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Montpelier examiner. [volume] (Montpelier, Idaho) 1895-1937, September 01, 1911, Image 2

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HGANTIC REVOLUTIONARY PLOT
AGAINST THE GOVERNMENT
HAS BEEN UNEARTHED.
.eadera Placed Under Arrest and
Letters Found ' Revealing Where
abouts of Hidden Arms and Am
muniton for Revolutionists.
Puerto Cortez, Honduras. - A glgan
:lc plot against the administration of
Eonduras has been unearthed. Theo
Hernandez and M. Ugorta have
found
loro
Letters were
been arrested.
vealing the whereabouts of hidden
ms and ammunition.
Hernandez was Jailed at San Pe
dro, where excitement is at
Ugorta was escorted to
fever
the
heat.
capital, Tegucigalpa, under an armed
He was incarcerated.
For
guard.
de
Presldent Davila, who was
mer
posed by the recent successful revo
lution headed by General Manuel Bo
nilla, who now is in Salvador, is sup
posed to be interested In the plot. The
arrests were made by orders of Pro
visional President Bertrand.
The letters mentioned that muni
tions of war were hidden near Pi
mlenta, and that
against the administration was to be
started at the election next October
of General Bonilla, the unopposed
candidate for the presidency,
aral Lee Christmas is In Tegucigalpa,
working to make hla little army the
best drilled and equipped in Central
the first move
ty
PORTUGAL POLITICS MUDDLED,
Lisbon—The political situation in
Portugal is taking a serious turn. The
Republican party is completely divid
«d The advanced element under the
leadership of Alfonso Costa, provis
lonal minister of justice, and the con
aervative section, under Antonio At
meida, provisional minister of the in
terior and Senhor Camacho, declared
the elections for the pres- |
Gen
America.
Divided, While
Republican Party
. Strikes Are Threatening.
open war at
idency, the Moderates
day.
winning tile
Strikes threaten to have a serious
effect on the country,
and cork cutters, lightermen and gen
eral dock workers are now out.
Dlaro Notlcaa reporta that at Moita,
Almada, Aldegallega, Alcohete
other villages opposite Lisbon, which
centers of the cork cutting indus
try, the people are abandoning their
homes in fear of acts of violence.
Forty thous
The
and
are
Battleship Utah Ready for Service.
Washington.—A powerful addition
to the navy was made on Saturday,
August 26, when the new battleship
Utah waa tnrned over to the govern
ment at Philadelphia and ordered to
Join the Atlantic fleet at Hampton
Roads. The great sea fighter iB of
super-dreadnaught class
bears enormous batterleB
twelve and thirteen-inch gunB.
will carry 4,100 officers and
Captain W. S. Benson will command
her.
und
tthe
of ten.
She
men.
and
it
ules
mend
The Utah is equipped
burners to be used when coal runs
out, or when more advantageous un
der battle conditions to avoid smoke.
Girl Masquerading as Boy.
SaR Lake City.—Beatrice Knitting,
aged 17, has disappeared from her
home In this city and is supposed to
be roaming around dressed In boy's
Some time Friday night
Two
clothing.
the girl donned a suif of her broth
er's clothes, and clipping her long
hair, wrapped this in her own cloth
ing and hid the bundle in the cellar
of an adjoining house. Since
road
its
way
then she has not been seen.
Crickets Destroy Grasshopper Eggs.
Minneapolis — M. P. Somers, grass
hopper expert, state department of of
entomology, after a summer-long in- an
vestigation In the grasshopper infest- his
ed districts of Minnesota and the Red The
River valley, declares the crickets and
have an insatiable appetite for grass
hoppers' eggs and are eating them by
the millions. tng.
Breaks Motor Record.
Terre Haute, Ind.—Charles Herman
of Terre Haute, in the Terre Haute
motorcycle club's 100-mile race at the
Vigo county fair grounds
broke the world's motorcycle record.
His time was 2 hours. 13 minutes,
35 1-5 seconds.
red
of
of
of
but
Sunday,
not
Negro Makes Escape.
Durant, Okia.—After searching eigh
teen hours for an unknown negro
who attempted to asBault Mrs. A. VVI1
kersoB at Colbert, fifteen miles south
of here, Saturday evening, the pur
suit was dropped by the sheriff,
ton.
Picture Man Injured.
San Francisco.—Isaac Burns, an op
orator of a moving-picture machine,
probably fatally injured by the
was
explosion of a film in the Hayes Street
theater Sunday.
None of the spee
tators were injured.
Plan to Eclipse Record
St- Louis.—Plans for a trans-Mis
sissippi river hydroplane next month
of not less than 1.500 miles, sufficient
to eclipse the world's record Just es
tablished by Harry N. Atwood,
•well under way here.
Women Enter Politics.
Philadelphia.—A new political party,
the object of which will be to de- |
feat Instead of elect candidates for
public offices will be formed in Phil
adelphia by prominent society and suf
fragette leaders.
Keene a Sick Man.
London.—The health of J. R. Keene.
ttmuiflm-. is causing his
LIFE'S DISAPPOINTMENTS
ah ha: LETTER FROr
THC BOSS!
WHERE I GET THAT
LONG - PROMISE D
RAISE! _^
m
(5
i
»
of
in
O
\fh
i
DCS. O LPÄtTT D @ KJ 1
KSACLOS /SSiTFOCSjCJ
f Copy right. 1011.!
CRY CF FIRE CAUSES PANIC
Twenty-five Persons Killed and More
Than Sixty Injured as Result of
Explosion of Picture Film.
Cannonsburg, Pa.—Twenty-five per
sons were killed and more than six
ty injured Saturday night when a
moving picture him, exploded in the
Cannonsburg opera house. Immed
iately following the flash of the film,
some person shouted "lire!" There
was a rush for the exit and in a mo
ment there was a writhing, scream
ing mass of humanity in the narrow
stairway leading to the entrance of
the theater. The panic, It is said, was
senseless. Most of the dead were
smothered. A r^eat majority of tne
audience was composed of women and
children. In the fierce rush for the
exit they were thrown from their
feet and trampled on. Others were
thrown upon them and those at the
| bottom of the human pile were suffo
cated.
TAFT OPENS CAMPAIGN
Keynote Speech Made by President
In Maeaachusetts.
Taft
Mass.—President
began the presidential campaign ot
1912 on Saturday, his friends believe,
in a speech that breathed defiance
and condemned the insurgent Repub
Hamilton,
llcans and Democrats, combined to re
vise several schedules of the present
tariff at tue special session of con
gress Just closed.
Thp president singled out Senator
La Follette of Wisconsin, Speaker
Champ Clark and Chairman Under
wood of tlie house ways and means
committee, as lenders of the attempt
ed revision and charged them with
"playing politics."
Several times he referred by name
to Mr. La Follette, but mentioned the
other insurgent senators merely as La
Follette's "associates."
Mr. Taft indicated that he regard
ed the proposed revision as injurious
and dangerous to business, but made
it plain that if the tariff board in
December reported that downward
revision of the cotton and wool sched
ules should he made, he would recom
mend a reduction.
to
DEATH STEERS IN RACE.
Two Killed in Automobile Road Race
at Elgin, Illinois.
Elgin, 111.—The 305-mile automobile
road race on Saturday, won by Len
a
race
National, with Harry
and Hugh Hughes
Zengel in a
second
Grant
third, was not accomplished without
its toll of death and injuries.
David Buck, veteran Chicago auto
mobile racer, was within eleven la^s
ish
of the finish, going sixty-four mile«
an hour on the back stretch, when
his right forward wheel threw a ti/e.
The machine turned a
and Sam Jacobs, mechanician, was his
instantly killed. Buck's back waB
broken and be died Saturday * Ten '|°
tng.
somersault
Another accident, in which thirty
Injured, mostly slightly, occur- I
were
red while the first lap of the race i
of the I
l!ber
, ,
dropped entirely to th e ground. |
. .
Denver. Estranged from hia ^nde^
of two months and seeing no hope
of a reconciliation, Emile Verburgghe, ;
aged 31. shot himself through the
right temple Saturday night while
seated on the porch of the residence :,
of Jean Mlgnollet, Belgian consul.
where his wife lias been living since
Several sections
on.
was
poorly built grandstand
but the thousands of spectators were |
gave way
not
All for Love of Woman.
pur
iparation.
the
Will Launch La Follette Boom.
Duluth, Minn.—L,ocal men
rank
have received invitations to a ban- j
quet in Minenapolis, September 7. at
which a boom for Senator La Fol- j
lette for president is to be launched, j
who
op
the
progressive Republicans j
spee
Youthful Lover Spanked.
San Bernardino, Cal.—After having
attempted In vain to elope with Tes
sie Bowman, a year his Junior, Ralph
Terenary, 14 years old, leveled a re
volver at her father and was soundly
Bpanked as the result.
Tosses Sweetheart Into Lake.
Holland, Mich.—Angered, he said,
because Grace Lyons of Chicago broke
her promise of marriage, Walter Hop
per of Chicago attacked her on board
tbe steamer Puritan in mid-lake and
tossed her overboard. Her body was
not recovered.
Ten Injqfed in Train Wreck.
Dayton, Ohio.—A passenger train
es
party,
de- |
for
Phil
suf
his
at
the
level
level
gave
was
and
COACHES GO OVER TRESTLE
Score or More of Passenger* Killed
in Peculiar Accident to Train
Which Carried Veterans.
Manchester, N. Y -Twenty-five per
their
sons are known to have lost
lives and between fifty and sixty to
have been injured, many of them ser
ously, In the wreck of Lehigh Valley
train No. 4 on a trestle near here on
Friday.
Two crowded cars, plunging off the
structure, were hurled against the
stone embankment and dropped to the
bed of Canandaigua outlet, forty-five
feet below, when the fast running
eastbound train was derailed and
broken in twain on the viaduct. An
other car rolled down the embank
ment beyond the river. The remain
ing eleven cars of the train kept the
roadbed.
The first car which went over, a
day coach, plunged to the creek bed
and was crushed upon the rockB.
landed upon its side and few of the
occupants escaped death or
injury. The following car plunged
head-first into the chasm and with
the forward end resting in the creek,
stood balanced almost perpendicular
in
el
It
serious
to
iy.
The train carried many veterans re
turning from the G. A. R. encampment
at Rochester, and at least two of the
old soldiers are known to have gone
to their death in the wreck. A large
proportion of those killed and injured
were women.
Little Leniency Expected.
Washington.—Settlers under west
ern reclamation projects may expect
very little leniency from Director
Newell In the matter of deferred pay
interviewed here upon his
ments.
return from his tour of the northwest,
Director Newell made the significant
statement tthat there was "nothing
paternalistic in the government's Ir
rigation work." and suggested that
they must be "educated to make them
understand that success will
only to the man who works hard and
studies conditions around him."
come
Novelist Blames Poet.
New York.—Upton Sinclair, author
and socialist, issued a statement Wed
nesday night saying that as soon as
he could get in touch with hl% lawyer
and have the necessary legal papers
drawn. It was his purpose to enter
suit against his wife for divorce. He
said he would name as co-respondent
who recently
young
was a
home at Arden. Del.
visitor at the Sinclair summet
Bandits Release Dr. Richter.
Turkey.—Dr. Edmund
German engineer, who
Salonika,
Richter, the
was captured May 25 by Greek ban
dits, is now on his way to the Turk
ish frontier, having been released by
when they were hard
his captors _ . , , , 8ent
pressed The ban(1 i tg de .
ut d ransom Q f »225,000 for his
release.
Widows Win Their Suit.
the 24 fire
Chicago.—Widows of
men killed in the stockyards Decem
l!ber 21. 1910, won a victory in their
geht, for an immediate distribution of
re j l€ . f fund of $211000 raised for
their benefit, when Judge Cooper on
Saturday entered an order directing
,. omm1ttee lo lna ke the dis
.. ..
vigorous Campaign in Canada,
Ottawa, Ont.— The Canadian elec
:, ion precipitated by the. American
rel .j pr oclty treaty is in full blast, and
(B onf>
ever bid i
f the» most heated campaigns
Canada.
Exchange Lands.
.ne state of Idaho
States government
j b ave agreed to exchange about 600.
j()04> acres of land in thaï state so that
j ea <-h may have it.» lands in a
j compact body than at present.
Washington.—
j an d the Utnted
more
Favor the Hurd Law.
Denver. Colo.—The executive board
of the Western Federation of Miners
went on record Friday in favor of the
Hurd eight-hour law and authorized
a vigorous campaign to keep the bill
from being referred to the people
Chicago's Population.
Is
Chicago.—Chicago's population
2,264.184, according to announce
now
ment made by the publisher* of the
figures
increase of 78,901 over the
These
new city directory,
show an
federal census made a year ago.
Sawmill Men Strike.
eBaumont, Tex.—Because
struggle between the lumber laborers'
-xxaxizm ami thfl sawmill owners, opera
of the
MEET DEATH IN MINE
SEVEN MEN DEAD AND THREE
INJURED IN FIRE IN A
NEVADA MINE.
Accident Caused by Oil Explosion,
the Men Being Caught on the
1,400-Foot Level and Forced
to Paae Through Flamea.
Ely, Nev.—Seven men met death
and three others were seriously in
jured early Thursday In a fire which
swept the new five-compartment shaft
the (il roux -Consolidated Mines
company here. Two bodies remain
the workings. Both shafts of the
mine have been sealed to smother
the flames.
The tire was caused, it is believed,
by the explosion of a barrel of oil
at the pumping station on the 1,200
foot level of the new Bhaft. Ten men
were working at the 1,400-foot level
at the time, and they looked up to see
the shaft above them Ailed
flames.
They at once boarded the cage an6
started for the surface,
countered the flames at the 1,200-foot
level and Btopped.
Five of the men left the cage and
started to walk through the 1,200-foot
level to the old Alpha shaft, 700 feet
away, through which they hoped to
climb out of the mine.
The five men remaining in the cage
gave the signal to hoist and
pulled through the blazing shaft. One
was dead when the top was reached
and the others were taken to a hos
pital.
The work of rescuing the five men
remaining in the mine was then at
tempted through the Alpha shaft, but
without success.
wtih
They en
were
AVIATOR MAKES LONG FLIGHT.
Atwood Completes Trip from 8t. Louis
to New York in Aeroplane.
New York.—Sailing serenely over
New York's myriad water craft, its
ferryboats and ocean liners, Harry S.
Atwood, the Boston aviator, arrived
in New York in his aeroplane on Fri
day, the first man in history to trav
el as far as from St. Louis to New
York by way of Chicago In a heavier
than-air machine.
Atwood's flight Is comparable only
to that made by fast trains, for he
covered the distance in an actual Hy
ing timo of 28 hours and 34 minutes.
Atwood's final lap in his long jour
ney was a glide of twenty-five miles
from Nyack, where he had stopped
overnight. He landed, smiling, hatless
and hungry, in the arms of a hand
ful of United States army officers
and men who hailed him as Ameri
ca's greatest aviator.
Disappeared on Wedding Day.
Butte, Mont.—The badly decompos
ed remains of Mrs. Jessie Moore, an
attractive young widow, who disap
peared mysteriously in July Just prior
to the date set for her wedding, were
found late Thursday in the rear of the
Columbia Gardens, a pleasure resort
east of Butte,
The authorities are
that
for
ing
out
too
not able to
der or suicide was the cause of death.
William Dobson, a miner, the woman's
fiance, was arrested.
insurance Companie» Condemned.
Milwaukee Wis.—The special com
mittee of the insurance commlsBion
of the United States made pub
lic at Milwaukee, August 23, a report
of its Investigations. In this report
the business methods of a number of
industrial, heath and accident insur
companies were very strongly
ance
criticised by the committee, which at
the same time made public a list of
fourteen insurance companies whose
methods It had examined.
ns
hold
union
set
their
The
he
his
who
will
Girl Leads Hoid-ups.
Chicago.—Led by a 20-year-old girl,
four men held up Casimir Kranz on
Friday and robbed him of
watch and $5, then severely beat him
and threw him over a fence into a
Detectives who witnessed the
a gold
yard.
hold-up captured Kitty Klinski, leader
Maw rot, 18
of the band, and Paul
years old, after a revolver fight in
which half a dozen shots were fired.
Rebels Occupy Jlpljapa.
Vinces, Ecuador.—Rebels under Col
onel Carlos Alfaro have occupied the
town of Jipijapa.
with 200 men. sailed from here
The cruiser Bolt
var.
Friday for Man Manta to Join the 800
government troops now operating in
Manlhi under General Trivlno.
Tobacco Crop Short.
Ky.—The Burley to
bacco crop of Kentucky, which was
last year estimated to be 300,000,000
to more
Lexington,
pounds, will not amount
than 50,000,000 this year, it is believ
ed. owing to drought.
Langford Drops Another Dub.
York.—Sam Langford, the
heavyweight, knocked out
New
BoBton
Tony Rosa of Pittsburg in the sixth
round of their scheduled ten-round
the National Sporting club
is
bout at
here Thursday night.
Five Killed When Bridge Collapsed.
men were
the
bill
lloseburg. Ore.—Five
killed and five others injured late
Thursday when a large bridge over ;
river, sixteen mlleB
the Umpqua
northwest of here, collapsed and fell I
into the rier. sixty feet below.
Captures Moose Convention.
Detroit.—Kansas City will get the
1912 meeting of the Ixtyal Order of
Moose, according to the vote taken
Thursday at the national convention ol
the order here. Los Angeles was the
nearest competitor.
Woman Chauffeur Arrested.
Chicago.—'Mrs. F. P. Ellsworth, who
for several weeks has rented her aut
omobile as a public vehicle and act
Is
the
the
the
ON THEIR DAY OF DAYS
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Labor's Changing Ideal
It
RGANIZED labor's Ideal of a
short workday changes with
varying conditions. At one time
r it was customary to work 12 or
more hours per day, but as civilization
advanced the working day has been
steadily reduced.
In reducing the hours of labor the
unions have been chiefly Instrumental,
as they have In various tradeB estab
lished a shorter workday and then fol
lowed it up by legislation wherever
they have been strong enough.
Though "eight hours" may be the
objective which organized labor now
seeks to accomplish, it does not fol
low that eight hours is Ideal, or that
It will be the goal of the future. The
short-hour movement rests funda
mently upon necessity.
"The constant Improvement in ma
chinery and consequent displacement
labor, together with the further dis
placement of labor by the tendency
toward consolidation In all lines of In
dustry, must ultimately compel us to
choose between three things: First,
we may shorten the hours of labor to
distribute opportunity for employment,
or, second, we may tax property to
support the idle, or, third, we may
have revolution."
This masterly and unaswerable sum
ming up of the underlying causeB of
the short-hour movement was by a
statesman, no less than the late
Thomas B. Reed.
It follows that as long as machinery
and methods continue so to Improve
that less and less hours are required
for productive labor, the Ideal work
ing day will be shorter and shorter.
Labor does not expect to live with
out work—it complains that there, are
too many who live without work, and
0
of
Efficiency a Union Ideal
der
of
the
to
HE fundamental principles under
lying Lie conatitutfpn of the unit
ed brotherhood of carpenters
and Joiners of America compel
ns to recognize that the lntersts of all
classes of labor are Identical,
hold it as a sacred principle that trade
union men, above all others, should
set an example af good and faithful
workmen, performing their duty to
their employers with honor to them
selves and to their organization.
The mechanic, of whatever trade
he may be. In taking this obli
gation, feels It his dnty to become
more skilled, and for tha honor of his
organization he becomes more indus
trious and takes a greater Interest In
his work, knowing that his employer,
who has been carefully watching him,
will be more willing to accede to any
reasonable request that his ubion may
make In the form of shorter hours,
higher wages or more humane condi
tions.
I am well aware that the unfair em
ployer holds that nonunion labor is
more efficient than union labor, and
that his arguments have had goi&e
weight in forming public sentiment
against us in the past. But the fact
still remains that we have the best
We
Labor Day
The Toledo Blade thinks that those
that conceived Labor day bullded bet
ter than they knew.- They not only
taught themselves their strength, but
they emphasized the Idea that work
is the bond of brotherhood for all. The
key of the world Is work, and more
and more the part of the drone Is be
; coming harder to play.
"Perhaps this altered view might
I have come in the course of time any
way. It was preached by the car
penter of Nazareth centuries ago. But
labor has hastened Us entrance Into
public policy. The union Is but the
expression of a consideration for
others. Each man is working for him
self works for his comrade. In prac
tice, it has other definition, other
terms, but this is the underlying prln
ciple. And as the worker has striven
for the embodiment of an idea into
his personal life, so Is he bringing it
Into the life of all. The story of
labor Is not written. Its future U
—J- >.ir.ntt at bv a few far
it"
To provide work for the Idle affects |
the supply of and demand for labor
and favorably affects wages—as all
short-hour trades well know—but the
desire of the worker to have some
time for recreation and amusement
stimulates the demand for shorter
hours.
As our wage-earners become better
educated they become more deter
mined to have more of the benefit of
labor-saving machinery.
They desire more leisure that their
Industrial life may be prolonged.
It would like to make the hours short
enough so that all will have to work.
It notes that banking and profes
sional men work five hours or leas,
and hopes to reach the same Ideal
some time.
the
They desire their fellow-men to be I °
employed a
They desire good wages and realize «
that to preserve them their fellow
men must be employed.
The late George E. McNeill, called
the father of the eight-hour move
ment, said "Eight hours for work,
eight hours for rest, eight hours for |
what we will.''
This seems like an equitable dlrla-1
Ion as long as eight hours is the ol>
Jectlve, but as Invention follows lnven-1
tlon, It Is likely the figures will have
to be revised.
The ideal short hour workday Is the
shortest day possible that will give
good wages, and give the largest meas
ure of freedom, recreation and enjoy
ment to the worker, enabling him to
support his family, educate his chll- I
dren, and lay aside something for the
rainy day.
SAMUEL GOMPERS.
skilled men In our ranks, enlisted un- I
der the banner of trade unionism. In |
every city costly buildings are being
erected In which not only are the ma
terials the finest but the highest class
of skilled labor la required. Many of I
the more skillful workmen become ex- an
perts In the various branches of the of
bulldlng trades. The fact that men
are organized and meet every week tor
to discuss enconomlc and social ques-1 tor
tlons does not make them less, but iar
more intelligent. They take pride In | t i
their union.
Among the members of trade unions
are the highest skilled workmen, who
also represent the highest type of clt-1
lzenship. Men who come together for
mutual Improvement are prompted by
the loftiest motives.
As good citizens, the trade unionists
of
are continually working and spending
their money for the uplifting of hu
manity. We have reduced the hours I
of labor and raised the rate of wages
and shared them freely with the non
union man, who has allowed himself
to become the dupe of the employer
who has raised the question as to
the efficiency of union labor. | a
J. D. COWPER.
through sloughs of discord yet. bear,!
the sound of conflict and know the
bite of hunger, but In the end It will
conquer happiness and all the world'
good will and gratitude.
TO LABOR.
Shall you complain who feed the world'
Who clothe the world?
Who houae the world?
Shall you romplaln who are the world.
Of what the world may do?
Aa from thta hour
You
The world muet follow you.
it
of
U
far
your power.
The world's life hange on your right
hand. I
rZr Ä right Sand: !
Too hold the whole world In your hand— I
See to It what you do!
light,
Oi wrong or right.
The world I» made by you!
Or dark
rose before.
Then rise as you ne'er
Nor hoped before.
Nor dared before.
And show a* ne'
was shown betöre.
The power that Ilea la youl
Stand alt aa
Till right la done!
d dar« and do!
COMPLIANCE MEANS CHAOS
Kruttschnitt Tells Why Railroads Will
Refuse to Consent to De
mands of Workmen.
San Francisco.—That the granting
of the demands of the federation of
shop employees of the Hardman lines
would
would mean chaos, that
abridge or deprive the corporation of
the ability to fulfill the duties Im
posed upon them by the law, and that
the officers deliberately so betraying
their trusts as to agree to such an
arrangement would he
condemned by public opinion, was the
statement made Munday night by Jui
Kruttschnitt, vice president and
director of maintenance and operation
ot the Harriman roads.
Mr. Kruttschnitt took up In detail
the reasons for refusing the demands
ol the federated shopmen.
Ernest I.. Reguin, president of the
Federated Shop Employees of the
Harriman lineB, when shown
state mint by Mr. Kruttschnitt, de
clared he was confident, in spite of
the statement, that the demands of
tae shap employees would he granted.
"Mr. Kruttschnitt may change this
attitude," he said, "when he discov
ers that 99 per cent of the shopmen
ate standing by the federation."
universally
ins
! M
LOOKS BAD FOR BEATTIE.
v
Cousin of Man Accused of Murdering
Wife Swears That Prisoner Ad
mitted Crime. /
Chesterfield Courthouse, Va. —Paul
D. Beattie, cousin of Henry Clay
Beattie, Jr., who stands indicted for
the murder of his wife, testified late
Monday that the accused had told
him twenty-four hours after the mur
der how sorry he was "he had done
it" a circumstance relating to the
crime t|iat the witness hitherto had
suppressed.
Coming as dramatically and as un
expectedly as the pathetic tale of an
hour before of Mrs. U. V. Owen,
mother of the dead woman, as to the
| domeBtic infelicity of her daughter,
the brief but thrilling testimony
given by Paul Beattie created a pro
found sensation.
BROODING CAUSED TRAGEDY.
Grief Over Death of Wife Causes
Englishman to Murder Three
Children and Suicide.
Thomaston Me.—Grief over the
death of his wife led Edward Ben
nett, an Englisman, and a graduate
I ° f 0xfor<1 ""'versity who has been
a resident here for the last six years.
« murder his three children and
then take his own life on Monday,
Two of the children were killed by
the use,of chloroform, and the third
by cyanide of potassium and chloro
form.
| tain, the man went to the water's
nlde of potassium and jumped in. His
body was found when the tide re
ceded,
to
I known to be dead, many injured and
property damage of more tnan $1,
000,000 is the damage wrought by the
storm which struck Charleston Sun
day afternopn, isolating that city
from the rest of the world.
The greatest Injury to the city is in
!
To make his own death cer
edge and there took a doBe of cya
CYCLONE STRIKES CHARLESTON
Seven Person* Killed and Many In
jured at Result of Windstorm
In South Carolina. ,
Charleston, S. C.—Seven persons
being cut off from all wire communi
cation. The wreckage among houses
along the waterfront has been exten
sive. Telephone and telegraphic wires
and poles are down over the city,
un- I plate-glass windows broken and all
In | business is at a standstill,
Monday received from President Taft
an official certification of the passage
of the statehood resolution which au
thorizes him to issue a proclamation
tor an election of state officers and
tor a vote on the recall of the judlc
iar y clause of the original constitu
| t i on ,
Authorized to Call Election.
Phoenix,. Arlz.—Governor Sloan on
Protest Against High Prices
housewives, in protest against the
prevailing high cost of food were
checked and dispersed by the police
Monday when they threatened the
market men wlth violence. The prices
of butter and eggs, however, were
reduced following the demonstration.
Brest, France.—Two processions of
I
ft tent 8how « ave w ay, precipitating
| a hundred men, women and children
to the ground. A large number re
ceived cutB and bruises.
Panic at Tent Show.
Park City.—A panic, which might
easily have had grave results, occur
red Monday night when a tier of seats
Chain Broke.
TucBOn ' f rtl f - Tha , breakln * ° f a
human cba ' n iorm * d "» a °
1° rescu « Henry D. Hldy of Belle
Plain, la., from drowning in the Santa
Cruz rlver . cost Hldy his life. Hidy
was one of a party of picnickers
River Cuts New Channel.
Kan.—Recent heavy
rains in Nebraska and northern Kan
sas have caused the Blue river to cut •
a new channel and change its course
at this point, thus causing this city
to lose one of its beautiful views.
Manhattan,
r
Slncair Want Divorce.
I New York.—The marital difficulties
! Upton Sinclair and Meta Fuller
I Sinclair, who have been married elev
en years, reached a climax Monday
when the author brought suit for ab
solute divorce, naming Harry Kemp,
the poet, as co-respondent.
Fisher Reaches Interior of Alaska.
CordQva, Alaska.—Secretary of the
Interior Walter L. Fisher completed
Monday a 400-mile trip along the Cop
\er river valley into the Interior of

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