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Montpelier examiner. [volume] (Montpelier, Idaho) 1895-1937, April 06, 1906, Image 3

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091111/1906-04-06/ed-1/seq-3/

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I
There is only One
Genuine- Syrup of Figs»
The Genuine is Manufactured by the
California Fig Syrup Co.
lil
« :
The full name of the company. California Fig Syrup Co.
fa printed on the front of every package of the genuine.
fir-;
#*•
The Genuine- Syrup of Figs- is for Sale, in Original
Packages Only, by Reliable Druggists Everywhere
Knowing the above will enable one to avoid the fraudulent imita
tions made by piratical concerns and sometimes offered by unreliable
dealers. The imitations are known to act injuriously and should
therefore be declined.
Buy the genuine always if you wish to get its beneficial effects.
It cleanses the system gently yet effectually, dispels colds and headaches
when bilious or • constipated, prevents fevers and acts best on the
kidneys, Ihrer, stomach and bowels, when a laxative remedy is needed
by men, women or children. Many millions know of its beneficial
effects from actual use and of their own personal knowledge. It is the
laxative remedy of the well-informed.
Always buy the Genuine- Syrup of Figs
MANUFACTURED BY THE
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5 v.
r
Cal.
5&i\
flew York.
Louisville, Ky
IBZ iwnr CENTS HR Borax
m
W» L. Douglas
*3= & $ 3= SHOES üi»
W. L. Douglas $4.00 Gilt Edge Line
cannot be equalled at any price.
SHOES M
«-L t
! nil CIS f
/ y
v<s}
U
r
I
IT
IN
THE
WORLD
fSTA&USMÎD
JULY e |8f*
Capital * 2.504000
'■Be
W.L. DOUGLAS MAKES « SELLS MORE
MEM'S,$3.BO SHOES THAK AMY OTHER
MAMUFACTURER IN THE WORLD.
PI n nnn REWARD to «iqon. who con
V I UjUUU disprove this statement.
Il I could take you Into my three large factories
*t Brockton, Maso., and show you the Infinite
every patrol shoes la made, you
would realize why W. L. Douglas S3.50 shoes
poet more to make, why they hold their shape,
fit better, wear longer, and are of greater
Intrinsic value than any other $3.30 shoe.
Hi L. Douglas Strong Modo Shooo for
Mon. S2.BO, SO. air. Bay•' School A
Orom * Shooo. SO. SO, SS. SI. IB. SI.BO
CAUTION.—Insist upon having WX.Doug
Jaa shoes. Tnke no substitute. None genuine
Without bis name and price stamped on bottom.
fast Color Eyelets used ; they will not wear brassy .
Write for Illustrated Catalog.
W. L. DOUGLAS. Brockton, Maas.
care with which
When Answering Advertisements
Kindly Mention This Paper.
W. N.U., Salt Lake—No. 13, 1906.
$123.10
œgL
n
«
MONEY FOUND
)
We collected $12310 for Mr S. H,
Tracy of Ogden He indorsed for
a friend. We got the money back
for him. We can collect some for
you, if you turn them in
Merchants'Protective Association
Scientific Collectors of Bad Debts, Commercial Block,
Salt Lake City. Francis G. Luke, General Manager.
Some people don't like us.
»>
<<
ANTI-GRIPINE
25 Ct».
PRICE. ^3
yiotminimp
p^- IN Oft DAY
IS GUARANTEED TO CORK
flRIP, BAD COLD, HEADACHE AHD NEURALGIA.
I wont nil AntS-torlWlw« to a ««.1er who wont finnatN
It. till lor your MOW»» HACK IV IT DON'T CBM.
W. W. Dienter, M. D., Manufacturer, Springfield, Mo.
AMPINE
/ *
HALL'S CANKER ASP DIPHTHERIA BEHEBT
»y&V.WSiïïïS": -RIVER FAIIS
»•MM-Jadsaa Dmi Cu., Rental Agsat*.
son »AL« »V ALL DWU»M»T»
AMD asNsnAL sTonaa.......
Sslt Lake City, Utah.
All Railroads
Entering Salt Lake City have made
ue Official Time Inspector of all
Watches used by employes.
We are Watch Specialists.
Established
Q>.
9
IA62
no
MAIN SI
Salt Lik* Citv. Utah.
A
j SIOOO" Bond A
on every cctae of
Hardesty's Extracts
l *QU&.r&.nteeinQ A
V their
Reservation
Opening
14100,000 acres of rich mountain and farm lands, in
heart of Big Game Country, to be opened Boon. Two
largo maps of Wyoming and Reserve, with 20-p.
Booklet, rostpald SOc. E.W. GLAFCKE* C. !•$
•ox 255 Cheyenne, Wyoming;.
A86AYER AND
CHEMIST.
Specimen prices: Gold, Silver. Lead,SI; Gold, Sli
der. 75c; Gold, 50c; Zinc or Copper. SI. Cyanide teste.
Mailing envelopes and rull price list aent on appllce*
tlon. Control and Umpire work solicited. Lead*
Ville, Colo. Reference.Carbonate National Bauk.
HOWARD E. BURTON,
Earliest Election.
The earliest election of which the
numbers polled have been preserved
is that at Lincoln, England, in 1547.
At this eighty-four "voices" were cast.
If you go to Conference be sure and
use the Salt Lake Route.
Acts Çelie His Words.
The rich man may say sometimes
that he was really happier when he
was poor, but still he keeps on all the
time trying to get richer.—Somerville
Journal.
Everybody get ready for Spring
Conference.
Average Human Eyesight.
A person six feet in height standing
on level ground can, with average eye
sight, see objects on the same level
for a distance of three and a quarter
miles.
HIVE TOO COWS?
If you have cream to separate a good
Cream Separator is the most profitable
investment you can possibly make. De
lay means daily waste of
time, labor and product.
DE LAVAL CREAM
SEPARATORS save
$10.- per cow per year
every year of use over al i
gravity setting systems
and $5.- per cow over
all imitating separators.
They received the Grand
Prize or Highest Award
at St. Louis.
Buying trashy cash-in-advance sepa
rators is penny wise, dollar foolish.
Such machines quickly lose their cost
instead of saving it.
If you haven't the ready cast
DE LAVAL machines may be bought
on such liberal terms that they actually
pay for themselves.
Send to-day for new catalogue and
name of nearest local agent.
\\
The De Laval Separator Co.
74 Cortlandt Street
HEW YORK
Randolph A Canal Sta.
CHICAGO
1
Spalding's Encyclopedia of Base Bali.
No. 8 S 8 . How to Bat
No. 224 . How to li»y the Outttcla
5 . llow t o l'iay Kirnt 11 »«*
No. 828 . How to l'i.iy Keoonci liana
Tlilrfl Bas«
No
. 227. How U>
. 28K. How to Play shortstop
. 22». How to ('.itch
. 230. How to Pitch
. 231. How to ro»?h; How to
aptaln »Team: How toMonapre
i l oam; How u* Umpire-, How to
nraran'.ze a f.e&ic"«
No. 232. llow to Kim the Bases
Price by Mall , 10 Cents Each.
u
Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide for 1906.
The authority consulted on all disputed point«, contain«
the now 1006 rule« and picture* of all tho leading
players, and phototcrapn« or .hundreds of teams.
Prie» 10 Cents, by MuH.
Send your name and address for Simldlnjc's Catalogua
of all Athletic Hporta~it * free.
A. G. SPALDING St BROS.
128 Nassau St., New York — 147 Wabash Are. Chicago.
THE SIGN OFIMSit
\
V
h» stood for the BEST
during seventy years of
increasing soles.
Remember this when you v»nt water
proof oiled coots, suits, hots, or horse
goods for oil kinds of wet work.
'MEaiARAime etarr c aiment.
». J. TOWER COtOSTOH, MASS. U. 5 .A.
TO WIR CANARIAN CO.laMrf TOtONTO CAE
\
When Answering Advertisements
Kindly Mention This Paper.
SIGNIFICANCE OF MONEY SIGNS.
English Terms Derived from Latin
Words—Dollar Mark.
They were discussing the other af
ternoon the question of currency sym
bols. The discussion had started by
some one making a casual remark
about "L. S. D.," referring, of course,
to "pounds, shillings and pence," says
the Washington Star. The question
arose why some of the coins were de
noted by letters that had nothing at
all to do with their selling, and there
was not one in the crowd, though
there were some nominally well-in
formed people present, who could tell
the significance of the letters till the
question was looked up. It appeared
that the pound sterling mark was
simply a capital L. with a line drawn
across the stem, it came from the
I^atin word "librae," meaning a pound.
The "d" used for the penny came also
from the Latin, meaning "denarius, '
originally a small Roman sliver coin,
but later having developed into a
generic term for money and specifi
cally for a small copper coin of in
significant value.
The "lb" mark, also used for the
avoirdupois pound, came from the
same word "librae " as In Saxon
times the pound avoirdupois was the
same weight as a pound sterling of
silver and the shilling was one-twen
tleth of this, making the old shilling
about three times the size of the
present one.
When It came to the dollar mark,
there was more discussion, there
being half a dozen explanations for
this sign. But the most likely seemed
to be that it was simply a modified
figure "8," there having been eight
silver reals in the old Spanish dollar,
or "piece of eight," in use in this
country long before the introduction
of American currency.
ted
Its
a
Made a Speedy Recovery.
On one of the visits of the Amer
ican fleet to English waters, Admiral
Erben, now retired, was in command,
with Capt. Alfred T. Mahan, the
writer on naval affairs, as his flag
captain.
One morning Capt. Mahan came to
his admiral with an invitation to dine
with a duke.
"I can't accept this," said Capt.
Mahan, "as they forgot to invite you."
"I should say you couldn't," growled
the admiral. "I'll answer for you."
Whereupon the admiral wrote:
"Admiral Erben, U. S. navy, regrets
that Capt. Mahan, his flag captain,
cannot accept the invitation of the
Duke of Blank. Capt. Mahan is on
the sick list."
An hour or so later a messenger
from the duke returned with Invita
tions for the admiral and the captain. I
Whereupon the admiral wrote again:
"Admiral Erben accepts with pleas
ure the invitation for Capt. Mahan and
himself. He wishes also to advise
the Duke of Blank that he has taken
Capt. Mahan off the sick list."—New
York Tribune.
Educating Children.
Forcing the youthful mind is a
practice no longer obtaining in schools
of the best standing but not yet ob
solete in many of the common
schools. In schools which represent
the dominant Ideas of education to
day, stimulation, interest, suggestion
prevail, and driving is avoided,
there has been some leaning toward
the prosaic, there is now a fresh in
terest in stimulating the emotions,
and a full realization of the need of
many things conventionally not class
ed among the useful, says Collier's
Weekly. The greatest problem of ed
ucation unsolved to-day relates to
girls. Heretofore their education has
been a mere copy of that long ago
established for boys,
genius will come along and conceive
thoughts that shall form the basis of
an education which shall help girls to
ail their best possibilities, without
dissipating their strength on lines of
effort established for natures In some
respects entirely different.
If
of
al i
cost
and
Some day a
The Malden Love.
The meadows hide their summer green
Under a tell of gray;
A mist rolls o'er the sunny sheen;
It is a drear, dull day!
The dewd.ops tip the blades with beads.
That shine like costly gems;
The roses hang their blushing heads
'Neath glittering diadems.
Street
But, hark! a sound of silver hells,
Echoing o'er the woody dells.
A little laugh, a »wee! clear voice
1 Which makes my beating heart rejoice!
above.
comes, a fairy fr
A little maid, whose name Is Love!
The morning mist now rolls away.
The. sky Is bathed in light,
A golden sunshine crowns the day.
My loved one Is in sight!
The birds sing out their songs again.
The flowers all l looro anew.
And music swells In joyous stiain
From out the heavenly blue.
She comes, and everything Is bright.
She comes amid the golden light,
All nature once again is gay.
It Is the brightest summer day!
She comes—a fairy from above,
A little maiden whose name Is Love!
—Outdoors.
to
to
Each.
«
1906.
Case of Survival of the Fittest
In Ireland from time immemorial,
candidates for political honors have
had to cope not only with Irish brains
but with the noble Irish oak in the
shape of a shillalah.
When George IV. visited Ireland an
election for Galway was pending.
The king inquired of a Galway gen
tleman, who came up to Dublic to at
tend his levee, which candidate would
probably be returned.
"The survivor, sir." replied the gen
tleman.—Blackwood's Magazine.
Knew What It Meant.
Bleeker—I say, old man. why don't
consult a phrenologist and find
you
out what that peculiar looking bump
on the back of your head indicates?
Meeker—Oh. I know what It indi
cates, all right.
Bleejyer—You do. eh?
Meeker—You bet I do. Tt Indicates
thaï T.y wife hss a well-developed
muscle."
BLACK AND RED HAIR ARE AKIN.
or
hollo
ton
thin
the
for
of
is
Idea to the Contrary, Long Held, Is
Wrong.
The color of the hair, says the
Grand Magazine, Is usually transmit
ted from parents to child,
especially true when both parents
have the same complexion. Instances,
however, are not uncommon where
children have hair black as ebony,
while the hair of both parents is a
burning red. Instead of disproving
the theory that a child takes after
Its parents so far as the color of the
hair is concerned, this fact, it has now
been ascertained, is all in favor of
the doctrine. Red hair, in fact. Is by
Its structure and composition much
nearer to black hair than to blond.
Very often, if the hair of a very
dark complexloned person be exam
ined attentively, a few quite red hairs
will be detected In the mass. On the
other hand, It would be time wasted
to seek for black hair In the locks of
a fair person. Similarly "it Is not in
frequent to notice children whose
hair, red at birth, becomes as they
grow older quite dark. When, too.
after some serious illness, the produc
tion of the coloring pigment of the
hair falls oft, black hair becomes not
blond, but red. Fair hair, which to a
casual eye appears to have much
more affinity to red hair than to
black, is, on the contrary, quite dis
tinct.
This is
Constituent Was Displeased.
A pertinent question was put In an
Indignant letter from an anonymous
constituent to a candidate at the gen
eral election. "Dear Sir," he wrote,
among other things, "I hope the devil
will get you. If he does not, what's
the use of having a devil?"—London
Mall.
DON'T FORGET
A lnrpe 2-oz. package Red Cross Bsll Blue, only
i cents. The Russ Company, South Bend, lnd.
Fine Deed of School Children.
A little girl attending one of tho
public schools in Paris had to stay at
home and nurse the baby whenever
her mother went out to work. The
school children took up a collection
and pledged themselves to pay the
mother as much as she could earn, In
order to enable her to stay at home
and send the child to school.
If you go to Conference be sure and
use the Salt Lake Route.
"None Is" or "None Are."7
All the friends of liberty of speech
owe gratitude to Prof. I.ounsbury of
Yale for his defense in Harper's
Magazine of the use of "none" as the
subject of a plural verb. What idiot
precisionist it was that started the
movement to schoolmaster that use
of "none" out of existence we do not
know, but his effort has had a deplor
able degree of success. An awful ex
ample ought to be made of some of
the grammarians who try tq make
language conform to rules instead of
making rules conform to language. It
will take years to u—wist the tongues
of worthy people who have compelled
themselves to say "none Is" when
their consential impulse was to say
"none are."—Harper's Weekly.
j
MIDDLE LIFE
A Time When Women Are Susceptible to Many
Dread Diseases—Intelligent Women Prepare
for it. Two Relate their Experiences.
The "change of life"is
the most critical period
of a woman's existence,
and the anxiety felt by
women as it draws near
is not without reason.
Every woman who
neglects the care of her
health at this time in
vites disease and pain.
When her system is in
a deranged condition,
or she is predisposed to
apoplexy, or congestion
of any organ, the ten
dency is at this period
likely to become active
—and with n host of ner
irritalions make
&
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29m
£
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vous
life a burden. At this
time, also, cancers and
tumors are more liable
to form and begin their
destructive work.
Such warning symp
toms as sense of suffo
cation, hotflashes, head
aches, backaches, dread
of impending evil, timid
ity, sounds in the ears,
palpitation of the heart,
sparks before the eyes,
irregularities, constipa
tion, variable appetite,
weakness, ' inquietude,
and dizziness, are
promptly heeded by in
telligent women who are
approaching the period
in life when woman's great change
may be expected.
Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Com
pound was prepared to meet the needs,
i of woman's system at this trying
I period of her life. It invigorates and
strengthens the female organism and
! builds up the weakened nervous system.
For special advice regarding this im
portant period women are invited to
write to Mrs. Pinkham at Lynn, Mass.,
and it will be furnished absolutely free
of charge. The present Mrs. Pinkham
is the daughter-in-law of Lydia E. Pink
ham, her assistant before her decease,
and for twenty-five years since her
advice has been freely given to aick
women.
Read what Lydia E. Pinkham's Com
pound did for Mrs. Hyland and Mrs.
Hinkle:
n
TO
lQt
V
V.
I
M
î :
t.
'A
.o
.4

W
EksvovfionokïïoouBmlïüraiitiaoàaaoaüDVMj
I jMrs. AEGMyland |
^aaaaaBaaoaaoaasoflMoaMBaiOBOOt^
I wrote you for advice and commenced
treatment with Lydia E. Pinkbam's Vege
table Compound as you directed, and I am
happy to say that all those distressing symp
toiusleft me and I have passed safely through
the change of life, a well woman. I am
recommending your medicine to all my
friends."—Mrs. Annie E. G. Hyland, Cheeter
town, Md.

Another Woman's Case.
During chan
of life words cannot ex
Myphysi clan said I
a cancerous condition of the female
organs. One day I read some of the testi
monials of women who had been cured by
Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound,
and I decided to try it and to write you for
advice. Your medicine made me a well
woman, and all my bad symptoms soon
44 Fadvise every woman at this period of life
to take your medicine and write yon for ad
vice."—Mrs. Lizzie Hinkle, Salem, lnd
What Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable
Compound did for Mrs. Hyland and
Mrs, Hinkle it will do for other women
presi
had
Dear Mrs. Pinkham:—
"I had been suffering with displacement of t ^ tlme of iif e .
the organs for years im was passing through , conquered pain, restored
the change of life. My abdomen was batfly , -, -- a iiiuin n««u. *iief
»wollen; ray stomach was sore; I had dizzy health, and prolonged meinC»»watb*t
spells, sick headaches, and was.very nervous, utterly baffled pbJ sician*.
Lydia E Plathaai's Vegetable Compound Succeeds Khtre Other» Fas.
Trust to Nature.
or toT much eating, by consuming alce;
hollo beverages, or W too close confine
ment to home, office or faotery,
sequence the stomach must he treatea
ton natural way before they can rectify
their earlier mistakes. The muscles to
many such people, In fact in eTer ? '
thin and thin-blooded person, do their
work with great difficulty. As •
fatigue comes early, to e***®"}* £•"«?
long. The demand for nutritive aid Is
ahead of the supply. To iusure perfect
health every tissue, bone, nerve and
muscle should take from the blood cer
tain materials and return to it certain
others. It to necessary to prepare the
stomach for the work o£ taking up from
the food what is necessary to make good,
rich, red blood. We must go to Nature
for the remedy. There were certain
roots known to the Indians of this
oountry before the advent of the whites
which later came to the knowledge of
the settlers and which are now growing
rapidly in professional favor for the cure
of obstinate stomach and liver troubles.
These are found to be safe and ye* cer
tain in their cleansing and invigorating
effect upon the stomach, liver and blood.
These are: Golden Seal root. Queen s
root. Stone root, Blood root,_Maudrake
root. Then there is Black Cherrybark.
The medicinal principles residing in these
native roots when extracted with glyo
erine as a solvent make the most reliable
and efficient stomach tonlo and Uver \v
vigors tor, when combined in Just MU
right proportions, as in Dr. Pierce s
Golden Medical Discovery. Where there
is bankrupt vitality — such as nervous
exhaustion, bad nutrition — ana thin
blood, the body acquires vigor and the
nerves, blood and all tho tissues feel the
favorable effect of this sovereign remedy-.
Although some physicians nave been
aware of the high medicinal value of the
above mentioned plants, yet few have
used pure glycerine as a solvent and .
usually the doctors' prescriptions called
for the Ingredients In varying amounts,
with alcohol. » ,, , _
The "Golden Medical Discovery" to a
scientific preparation compounded or the
glyceric extracts of the above mentioned
vegetable ingredients and contains no
alcohol or harmful habit-forming drugs.
Money in the World.
The total stock of money, in gold,
silver and uncovered paper In the
whole world amounts, in round fig
ures, to $12,000,000,000. in the United
States the total stock of money
amounts to about Î2.000.000.000.
If you go to Conference be sure and
use the Salt. Lake Route.
First Power Shoe Peg Mill.
The first power shoe peg mill In
this country was the old Cummings
peg
formerly owned by Major Ephraim
Cummings, who was the first to man
ufacture shoe pegs by power,
capacity of this mill was four bush
els a day.
Use the Salt Lake Route to Confer
ence this year. Best
Juab, Utah counties,
south.
mill at South Acworth, N. H..
The
It
from Sanpete
and the fat
A Brutalizing influence.
The telephone is having a brutaliz
ing influence. The sensitive-minded
man, who would shrink from saying
a disagreeable thing in ordinary con
versation, when talking through tha
telephone will speak his mind as
bluntly and argue as roughly, as does
ordinary business man, and, find
ing the path of brutality less painful
than he Imagined, becomes as trucu
lent when not talking on the tele
j phone.—The Graphic.

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