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Montpelier examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho) 1895-1937, July 25, 1896, Image 3

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091111/1896-07-25/ed-1/seq-3/

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Why
don't send samples of
Schilling's Best:
I. It is too pood to send
lo people who don't wane it.
a. People always think the
•ample is better than the tea.
3 . No need of samples
anyway. Every package is a
■ample —if you don't Tike it,
you pet your money back
from the procer.
Also pure and money-backed: Sr hit
tint's JScs/c ofiee, baking-powder, soda,
spices, and flavoring extracts.
A Schilling & Company San Francisco
IBB
LOVE IN THE DESERT
One day a bov
lather with a hook,
word mean?" he asked, for
that his father knew all t> e
came running to his
■'What does this
he believed
world and
most of the things beyond. The parent
believed that, too, and that is ho
Child come to imbibe the idea,
man looked and s i
V the
The
vord "love."
the
"Do y <
papa?" asked the boy.
"On, ves," said the father.
vhnl that word
leans,
And he
began thinking.. lie ihoughi for a long
time, for there were so
love that he hardly knew
many things in
here to be
gin defining. And the longer he re
mained silent the hard:r it seemed to
find a beginning. "It is difficult to
answer," he observed, and the hoy in
terrupted him.
4, Whei
we find a difficult problem at
school," he «aid, "we go to the rule.
What is the rule about love?"'
The father looked at him but did not
He thought. Then tie gazed
anxiously about, and out through the
window he saw a man passing.
answer.
"Ah," he said, "there Is Mr. Bi
and I want to
n,
him.
And he hurried out to speak to the
man, and the hoy
is or what is its rulr.
never heard
vhat
Io«

Ford, being quite satisfied that the
story was a lie front the beginning and
that his search for the wonderful lost
desert tribe would result it
benefit
institution, stopped
•ater wagon,
to the Smithsonh
to rest in the shade of the
the
heels of
inches into the roasting si
"Look^uut,"
vhich
vere sunk 18
lid.
he
elled to
drivers," "or this Nevada s
action on you and you w
corn! Lord, isn't it hot!" And he looked
about at the blistering white and blue
and cudgeled out of his memory certain
verses :
le of the
n will get
ill pop l*ke
And when grim spirits come
land.
To be where wanderers fell.
They look in terror at the burning sand
And hurry back to hell—
"And that's de»
that curs'd
■rt Nevada, and
we are driving and swearing a
Ing through it to find the desert tribes
man, who is a lie."
id sweat
"By the powei
Graves, his assistant.
it isn't
lie!" yelled
"LookI"
"A Chinese boy," roared Ford, "And,
great scott, i
red headed Chinese bov,
a camel, andin Nevada!"
and
Hong Foy w
Goggln told hi
tamp Southerr
as Yo Heave,
ed Chinaman's name
as a dismal failure. Me
daily. He could 110't
Pacific tie
half as
veil
hateverthe pockniark
as, and Fon Kee
could almost carry a "60 pound to the
yard" rail by himself,
g and pale and
bile Hong Foy,
:alm, found
the spike maul
Wherefore the invest
b< 4 ng y «
it difficult to lug evei
the pinch bar.
ment of the Southeri
Pacific Railroad
company In H
by Mike McGoggin, the
weird an
only McGoggtn used wor
same import, but of dific
g Foy was denominated
section fore
d wonderful failure
r"of the
ma
cia
TTTTTTT Foy, however, could cook,
and he showed Maggie McGoggin how
to make
it pron
rîoîlT
t of po.ato sprouts
which McGoggin declared to be the tri
umphant work of the devil. Soup, by
the way. is
merited 011 when the section board!
soup
thing not to be experi
house is at a place in Nevad.awhei
water is brought In a tank fi
tion 80 or i
the
a sta
niiles away. McGoggin
appreciated the soup, ami because of it
refrained for two weeks fn
ing Hong Foy; but on a Saturday night
of the month of June, In the year 1881,
he threw a bolt at Hong Foy, hit him
with a crooked spike and made a run to
the toolhouse to get a
him with. He had st
she kissed the v
discharg
rench to kill
:en Maggie
g Chinaman in the
hen
kitchen.
In the shade of the toolhouse, «after
McGoggin had-retired, Hong Foy crept
like a dog which had been whipped out
of its kennel, but knows not where to
go. He knew two lines of steel over
which Chinamen labored, while a red
headed white man swore voluably at
them. He knew a blue horizon, and
these things were all he knew in that
lard—excepting the sun Where could
he go? A* he leaned dejectedly against
the toolhouse and thought of his love
iking, he wept, and weeping Maggie
found Idin. Hong Foy had not dreamed
of the future, and hail not expected the
coming pf the girl. He had expected to
sleep in the toolhouse that night and
he beaten again in the morning. But
Maggie had planned. The best part of
her plan was that she had brought a
huge bottle, and it had water In it "We
will go that way," she said, pointing
out into the desert.
It is not so bad to walk al!
light
through the desert if you are sure you
will have shade in which to rest the
next day. Butthensxt day came and
Maggie and Hong Foy looked about
them all they saw was what a couple- of
ants in a plasterer's box ©f lime see.
Far, far, far away, round about and near
it was white. And it was so flat tHat
they seemed to look up out of a basin
to a brim which was white and blue
and the alkali and the sky nestled so
close to each other and the sky arched
over as though It were the root of the
plain In such wise that Maggie thought
thev
ight as well have been Impris
oned In the shell of a huge egg—onlv
would have to be the biggest egg and
biggest shell ever created, and there
It
rouhl only be room lor one such like in
e world. The sun was beautiful in the
early morning, and there were roses In
•he desert east just as there are roses In
the east of tne orcherd land.
The nun
looked on them with a friendly rotundity
for an hour,
the frown was of
d then he frowned, and
hite heat.
Sleepily
they plodded on searching for a brush
big enough to cast two feet of shade.
They had no means of telling time
other than by the sun, but the girl knew
the secrets of the sun and knew it
was 10
o'clock when the pale, calm face of
Hong Foy looked into hers with a dumb
piteousness, and he sank li
a swoon.
Idly the girl uncovered his head
ami saw for the first time the great jag
ced,
III
gged hole made by that bent
spike thrown by her father,
had dug deep hut the Chinaman had
plastered the wound with the clean
waste taken from the toolhouse and had
wrapped hia cue around It.
i a
The Iron
Maggie re
garded the hurt with a little bit of
mantv horror, and then she thought of
her lover had walked all that
night through the sands with hts head
wrecked hy her father's effort and had
not intimated that he was Injured at all.
"He Is worth It," said Maggie,
tenderly she dressed the wound, wash
ing It with the precious water Hong
Foy had carried in the great bottle. "He
Is worth It."
wo
ho
And
If you would have to
guess at the
smallest part of that awful journey go
out on the Southern Pacific to the olace
where the temperature it normally
140 In June at 1 1 «'clock In the day time,
where the alrU so hot that It curl« Itself
up, where the alkali is baked Into pow
der finer than the flne»t powder known
to medicine, and without the «lightest
breath of air to agitate It sifts and
ter« about over the face of the earth, be
ing drawn up by the sun ju«t an you have
heard of water being drawn up.
unpleasant ride to you, for you
will leave your coat at Ogden and your
raiment along the right of way with
great persistence,
at
scat
It will
be
til in the middle of
the desert vou will be a disgrace and
will belong In the same epoch as Adam
and Eve, but you will not think of Adam
and Eve, for thev lived where water
and grass and trees and blossoms, and It
would make you Inaaneto think of those
as you looked out on the writhing blue
mountains millions
was
of miles awav.
Mountains which you see here* this
ment and are gone when you look again.
And beating, beating, beating with a
might that makes your head thump is
the great world-consuming
YeR, if you would like to guess about
Maggie and Hong Foy—and thetr
days* parching, famishing, agonizing
jo u
mo
sun.
ey until they walked out of death
and Into a green line of paradise which
ran along a clear river,
there and do It for youraelf.
end of the journey, If you ever get to
the end of It, perhaps you will fall faint
ing and deathlike at the margin of the
stream as Hong Foy did, or perhaps you
will fall on your knees and
Maggie.
you must go
And at the
did
pray
*

*
"The only thing In the cabin," said
Grave«, "which plalnlv
out of the things hereabout Is
bottle,
was not made
a great
hich is apparently for water. I
onder where ft came from?"
"Ï don't," said the driver of the water
"What I want to know Is about
that there humpy lookin' camel beast
hat the boy met on
hat thing came from and I'll go home
satisfied."
vagon.
us. Tell me where
"They don't itiow themselves," said
Fotd»— k*T hey only know he
here one day, and the woman says he
was sent bv God to help the Chinese
haul wood i
came In
inter time, but the Chi
naman insists that he wa« created out of
alkali or something, from what I gather
in talking to him, as a special gift of hi*
joss. The boy says nothing. I consider
that beast the greatest object lesson tn
the conciliation ot religious disputes
that I ever struck, for white holding
different views they don't quarrel
about him. The real explanation Is
probably that he is the offspring of some
of those camels the Unitod State
he
gov
sev
eminent brought over from Africa
eral years ago for use In the Arizona
army posts, but which turned out a
failure and w ere let loose to roam where
they would."
"I suppose," said Graves, "that you
will say in your report that the red
headed, half Chinese kind is the natu
ral child of the desert?"
"Yes. If this land of heat and hard
ship it ever to be peopled, I think that
will be the breed for it!"
"Did It ever strike you," said Graves
to Ford, after they had got back to clvil
zatlon, "ho
yours and his wife and child out there
f one
that Chinese friend of
that desert are so fond
another?"
I
"Graves," said Ford, "the word 'love'
always seemed to me to be a sort of a
s'icklv one for a grown man to use in
talking to another, but do you know
that is
liât I would call that case? I
don't think I'd say fond."
"I don't understand it at all,'
observed.
Graves
"Well, you know there's no rule for
Love is
that kind of tiling, old man.
something you can't cipher out like
your latitude and your longitude."_
Chicago Record.
Mint Marks on Our Coins.
you are but slightly acquainted
numismatics, you
can easily tell where the United State«
coins were made hy the "mint marks"
which they bear. Coins minted at
Charlotte, N. C., bear the letter C, those
made at Dahlongga, Ga., the letter D,
those at New Orleans the letter O, those
Carson City C, and those at San Fran
cisco the letter S.
If
with the science of
FIFTY THOUSAND
TO FIVE.
Calls a Londoner'.
*'Silver Dick" Mackmtoah
B>I Bluff.
man In Salt Lake.
There is one
V*
the Herald, who believes
the gold bugs
• not going to triumph this fall and
who I. witling to back his judgment with
money.
Richard Mackintosh recci
arc
:d a cable
gram from Nick Treweek, who Is In
London, stating that there
w. W . ager £,0 ' 00 ° *° £'.000 that Mc
Kinley would be elected,
tosh did not stop to ponder, but
ceeded to the Western Union
and cabled back that he would take
bet, at the same time cabling hts £t,ooo
to Martin's bank, London, with instruc
tions to place It against the Britisher's
£10,000, provided he
cash.
When seen Mr. Mackintosh declined
to disclose the name of the Englishman
for publication, saying he did not be
lleve the gentleman would
was an offer
Mr. Macin
pro
office
the
came up with the
really put up
money, but that he considered the
offer more of a bluff than anything else.
Mr. Macxintosh expressed a desire to
take several more ol the
bets.
hts
same kind o
Mr. Mackintosh is
rapidly earning the
right to share the title of "Silver Dick,"
with the distinguished Missouri state's
ho was the Utah delegation's first
choice for the
man
presidency. Though a
republican, no man Is taking a lived r
Interest In the cause of silver than he,
albeit the assistance he renders
Influence he exercises is of the
ostentatious character, his affluence
abling him to render the kind of
ance most needed.
It has been learned, not from him, in
deed, but from a source considered emi
nently reliable, that he Is one of three
prominent western
and the
most un
en
assist
men to make up a
purse ol $6,000 In caBh, each contribut
ing $3,000, which was recently sent to
A. F. Bartlne, publisher of the Bi-Metal
llst, at Chicago, to assist In conducting
the campaign, which that great sliver
educator I« making In the
other of the three gentlemen mentioned
was also a Salt Lake man, and the third
was Marcus Daly of Montana.
east. An
COLORS OF RATTLESNAKES.
the end of a .harp rod or walking «tick.
Some Mexican« are experts at catching I
rattler«. They ,1 way. take them alive
They Take oa the Hue of the Rock, Where
They Have Deae.
A few days ago a Mexican was exhlo
Itlng on the streets of Pomona a rattle
snake that he had captured In
the neighboring canyons. He was lead
Ing the snake around by a cord of horse
hair fastened about Its neck and tied
one of
If they can. and they seldom fall, for It
I« a lively snake tl at can escape them
when they are armed for the fray.
If they cannot sell their captive alive
they kill It a-d sell the skin
price for a hat band or a belt.
at a good
The
snake in question was a rare specimen.
e feet long, plump
and sleek, and almost as black as coal.
Nobody had ever seen a black rattler
before. One man declared that tt
no rattlesnake because it was black.
One of the Interested spectators,
had been looking the snake
fully, but had said nothing, was lacob
Morency, an old mining prospector,
had traveled over nearly all of the min
eral regions of Southern California and
Mexico. The man who scouted the idea
of a rattlesnake being black, turned to
Morency and said:
"What do you think about it. Jake?"
"Well," said the latter, "you'd better
not let him bite yon, unless vou're ready
to pay your debts, say your prayers and
die ; for he's a
It
about th
was
ffio
over care
ho
rattler all right enough.
Rattlesnakes are not like charmeleuns
exactly—they can't change their color
in the twinkling of
are of a greater variety of /
cows are.
eye—b*
an
iey
In
lan
I have seen tk
sry
color imagineable and A.
the
same color of the soil or rocks In which
they are found, and the diamond-shaped
spots on their sides and back
times lighter and sometimes dark
than the rest.
of
are some
< r
I once saw a rattlesnake
caught in a canyon In Lower California
near San Fernando, that
black as jet and the diamond «pots were
lined with white. Two years ago I
killed a rattler in Parla Valley, In
Northern Arizona, that was th
half feet long, and ol a deep red
color, with diamonds of jet black,
think it was the handsomest snake I
I have his skin vet.
another valley not more than forty
miles from there I saw rattlesnakes as
yellow as ochre, with reddlBh diamonds
Brown rattlers with dark spots are the
most common.
to
almost
13
in
and
ever saw.
In
But the queerest look
Ing rattler I ever saw a friend of mine
and I caught I
or six years ago. We were riding along
the western coast of the peninsula,
about opposite Guadalupe, when
Lower California five
we
came upon a.rattle*
with faint black lines outlining the dia
mond spots. It was the
iku
bite as milk
ly white one
ever saw, though I ht
light colored.
e seen many
It had simply taken
the color of the white rocks and sands
where it lived. We captured it alive
and took it to San Diego and sold it for
$25 to a man named King, who
gathering rare specime
and insects for
all
La
the
was
of reptiles
some eastern institu
tions."—San Francisco Call.
The Ants Talked About.
I' is becoming the general belief
among naturalists that all living
ure* have some communicatio
eacl other, at least to the extent of mak
ing iheir wants, fears, etc., known to
others of their species,
ants ecently investigated the matter
far asthose interesting little
conce ned.
creat
with
s
A writer on
'
as
ants were
He saw a drove of ants of
«mal, black variety, which
the
is
to
that
one
it
were ap
parenty moving to new quarters, those
going na certain direction all
carrying
eggs .r sick and helpless retail
ves,
while Lose going in an opposite direc
tion a-peared to have just deposited
their birdens and to be just returning
for anotier toad ot "household effects/'
They were pretty well along with their
work, judging by the lelsurly
which they jogged along, and
meeting they would frequently put their
heads together as though chatting about
their new quarters,
teresting subject.
In ihe naturalist's mind
wav

upon
HOme other in
It being a question
hether thev
were really talking
expedient of murdering one of thel
number to see if the others
not, he hit on Ih
voultl run
He
and tell what had happened.
"The eye witness ol the
ened away and laid »heir heads togclh
with every ant th-y met,
would turn and
urder hast
:r
hereupon al
scamper away. *
* No more ants passed along
path during the day."
that
The Growing Boy.
Mark Twain
piece of good, *
for y
for himself.
ice gave Ms sis»et
nd advice: "Never
do
r boy," he said, ''what he
ran do
It Is very grevons -oine
»therwise unselfish and
times to see
sthle woman slaving and worki
wearing herself out in m
to make the wheels of life
I
-
istaken effort
smooth!
for her boy or girl.
In reality, this
child's work for him is a most subtle a
dangerous form of
the mother
readiness to d<
a
id
unselfishness, and
ho falls into this tiMupta
tion is doing a f| 8 he
difficult for her.
can to make life
Remember that it
Infinitely more difficult at first, to t
a child to perform certain acts than to
do the
is
each
herRelf, but perseverance in
this respect will
child endless trouble in the years to
come.
'e both mother and
It may be a piece of
unselfishness on the part of a mother to
make a child retrace wearv steps, to look
for things he has carelessly throw
aside, to undo bad work he has done,
and to clear awav his Utter of toys him
self.
ublime
Air in the Bones of Bird-.
It Is often salrl bv persons
well enough acquainted with the science
of ornithology to know whether thev
speak the truth or not, that the hones of
the turkey vulture are hollo
hers, so constructed as to admit of
tlnuous flight with hut slight effort
the part of the bird. Of late vont
ho are not
air cham
• on
on
It
has become the general belief that the
bone« of almost «II var'etieR of birds are
simply air cylindars, and that the lordtv
turkey vulture and the condor are not
better provided for In that particular
than a host of smaller hirds. In order
to get some scientific light on the subject
Dt Crisp dissected S2 specie« of bird«.
""V 1 "' J™ 1 ° nl > found '3
. ' e w ng ones
" / V ° ne ' th . C f P arrow hawk - »pneared
to have the bony air chamber* perfected.
In 38 others examined by the Doctor
there were
were hol!<
r , and
sign« of air in the hones
ilth.
igh
this list there were several
of long and ranld flight.
Crisp's conclusions are that there
but fei
birds
Dr.
are
birds which have been provided
with natural air chamberR, and that In
cases where the provision is made I* it
not of such material benefit
generally supposed.
has been
Firecrackers in China.
Firecrackers are also used to bring
rain when it Is needed,
exploded on
They are hot
scientific principles, but
simply to attract the attention of L
Wong, the rain god. If, after repeated
salvos the drought con tin
supposed tobe asleep, and .active
ures are taken . The chief officials of the
district, dressed in
ng
,the deity is
meas
Ing and follow,
ed by numerous sorrowing farmers,visit
his temple.
moui
In front of the procession
arc carried four silken banners decorated
with the characters representing wind,
rain, thunder and lightning,
placed in the stands near the altar and
surrounded by lighted candles,
with
These are
Then,
very
writ
much kow-towing (bowing
low) and 'chln-chlnlng (greeting),
tea prayers to the rain god are burned
In a sacred fire.
A tremendous
lute
of firecrackers follows, accompanied bv
the usual clashing of cymbals, beating
of gongs, etc. These salvos
tinued dav after day until Lung Wong
wakes. Sooner
are con
later, they never fail
to rouse him.—New York Evening Post
of
Qi
Human Frmily Statistic*,
iman family more males than
females are born into the world.
Europe the proportion of 106 to 100.
The latest anthropological statistics
shows that the world's birth rate exceeds
its death rate in a ratio of 3 to 1.
High-grade microscopes sho»
the human body is covered with minute
scales, each scale covering 300 pores.
Only six persons out of each i,<
live to be 75 years old, and only
reaches the century mark.
Huxley's tables of the weights of
show that the human frame is made of
13 different chemical elements.
The statistics of 18^5 show that, tak
ing the world over, there are 109 adult
females to each 100 adult males.
The estimated population of the
in 1895,savages included, was 1,500,000,
to
In the h
In
I
that
om
man
th
I
Id
>f

000 persons.
Botnbaugh says that
to
ily one-half of
all the human beings born in the world
live to reach the age of 17 years.
The French medical journal, called
La Practician, says that an average of
4,847,500,000 persons die in the world
during each century.
The average weight of the brain of
the adult male of the human species the
world over, is over 3^ pounds; of the
female 2 pounds n ounces.
that
at
a
Wonderful Maure«
Sunlight.
From a comparison of the relati
entity of selar, lunar and artificial light,
s i et rmlned by Professors Euler and
e in
lie
Wollaston, It appears that the rays of
the sun have an illuminating power that
wonderfnl in # the extreme. According
their deductions the illuminating
power of the "great day star" is equal to
that of 14, ix» candles, at a distance of
one foot, or of 3 »* 1 fx J» (J «j.oo«,ooo t cxx>,ooo,
000,000,000 candles at a distance of 95,
o<o,«xx) miles,
folio
to
I
a
the above fig*
that the amount of light which
y
fMENd
NC"

or^ir
DOLLAR NEED
PAID UNTIL YC
r> r
A
[CURED
R
E
Or. O. W. Shorn, "The P*orl*'* D«.«
way* Making to help suffering mankind, a
•ng »0 co 1 vine* pot.pl« that hr «iv*> valu,
for mry dollar paid him. has dreided to pu
try. fraud and Imposition its death blow, and «V
tha sumrlng classes from thr despicable nn hod-.
«sacks aod ckartatans Every sufferer f:
MAN
HOOD
ai
k
LOST
Se*tMl Waakaass. Varicocele. Hydrocele. Svfh.'lli*
old aer
•rgsns. premature
privais diseases, wi.siher , «
tag Ion.
and an
îî2KïtJ5«i ta m writ, to "I m o t ô
DOCTOR." A. m rto ku given hi- lit,, , C u. nr
a J?***». «— »»eeilned. «dvlsed. TWRA 1 Hi A No
CUBED WITHOUT PAYINO «In ONI- |)OI | Ak
UNTIL THB CURB U EPPBCTED, th.
ssly • wall ta. Tha doctor m.rvri ihr
however. ta ata. an, lacunbl* ce- n hr
car» yan ha Aaa't waat year aonrv Such
»u never ul, beton hr aay
Dr. O. W. Sham la aaty «Or to make
r*>
ht.
-fter
responsible phyvicl
i-t
to Is
of
a m* caa afford
wait t
In
wwck is doas. Don't waste
NcïéTîKcH D E £7
IA i
Itta ML 0.1. SHORES
MLImmM teatkK. UtUkfCUi.OUL
flo'
from the solar orb could not be
produced by the daily burning of
globes of tallow, each equal to the earth
in magnitude!
200
The People of Mudeira.
They are as hnrmlei
as their conn
try. The stranger meets with no snakes,
and need not fear mosquitoes, neither
has lie to take any precaution against
being molested in the most out of the
vay parts. Everywhere civility, polite
ness and pleasant faces will greet him.
The price« asked are grotesq
hat will finally be
»ften
five times
:epted
Some find ihe absence of fixed prices
abroad a great nuisance, hut the
gaining in Maderia Is so good hum
and can he made so amusing that the
change of custom in this respect is
rather refreshing.
There is one reason that may account
or the comparatively few visitors to
the island—there are neither golf links
nor cycling roadt. All Madel
Is to provide a very limited cricket
ground and five miles of fairly level
bar
ed
can do
road.
Most of the ways near the city
are paved with "nubbly" stones and are
trying to the feet, but in the country
this paving ceases.—Good Words.
Queer Things About Flames.
There is a relation between the color
of flame and the energy of the com
bustion causing it. The more vig
our and complete the combustion the
higher the refranglbility of the light.
A flame burning in
trlcted way emits rays that are red
When burning in a more complete and
effective
tardv ami
nanner the emitted rays
change to violet.
The flame of a candle or a
amp con
RiRtß of a series of eccentric, luminous
shells, surrounding
These shells of the (lame emit light of
differeut colors, the innermost
central core.
(that
direct contact with the dark core)
being red, and having a temperrture of
977 degrees Fahrenheit. Upon this,
and in their proper order of
bility, are shells of light w
orange, yellow, green, blue, Indigo and
violet. The reason that such a flame
ii
■frangi
hich are
does not appear to us
of different colored lights Is this: Whei
we look upon such a flame
s a nest of cones
ill of the
rays issuing from the different layers or
strata of concentric lui
iinous shells
received by tne retina of the eye at <
and the same time. This can
press with the sensation of r
white metal.
1 1 v im
leutrnl
Male and F<
tale Oak*.
Mr. Knight, the eminent Englis
bot
anist has made some curious and inter
esting investigations
of floxvers of different sex
tree, He shows that as a rule that
the production
f the oak
spe
cies of tree bears the male and female
flowers on separate individuals, but that
these different individuals may be
to produce flowers of either sex at
lade
hi.
I
forcing the female oak to produce
male flower,s and vice vei
1, Mr. Knight
employed light heat, regulating the sup
ply of both to suit himself and accord
ng to the end in view. This remark
able scries of experiments proved that
the heat was excessive rs c
i pared
with the Itght, male flowers
peared. On the other hand If the light
was excessive and the temperature com
parativelv low, nothing but female flow -
ly ap
s were produced.
In other species of trees
e male and female flo
hich bear
th
ers on separate
Individuals the experiment of the bola
ere not so conclusive as in the case
However, it is believed
hat these investigations will finally lead
ajority of
ill be
Many
being
st
I
>f the
iaks.

to the conclusion that in the
trees and plants the
able to produce
curious investigations
made along those lines and wi
ped surprising results.
It! valor
;xes at will.
e no<
may
reatest on k.arth.
The highest steeple in Ihe world i
that of the cathedral at Ant
feet.
The deepest coal mine in France, that
at Andre du Poirier, is 3,983 feet in
dedth.
The highest priced medicine is meta'
galliuni, which is worth $ioo,oo<
pound.
T^ie longest paved str
a street, Boston— ij *4
The deepest coal
bert—3,490 feet.
argest hammer is in the Krupp
^StYorks. Essen, Germany,
made ¥»'fv;b66 and weighs 150 tons.
The target jug was made last year by
a firm of potteA*t Atherstone, England.
erp—417
t
lie
per
eet is W as hi rig
miles.
to
line In Belgium is
I
a
The Wonder of the 19th Century
Utah Lithia^fe
Mineral Water.
Coutau
• the
rid.
p in cases of fifty quari
Positively cures
K he
bottles »-ach.
all 1
r
l hi
Diva t
•*i
iM 1
The Salt Lake City Soda Water Ct
Ml
Air IATW,
NAi/r
LAKK
« TTY,
UTAH
CUT PRICES ON PUMPS.
. ! very tiling the turmcr sells I, low. Wb«
ÿJPL k -'ll.s low to him j* We have repeatedly refuted
10 ,a ' ■'uid, then fore, defeated windmill combi- ^
since *89, reduced the cost of
one-sixth what It was.
O«'
o'
.
«fions, and bu
9 Wchelï
prices, high grades
No one knows the
<1 t
__ sales.
•MS best pump or
•flkours. Wi; lit;
«
prices until he knows
axe short hand and long
Dowur stroke pumps, with best
less brass tube cylinder, lower than
Iron ones— a 2Î4 x i6 inch at fa.ia. Tell
your dealer. Buy none other. Aermotor prices and j
tUMKis are alway s best. Through gratitude, and Æ
u t' pri< o makers, and are safest to
u M ilio world h.is given us more than half w
its windnnli business. We have ao
near you. Write for brautifully ill,,
Cm| CAGo
\
«lo.il
branch houses—
ft rated -■*
Utah Nursery Company
KST.M ISSUED 1885.
A large stuck
roses, shrubs
at low prices.
'f fruit and
'rn-.menial trees, also small fruits,
A' iki ,1 specialty of supplying commercial planta
( all and examine stock.
, c. ;
—Ol- KICK :
Naylor Block
—SALT' LAKE CITY, UTAH.
J. VI flIRRIF
SAY I' i,
is
to
MINERS' ASSAY OFFICE,
ed
LOUIS SKCKKLS. Man At
»4 Neronil MoiKh, Kali i
I*, o. iiov i a I tv.
Assay for Gold mid Silv«
tc, I'ft tent* iMldifi«
xuresH will if <4
ttnnt Ion
Ï.H.
the City.
. bead. Cop per
s
1
pit
• W N II 30 1 Y *6.
It holds 210 (
A belt. In <»
at Min
said to Ih* c
cowhides.
The tallest
at the Royal Smelting Works,
It Is 22 feet in din
at the top and 460 feet high.
juart-.
•e of the big II«
loapolis. is 2fio fort If.
'ring mills
iposed of .'(17 rti
chi i
v in thr
Saxoi
Her at the ha
A Mystei
<»t the Mails,
mil d livered a h\s y
her da
In the
est l>hi|.
nrlclpbln r
May, the
covered t
v Will la tu
veil k
• wn ship cha
dele
dis
most
It
invitation to his o<
ias a
vhich occurred ii
««ldi!
«
Shy, ami
bei
dssive has beei
29 years Ih a
It
to a friend of foi
h
I bei
resided at 333 W 1
1 art on si reel. C«
isider
ng its age, the cm
good state of pro
conpletely covered
added by postrl officials
tion card, while yellow w
litte evidei
elope is in
vallon, although
ill. age. gl
ce of ii
«r*of strange
existei
hv - Philadelphia Led
Cob
id Snort- •• Hut«- U
Mr. President, for
be thankful.
'v hich
ight to
Ex-Covernor Joseph II Willi.u
Maine died frm
IS of i
Ruined!
You can spoil even Schil
ling's Best (money-back)
by boiling it.
Just as the water begins to
boil, take it off the stove and
put in the tea ; let it stand six
or eight minutes
then pour it.
No matter what tea
use, this is the
A Schilling & Company c.
tea
-no longer;
you
way to make it.
Francisco
*s
The weight of the Great K
the
largest ship ever built, was 12,1
Her machiner \
rw. tij
in bv hi
r of 1
ir un 8 l„«s.
each ha
•»'« Oil- p
IIOU'M Till
We offer One Hum«!:
of Catarrh tl
Hull's Catarrh Cure.
K. «I. CHFNKY A CO. Props . Toledo. O
We, :he undersigned hi
yy for the last 15 yen« s,
perfectly honorable in till !
Ket
fut
red h
k .1
Che
■! believ<
. and financially able t<
ohlijrntioi
.
Wkht A Tin ax Wholesale I
ujfirittt«, Toledo
o
Waldisg. Ki
nay A Mahvin Wholesale
Druprgriat*. Toledo «)
Hall's Catarrh Cure is f.»U
Ina di
faces of the xysten
Hold hy all Driiggiat*. Te
Hull's family I'ills ur
•tly upon the hi.
• I n
>1
1.
rle.
I*
►he bei
It is
v estimated thaï
net at
large as the earth, and
miles long
thirty ton*
h le
«haï
r
îeSmith —Thi
limits of New York u i
advantage.
Hostetler McGii
t hat ?"
Gjis DeSniith
garden truck."
•.•riding *7
(
' ! OK
r.lLc
Un
Couct
1
-
Ho! for 1896.
'low ha y,
ir Hi
'! Youlwill want
A Bicycle
lilts .vet
-- ...s,ney,
you the name,
positively
nr "yebahle and O. K. in every re
- Paul We desire to call your attention to the
nit what
ID AMBLER !
^tlii' Great ttmrë Vl r i n ne p olPj
*«r». the Heal Top-note her.
. .... - heel built on hone
. *'r/%TtI IzItHTOJV' K line of medlii
1-if whrnlH, the finnst line ever produtf
the prior.
Kmd for Our (latnlORue
«1 « xtsitler our goods und prices before
11 huy. \\ e ars hi 11 position to do you
I »on t forjrrt that wo have the largest
Spot'tinjj Goods, Guns, Rifles
f ihr state, and pri.-es are right..
.ipowniiijg Bros.
1 Mali. Street, Salt Lake City, Utah.
>' » Wurihiuirtoii Avenue. Oifdeii, Utah*
rn t
Till III 'IK.
f,
'
U ol
Kir..
00*'T LIMP
When you
can I»«
made to
u ulk straight. W« take plas
ter of paris cast of feet to In
hu re comfort.
•'>peciniists in
crippled and de
Steol braces and
Iflclul limbs of every descrlp
" Hilgart Deform
ity Shoe Co.
V
foi
*
I
i /
llllvit Houth Street,
* AK CITY
*
A LI
1
DR- 0- B- HEWETT
THE DEÎ
SALT LAI
1 OOLYHLOCK.
?
,\v.' ■ IV» gj in Finest
S. . \|l j a] //, ;J ator In th
WJ Mill ' ,v, -' h w
I if Filling and Extracting
positively without pain
r danger.
Very moderate prices.
tes.
mk
im
K r'M
I
rm
jyTQNCbcM
. Æ.'COLinm
TALK &
•m
, A-C)
When
Irîuy i nj^r
SHOES!
should buy the best the
market affords.
Robinson Bros
■»
I he Shoe Builder«, . . ,
Manufacture Them,
ask your dealer for them
or send direct to us.
:U \%
I ii-t Hun ih.
«all Luke
Reliable
PEDIGREED FRUIT TREES.
PIONEER NURSERIES CO..
SALT UKKC11Y, UTAH.
^ow Only First Class- Hiah
Grade STOCK.
LOSING OUT REGARDLESS
OK COST !
flak Brass F
.1 Center Tables $j.nq
' proportion. We wilt
New Furniture. We
will buy all
knd house
Even thing
bandit
ure.
y pay melds,
com! hand furn
hold good for sale JjâfÊ
ou
XL .
■prStOie,
Pond South
NSEN
Tc! 3

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