before the rainy season begins in May.
The convention of representatives of
the four republican parties, now for
mally joined as the republican union,
adopted resolutions protesting against
any foreign intervention in Cuba or
any modification of Spain's sovereign
rights in the West Indies.
The resolutions conclude with the
declaration that the solution must be
sought in the establishment of colonial
autonomy whenever opportunity offers.
London, March 28.—The Madrid cor
respondent of the Standard says: Pub
lic feeling was running so high against
American interference in Cuba that the
government- will have trouble to con
trol the national anger.
a
to
is
to
in
for
for
Tlie "Gladstone" of America*
Des Moines, Iowa, March 30.—The
first democratic convention to select
delegates to the state convention at
Ottumwa which will choose national
convention delegates met In Webster
City, Hamilton county, Saturday, and
adopted resolutions denouncing the
present
gress, deploring a possibility
ctment of the McKinley law,
ng Horace Boies of Iowa for
iharacterizlng him "the great
f, the Gladstone of America."
e Hawaiian Cable.
cisco, March 30.—Inquiry re
terms upon which an Amer
HI be permited to land a
e Hawaiian islands reveals
it the terms are embodied in
ed by the Hawaiian legiala»
4
Trmrria subsidy of $40,000
t iding he should obtain an
ly from the United States
Chauilfr Explains.
I N. II., April
uday wrote Senator Lodge
the action of the state
:ndo
—Senator
con
both Reed and Me
lank was a conces
R to the McKinley
^Chandler says he
Concession, though he
p^j^ave been cowardly, as the
outnumbered the McKinley
He explains that the leader of the
this
the
of
sen Lid
acqlK
knoJj
Reed
men.
McKinley forces prepared the resolu
tions and proposed to make a fight for
them.
The candidates for places
the National delegation were all well
known Reed men and sure of election
on
by acclamation if no fight was precipi
tated in the convention, so he thought
it best to allow the platform to
through unchallenged.
en
and
n,
Web
flying
Cnl
«•
A set of triplets 24 years old are Hv<
ng in the town of In«z, Ky., where they
were born. They are finely built
and remarkably alike in appearance In
every respect. Two are married.
men

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