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Montpelier examiner. [volume] (Montpelier, Idaho) 1895-1937, July 05, 1907, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091111/1907-07-05/ed-1/seq-5/

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Look What's Here ! 1
If you want a pin, fob
elae from
thing good —
or anything
a jewelry store— «Orne
This is the Place.
Si
ESTA aits It IB jr
I 1862 f g
170
SALT LAKE CITY,^FTAtL
Bell Phone < U(!o
lml. Phone I'Ml*
P. «». Ho»
K.atahllshetl
PATENTS
Prolacl your id«as they may bring you wealth.
Paiant*, Caveats, Trade Marks and Oasions
quickly obtained. Information furnished Fro«
upon application.
Harry J. Robinson
ATTORNEY AT LAW AND SOLICITOR Of PATENTS
T02 MERCANTILE BLOCK, SALT LAKE CITr, UTAH
HORRORS OF DARK AGES.
Viaions Conjured Up in Torture Room
of Ancient Tyrant.
The horror of horrors in all Italy is
found at Padua, known as the torture
rooms of that demonical monster of
cruelty, Ecelino, a thlrtenth century
ruler of Verona, Padua, Vicenza and
Brescia. His cruelties finally became
so Intolerable that the church
claimed a crusade against him. The
peasantry rose and a farmer killed the
brute with a scythe. I was shown an
upright box in which was the skeleton
of a victim. Two apertures enabled
the condemned to see a table, just
out of reach, crowded with food and
drink. To-day, It is stage food and the
wine is colored water, but the realism
is Intense. The climax of shudders
was reached when I came to a block
in the center of a small square room.
Nailed to the chopping block, severed
midway between the wrist and elbow,
lay the dainty hand of a woman, just
as It had been chopped from the living
arm! The instant my eyes saw this
sight the cell seemed to resound with
the shrieks of the terrified woman,
and, although the hand 1 gazed upon
was of wax, the mental shock pro
duced was dreadful beyond conception.
—Brooklyn Eagle.
p ro
ARE LOFTIEST OF MINES.
Worked by Incas and Now to B*
Opened by New Company.
It Is thought that the old Caylloma
silver mines In Peru are probably sit
uated at a greater elevation than any
other considerable mines In the world.
Their altitude varies between 14,000
and 17,000 feet. They were worked by
the Spaniards In the sixteenth century,
and before that, It is believed, by the
Incas. An English company Is now
preparing a hydro-electric plant for
them. This plant will be situated at
an altitude of between 15,000 and 16,
000 feet. It will derive Its power from
a waterfall on the Santiago river, and
in a dry Beason from Lake Huaillacho,
one of the sources of the Amazon. The
power will be transmitted by cable
about three miles. At the highest
mines the pressure of the atmosphere
Is only eight and one-half pounds a
square inch, and water bolls 24 de
grees below the ordinary boiling point.
—Youth's Companion.
In the Cyclone Belt.
In the Cyclone Belt.
A Delta county farmer found a
feather bed In his yard Tuesday morn
ing. Not knowing whence it came he
began an Investigation and found that
the bed belonged to a man who lived
in Hopkins county, whose home was
destroyed the evening before by a
cyclone.—Honey Grove S igna l.
Figs Raised in Hothouae*.
Fresh figs raised in hothouses to
Madison, N. J.. are the very latest nov
elty in rare fruits brought to New
York. They are about the size of a
big strawberry and are sold for $3.75
a dozen. _
How She Prepared.
A French gentleman anxious to find
a wife for a nephew went to a matri
monial agent, who handed him his list
:>f lady clients. Running through this
to his wife's name, entered
desirous of obtaining a husband be
tween the ages of 28 and 35—a blonde
preferred. Forgetting his nephew, he
hurried home to announce the discov
The lady was not at
"Oh yes," she said,
1 put it down when
ill in the winter and the
he came
I s
to his wife,
all disturbed.
ery
•that is my name.
«on were so
doctors said we must prepare for the
worst."
Irish Art.
Every nation must have its own art,
as distinct and separate from that of
other countries as its language: and
Ireland Is to find her «oui and
found her own school of art, it can
only be done for her by her own
A teacher from England or
abroad would be a most dangerous
experiment.—J B. Yeats, R. H. A., in
The Shanacbie. _
lf ever
ar
tists.
The Superior Man.
The superior man if
Confucius:
in his words and earnest to hti
slow
conduct.
Deaf Mute's Breach of Promise.
What is believed to be the first
breach of promise case in which both
parties are deaf and dumb is downi for
hearing before the Johannesburg high
The plaintiff Is a pretty Boer
defendant is the son of
of the Grand Station
rourt.
Ctrl and the
the proprietor
hotel, Jenneatown.— Loadoa Exprès.
Lucky for Politician*.
But what a merciful thing for poli
ticians it Is tha* the genera) public is
afflicted with extraordinary shortness
of memory!—Free Press, Singapore.
FOR THE HOME NURSE.
Importer! to Remember When Caring
for th« Sick.
The first rule In nursing, the first
essential to the patient, without which
all else you do la aa nothing, la to
keep the air be breathes as pure as
the external air without chilling him.
Always have the window of your
patient's room open, but not a window
on a passage just outside.
Place the bed in the lightest, spot
in the room, and he should be able
to see out of the window.
The best bedding is an iron bed
stead. a hair mattress, no curtains or
vailance, very light blankets for a
covering, as weak patients are
ways distressed by weight in bed
clothing.
Cleanliness of the skin in almost all
diseases Is of the utmost impor
taice.
Care should be taken in sponging
or washing not to expose too great
a surface at once so as to check per
spiration says Woman's Life.
Never allovf a patient to be waked
out of a sleep, either Intentionally
or accidentally, as this does serious
harm.
Do not whisper or walk on tip-toe,
as this is peculiarly painful to the
sick.
ai
Remember, never to lean against,
sit upon, or shake, or even touch the
bed upon which your partent lies; thl#
is always annoying.
Do no talk to or allow your patient
to talk while taking his meal.
FIRE OON'TS FOR THE HOME.
Observance of Theae Will Graatly Re
duce Danger of Disaster.
Never turn on the gas, and. when
your match goeB out before you have
ignited the gas, step away. And an
other, and light it. Series of horrible
accidents have resulted from this.
When grease or fat boils over on
the stove, do not throw water on it.
it will make it worse. Cse baking
soda or salt. Ashes will smother it.
Do not use a flexible rubber hoae in
connection with your gas stove. It
is dangerous and has caused hundreds
of tires and deaths.
At no time close the door of the
cook stove so that a strong draft will
operate, and then leave the room for
and great time. Overheated stoves
are responsible for a great many
fires.
One of the greatest of all Are dau
gers is to have heating pipes close
to the woodwork or rafters.
A swinging gas bracket la a con
stant menace to the home. If you
use one, have the burner protected by
a wtre screen, or a globe.
Ashes thrown on the floor, or In
wooden receptacles, frequently caute
fire.
pound chicken. Cut up and pour over I
one-half gallon water. 8tew until ten
dor. Salt to taste. Keep filled with
boiling water if necessary. There
should be at least one quart of broth
when chicken is done. Add one tea
apoon butter unless fat. Take one
heaping tablespoon flour rubbed
smooth, with one-half cup milk add
ed gradually. Add to this a small
amount pepper and salt Stir this to
the chicken. Let come to a boll. Set
h«rk of ranee
Prepare crust as follows: Two
heaping cups flour, measured befor*
sifting, one half teaspoon salt, two
heaping teaspoons baking powder. Stir
all together with spoon. Add one la
blespoon lard. Work to well. Tlan
stir In with long handled spoon enough
sweet milk for a soft dough. Have
board floured and work dough lightly
with fingers. Roll to a round shape
one half Inch thick. Cut gash to cen
ter Place this on chicken and gravy,
which has been poured to a granite
three or four inches deep. Bake |
Chicken Pie.
Procure a three and one-half or four I a
pan
tn quick oven 16 minutes.
Drive Away Anta.
To rid the house of roaches or ante |
ten cent package of borax, with I
cents* worth of camphor gum. 1
Grind the gum to a powder and
sprinkle with the borax* Scatter |
around where the roaches and anta I
They will disappear In a few days. |
The first day or two it will set them to j
crawling as they are trying to es
cape. Bb sure to sprinkle it around I
plentifully the first time and leave I
it for several days. When you wash j
be sure to sprinkle more after a I
week or two. After the first, or some
times the second time, you can keep |
the pest* away by using the borax I
use a
ten
art
up
alone.
Charming Flowar Gifte.
One of the moat charming little I
gifts seen to many a day are the dl
mlnutive .but exquisite flowering I
plants, each set to a decorated china
pot. The variety of flower# to be •**
lected are numerous,' such a» tulips.
violets, hyacinths and lovely little roae
These, fascinating souven
trees, etc.
1rs were first brought out this year,
and so great was the holiday craxe
that they disappeared tn a day or two.
they are little object* of the best art
work in china of extreme correctness
in flower modeling and of great beauty
of color, for that reason are fit gift*
They elicit roost en
for a queen,
thustasic admiration —Vogue.
Flower* for Interior Decoration.
When arranging branches of bloom
from cherry or apple tree for Indoor
decoration at this season, bear in
mind the exquisite reaaits the Japan
PS< . get by placing a single spray at
two in a beautiful vaae, and do not
spoil the effect by massing a great
bunch of theae lovely blossoms la oa*
jar—Vogue
a
I
AS TO
SUCKERS
"You look as if you wer« up against
again," remarked th* proprietor ol
the all-nleht lunch room to the rav
eled young man who had ordered a
stack of browns.
• You're a good guesser," said the
man. flooding hi* cakes from
young
the sirup p scher tor the second time
U. it erne ia 1.00« years you call
the turn on me."
Whet's the trouble?" asked the
inuch room proprietor. "Ain't the suck
ers tyrin' no more?"
"There ain't no suckers no more,"
reptted <h f raveled young man
Thfv've ?«; wise. Tyke FYirney got a
a week ago and rotl
d him for his wad—had him doped
It took him all
ay on th*
•roc«» an' proper, too.
the Bight, but he done It. an - wotcher
Ttak? He didn't get nothin' but a
dollar »»ifh an' 70 cent»' worth o'
thick n feed fr all hia work. Wotcher
think o' that?'*
"Tyke's work's genin' coarse." said
the lun< h room proprietor. "He didn't
aster bug no | arkages o' soap."
"It « ain't no soap package," said
tho young roan,
dourh ripht on him Tyke don't do no
coarse work l bet tf he'd aaked him
• here be d got It hid the guy would
have told him. but Tyke didn't think
It wsa nesa'ry. He got him in Dugan'#
back room so dopy Dugan thought he'd
croaktd him an' went through him
with a fine tooth comb They ripped
up the a am In hla vest an' the linin'
In his cap an' they took the .Insoles
out of his shoes, an' then they didn't
r.t nothin'. They fln'ly give It up an'
threw him out In the alley and tome
body com*» along an' took him t# th«
station Then It came out where he'd
got hts wheat dividend#. It wa# In
1200 bills pasted on his veat bark
with a porous plasted. That fat cop
Pederson told Tyke about It an' give
him the laugh. Wotcher goln' to do
when they're gHtln' as foxy as that?
You'd have had to take the hide off
of that guy to get at them bllla.
I Wouldn't that Jar you?"
"Skin game," commented the lunch
"The Jay had the
room proprietor.
"Sure thing.
«uckere lelt.
know as much as you an' me do,"
"You can leave me out,' aald the
lunch room proprietor. "I don't make
tny customers show stlfkita o' (mod
character before they gtt their beans,
but 1 ain't couplin' up with all of 'em.
either. 1 don t pretend to be aa floaay
as yon an' Tyke."
"Sure," agreed the raveled young
"You've got pin feathers through
t run on to a
No, there ain't no
They've got ao they
man.
your shoulder blades,
good thing with a red neck a couple
o' days ago. though. 8|a»ttcd him com
in' out o' the Rock Island an' sold him
three-quarter carat diamond ring I'd
I I"» 1 picked up in the street for *lf> 1
wasn't goto' to tap him for more n a
dollar or two at first, but it com« so
easy l raised ». Course I might of ad
vertl*ed that ring an got I*. •**»»(■'
*-r returntn It, but l didn t have the
time to do It. . „
'You ought« t to be broke, then,
I a
P^tor
'' ««*»*«. CH ? °,TuJ
"<><»dn « have been either, f 1 hadn t
Into Dutch Henry a last night
«' B * Ht 0 Kreat *""** n,nnln ,b * r *'
but if he ain't got to deUto from .
I»b«n.v
com« out like he had I neverdld h.vt
no «'^ 'n that loint ve gon. ag In
that bo* o Henry * 20 times, an 1
**"* "**",* . . " . h4t
Henry» do»
opened up, a BJt
"He s cleanto up plenty, but It dont
<l0 „ SuTthTÎeaaon
WBalB ,n ' r ' a8 ' ,n . .
' lakes It all down to that buck
et shop over on the nm He * a
smooth guy. Henry (a, but be like# to
look at them chalk marks on the board
too well. That ain't an eaay game to
beat, an' don't you never think It I*.
If you do, Henry can tell you dtfr
rent,"
room miiIUmT
there Is no sucker# no more." he re
marked "I wonder what kind of gold
bricks the guy that run# that bucket
shop buys?"
Method in His Friendship
A young man who was graduated
from the College of I'hysietun* and
Burgeons as a throat apeetallst began
to cultivate musical people. "I don t
care a rap about music myself," be
said, but I want to stand to with all
the singing teachers, so they will »end
their pupils to me for treatment Biu
dents of vocal music always are link
The proprietor of the all night lunch
"1 thought you aald
ertllg w uh thetr throat«. Sometime*
they try to do their own doctoring,
sometime* the teacher prescrit»«« for
tbenj. A# a rule, however, the fe*cb
er advises Consulting «orne specialist
whom he happen* to know. Consider
(n(s ({,« number of «»plrants to music
f BCTM . that New York holds. It pay#
to be the particular friend that stands
|„ W )tb the instructors
Peculiarly Fi«*d.
"Sappy was Ju»t telling me be was
determined to g» to Umdoti and re
side there thereafter"
thinks that * Just th# place tor htm
•Whyr
that he can wear a monocle without
twisting hi* face all out of *hape"
Tea, to
"Well, he ha* discovered
sympathize with my view*, »aid the
theoretical statesman _
"Undoubtedly, answered the prac •
"But sympathy is ail
Encouragement.
"1 am sure th« publie «111 team tu
ileal polltlcten
;«« «*» '—Wsshlagton Stay.
Th« captain talU a .tory »Weh run.
something llk« this: 1« camp oa«
morning th« Sr« sergeant reported
that Privat« B- had a chill- "la It
a »«Ho«# on«r asked th« captain
"Wall. air. I dont know Juat how »eri
oua it ta. hut It'a a big on*. tor »
to h« all om him. and he
weigh* Ï00 pound*. On a«*ing hint
the capta'a found him looking raihar
bin«, and instructed th« 8r*t *«r««ant
to »end him to the surf ton In chart«
of a corporal i
Soon after breakfast the captain
saw th« corporal and aaked him how I
th« man waa t«ttln« on. *Oh, be'«
all right now," ana the reply. "I took
him up to th« hoapltal tent and -he» !
I s*w what kind of m«dtctn* th« doc- |
or gave htm I had a chill too.**—Army
a.d N«vy_Uto
THOUGHT CHILD WOULD OIK.
TREATMENT INOUCCO A CHILL.
Remedy Given In Hoapltal Tant Moat
Who la Body Cav*r«d with Cuban Itch
—Cutlcura R«m«di«a Cured at Coal
of Seventy-Ftve Cent».
!
1
"My little hoy, when only an Infant
of three month*, caught ih« Cuban
Itch Sore# broke out from hi* head
the bottom of hl» f«*t Ha would
Itcb and claw him»«If and cry alt (he
tim*. H« could not al««P day or nlgtal.
and a light dre»» la a» h# could w«ar.
I called on« at oar beat doctor* to
treat him. hut he tmenicd to got wofa*.
He autferad ao terribly that my hua
band »aid h* believed he would b*v*
to dl« I had »Unoat given up hope
when a lady friend told me to try the
Cutlcura Remedle*. I u»«l Cull
Soap and applied the Cut lepra
to
cur*
otatmant and ha at once fell Into a
•leep, and b* »lept with aa»e tor the
first time since two month*. After
three application# the aorea began to
dry up. and In Juat two week» from the
day I commenced to uae the Cutlcura
Remedle# my baby wa» entirely well.
The treatment only coat me 7Sc. and I
would have gladly paid *10« If 1 could
not have got It cheaper, f feel *afe la
saying that the Cutlcura R«*med»ea
saved hla life. He la now a boy of ft va
Mr» 7.»na Miller, Cnton City.
years.
R. r. n. No. 1. Branch O«., Mich., May
17. 1«06."
With a Previa».
"VThen unlveraal peace ta finally •»
tabllshed, M »aid Alfred H. lxive. the
president of the Universal Peace un
Ion, In an Interview In Philadelphia,
"then many a man who now ridicule»
tb« peace movement will claim to
hkva been It* lifelong champion. It
ta always ao. W* thump and kick a
poor, weak, struggling movement at
Us Inception, and when It haa succeed
ed and no longer needs our help, w#
give It th# moat aolldtoua »apport.
Thera waa once a young lady whoa*
betrothed, a vary poor young man,
•it about to aet out tor South Amerl*
to seek hts fortune In the rubber
tmda. As he took hi* leave of her the
night before hts departure, be aatd.
tremulously. And you »wear to be
•Yea. Hebar.' cried
; B
true to me. Irene?'
tb* girl; ye*—tf you're #ucc«**ful '
fiatiafled.
A seedy looking loafer, having or
dered and eaten a large and eumptu
dinner, explained to tb* waiter
ous
that he had no money.
The waiter immediately told th*
restaurant proprietor, who *#nl for a
policeman.
The proprietor, going up to tb« un
welcome gttcat, explained that he had
■eat for a policeman
"Thank goodne**' you didn't «and
the needy one
for a stomach pump*
replied, with hug* contento>*ot -H
lust rated Blta.
Har OI»»a*a.
One day Marjorie, aged three, want
ed to play doctor with her
Marjorie wa* ihe 'doctor," and ah*
te make a call on her Hater.
•tali I
came
who made believe *b* wa# alck
want to know what you've got
"Do
you
the doctor aaked, after * critical «*
"Yea." faintly *a#*t»ted
You've got dirty
amination
Ute alck woman
hands. ' said Marjorie, dropping to dt#
gust th* wrist on which ah* had been
feeling the pulae
DOCTOR'» FOOD TALK
»«lection of Food On# of too Moot Im
portant Acta In Lift.
A Maw doctor says
and physical and mental happfoeaa
arc- ao largely under our personal con
trol that th* proper «election of food
should be, and is on* of the moat Im
Our health
portant act» la Ilf«
"On thl* subject, I may say that 1
know of no food equal in dig««!Utility,
and more powerful tn point of nulri
ment, than tb«' modern Orape-Npta,
four heaping tc«»pnon* of which Is *«f
Sclent for the rereal part of a meal,
and experience demonstrate« that the
user Is perfectly nourished from owe
meal to «nother.
"I am convinced that the exteaatve
•nd general na« of high etna* food* of
thl* character would Increaae th* term
»>f human life, add to tha tan total of
and very consbterahly Im
happl
prove society I» general I am fr** to
ment Pm tb* food for I personally
know at Its value."
Grape-Nuts food can b# uaed fey
baltes In arms, or adult*
cooked, can fee served lastaatly. |
either cotd with cream, or with trot
water or hot milk famrod over. AH j
•oris of puddings and fancy dlvbo eau
fee made with Orape Sate Th* torsi
j «te*t tor the cereal pen m a meal ■
| Read the lml* hook "The Road to
WeUvflle,** la pkga Tteri a Haa
la concentrated sad very aeano B B i ral . j
for tour heaping teaspoons are sa®
Historic titan* for Sato. '
Itiuai tstand. !» the Inner Hofe |
nàm. watch ties between th« «*»»
taad of Scotland.and th* lala of Skr«,
haa failed to «ad » purchaser al the
0RWt price of SML*W placed upon !t
its «um I* th« Bcaadtoavtaa for "the
ptac# of th« ro* deer," and th« »fc«ot
,*« with th« »aa»loo hott»« and
g^uada at th» «eutberw ead, «MMth
tM ,, th» chief value of th« Ulaad
s*ar th« norih*ru «nd ar» th« ruin*
0 f proche! caatl». th« reuldeue* of It*
ancient laird*, th« hai**da t*
coltle lor« Raaaay ha* a place and In
Ragland luvrwtur« it ia m«ntk»»«d in
Samuel John*«*» » Journey to Ihf
Wealara Inland» of Scotland
Mata tw awmem «• r«.««..» M
r*»«s J *£»»*•* .TÄ
ÇgJKs*w*îî» , tto «* to»«- < —•»> •»* *"*•
.£«•■*' XA&SàtifiS V S&VXJÎ
| w k«.<u •*»» <«**>• *• t»»**Vr »*•■«» «J
u »«•*•'»£»**»»* ra*vty t msvtv
****** 4 Vwu..««M>*
| »»'J^ »«tswPeas».
Hsu's MM Car* It tsas* S wojW aa* asjs
«»««if >» •*• SS-» "Itîroîi *'* rt **** ** '**
T*7*c«M*ra «.•»-. »
ttra.?2Krtöw , 's»MM * (flâlhffll

Amblflucu».
At the death of a much loved paa
«or aome rear* ago the v**«ry of a
! prominent New York chureh reaotved
1 to place a tablet to hla memory In
«h* ebarrh, 1*11#
In du« tim« th*
the vatrtlbule of
llarper'a Weekly
tablet appeared tu it» place, where II
•till romain»
few »mil««, tot after reclrtng a Hat
the former p**i»t * virtu«* and I*
bora. It do»«« with th* quotation
Now the people of t»od have rent *
ll ha# iau**d not a
of
Old German Warefetpa Hidden.
Every Urn* the katoer vtatu Haut
•Ig. any* a l*»nu*m Mall corveepnnd
eat. all the Uld warships la the bar
bar are tawed to a position ta wblcb
them
be can
o
o
K
f
NATURE PROVIDER
FOR SICK WOMEN
a more potent remedy to the coot*
and beriet £=f the field than wa* ever
produced from dreg#
In Ute fund tdd f**htoned
our grandmother« few drug* were
um»! In tuedlctnee and Lydia K,
Pink ham. of Lynn Mae*,, to her
atudv of rout* and herb# and their
power over dlaeaae discovered and
gave to tha wumau at the world a
remedy fur their peculiar HI* mure
potent and elbceebm*
eombtoatiuu of drug«.
day« of
m
«
g-5
«5
any
IK!
.YulA E
Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound
1* aa honaat, toted and true remedy of uut p ta attow able thaeaaMMB _
During Its record at mat* tb»« thirty year* tt* In»» Itet *»f MktMM
tlioae aerbma til# .wcultar to worn*« cMtitl«* Lydia K flab bam*
Vegetable Compound to tti* raapeet aod euaUd*«*«» of aaarf »«to mtfiBBB
peruou and every thinking wumao.
When women are troubled with Irregular or painful fwacrtkNMt,
weak»»»*, dlaplaaamaet*. ubwraitot» or tofl*m»*«tkm, baabaaBa,
flatulency, gen«ml debility. todtgMtlm» or mvvum pruetoaUea* Nkfjf
should remember then» I* ** toted and tow* remedy, Lydia m. rlab*
ham * V
t'egetable t omtvxmd. . . .
No other remedy I» tb* country baa eweb a r*wté at *******
female ilia, and ttiouaaad* of wowwn f«*idl»» »■ ►*«»» Ff »*
Ntwto* bear willing te*ttm»wy to th« w*mderf«l vtrtM «I Lydia K rab>
bam * V
rgctable «mmpound »nd wl»»i It ha* *l«m* iw
Iflnkbem Invito* «II *l*b worn* a U» writ* b*v foe ad «tea W»* baa
guided thouaand* to he*ltb Vat tw.»ty fiv* v*ar* ab* bMbeea mtotolag
Hek woman trmm at «bar«» Mm I* tb* «laughtor la law at Lydte 8 Hab
ham and a* her *#*t*te«t tor year# bttat* her Om
I rommliato dlrwetkm. Aihlrwm, Lyna, Maaa
Mr«,
ALLEN '8 F 00 T-EA 8 E Swvl
A Cariai# Cwe lav Nat. At*** NdL AAA*~Vm-.—«L mKs. »to mate .
DO NOT AOOBNT A BUBBT1YUY*.
KC
BAKING POWDER
Stand* fori
K
Quality
Economy
i*urlty
In providing the family*» meat«,
don't be satisfied with anything hot
the best, K C ' is giutrantttä
turn at » moderate prie*. It make*
everything better.
Try aod see.
tuff*
1
mnumm*
Cutrtnfttd
uiuki »II
Putt food Urns.
ItMte« »«6 Ca
carters1^^TS*Hï?£
Wnlll LI\%) flwr oMrtw
waa
SKILLFUL SKILLMK. SKILLFGCL
Ift'ÂOTt^sl
Oau*d
Mas? B«r
fttfVftl •DtITiTUTtt.
I
I*» lyt Vats«
*»•* **• •***•
•% anderatand da* dor« offl B*
«ral bo«*» *•»"**>• «• <** »<*•*. ~
«ha k*u« »ad la**** trawp ** »« r "
u>« td*a "**V" Wanted
Y«*." rer»«l »*«*""T
way «am. 1 *» «**« »J**T"*T*
,* j« etephaat •*« »wo rat paraaar m
got»« to ptay de hin ! !«•*
Him* Tho» 1 »«nt»*« dt«o la m
chan. , ft«- a tail, thin »'»P* H*« ***•
Oh yea. r*ro you conitl P ! *J ••
n«ck of da «ira»*"
Prof »erg, la B«*»twn Ayr««, ana
diacoteted a spider which pracueaa
«»hin* at tim«* In »hallo» placwa It
*l**n« feet*««« stone» a two wtaged.
conical net. no which It run» la tha
** <rr ** d *' h ** 4 '
t*»*«*. etc
m " rk **" *" * fc ** w » * ,h «' »«««-roue
»hrtveled skis* of llttl» croatu»** that
Me ah»*ut in th* w«h ml
_ +££, Z!&*2»2!Tm~*sbm »
h»»*« •"**«*— .«•»»<*■*«« * fcsamos.
Scatter with aa* haadt *»1h«* «til
«wo Herman
A tpid*r That Fi»fe*a.
sag»
I
B
iit
*Gi
W, N. u. Bait taka City, No.
! —— R ~ ^
I ** mm** »
«I -■** '*•/ ■
y *»#
I rtoéMrt .«
THE OAtBY FLT KILL «» **^ g:.df
.cSâxal
[ l * i wi iiT 1 5*pSp
tmiwm****
t* f JLtm amrn t
V «1 NMF1 MMMM
Mmmmmßrn*
rnmê u* ftl
i.
mm Men* a nr ijmm, MTwata Ml
JPrXdP.s*.
laft^SSs
». ■.
ar
•' wh*a

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