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Montpelier examiner. [volume] (Montpelier, Idaho) 1895-1937, September 01, 1911, Image 3

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86091111/1911-09-01/ed-1/seq-3/

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Boy Good« with a Reputation
from a Honte with a Reputation
We sell Oneida Silver, Big Ben
Alarms, Simmons Chains, Waltham
and Elgin Watches and all nation
ally advertised brands of goods in
our line. Write us.
Ja
SALT LAKE
Before sending your boy away
to a boarding school, investigate
ALL HALLOWS
COLLEGE
•ALT LAKE CITY, UTAH
CataUfu* tant Prit
Application
Rev. «I. J. Qulnan, President
Cash Reserve $1,350,786.25
When ■ statement was last died for by the net
retarr of atate—July 27—this bank had consider
ably more than twice
-
much cash reserve as
the proportion to deposits required by law. Hera
ia merely an incident to show the
tien with which the institution's resources a
handled. This bauk has facilities (or large coi
mercial accounts. It extends ancqually cordial
welcome to the person who wishes
savings account with $ 1 .
WALKER BROTHER8 BANKERS,
Sank hare by Mall. Salt Laka City
D ■
TA tdv
TO TRY OUR B. A T. TRUSS
We fit TrunieR, Shoulder Braces, Abdominal Sup
porter«, Elastic Honlery. The kind that please.
Fit guaranteed or money refunded. Mailorders
Cut Rata Druggists
Cor. Third So. and Went T emple. Salt Lake City
open a
MEN WANTED
,
prompt attention.
REX DRUG CO.
A POSITIVE ud PER
MANENT CURE FOR
Drunkenness and
Opium Diseases.
Tier« la *• publicity, m aickaess. Latii«a treated as
•matelr a. ia tWr ewa komcv THE KEELEY IN
IT1TUTE, 334 W. South T.mplr Street. Salt Uke City.
r'Keeley
'Vi re
Careful Kodak Finishing
Prompt, nkllful. Mail your Film, to
UR. Fresh Filin*. Packs and suppliea
ot all kinds. Write lor Inlormation.
THE JOHNSON CO.
Salt Lake City, Utah.
Box »63.
u
TAH BUSINESS COLLEGE
ltckNton ll.lilUlllK. ».au® Lltjr
Best in West by Tent." School all year.
Full Business and Shorthand Courses.
Write for information to E. C. Davis, Prin.
WANTED
MEN AND WOMEN to Learc
BarberTrade In Kiabt Week«.
_ Iag . , Tuition, with set of tool*. $65.
With partial set of tool«, $45. With your own
Address Molar Barbar Cel logo
1$ Commercial Street, Salt Lake City. Utah.
tool* ns,
KODAKS
DEVELOPING
PRINTING
Mull orders given special attention
Complete stock ot Photo Supplies.
Molmn-ParLir Hardware Co.
Service prompt.
Salt Lake City
The Editor's Drawer.
Mayor Speer of Denver was talking
about a bill of which he disapproved.
"Why, a bill like that," he said,
"would soon put the city in the con
dition of the Cinnarninson Scimitar.
"The foreman said to the proprietor
one day:
" 'We need a drawer, boss, to put
these blocks in.'
" 'We haven't got. a drawer that's
not in use,' said the editor j proprietor.
Then he paused and added, 'except
the cash drawer. You' might as well
take that." '—Chicago Inter Ocean.
Staving It Off.
The street piano was out our way
the other night and our next-door
neighbor didn't like it.
"Here's a nickel," he shouted to the
grinder, "If you'll go away at once."
"E3es der someboda wat ees seeck?"
naked the grinder.
"Not yet," answered our neighbor—■
"hurry!"—Cleveland Plain Dealer.
Overworked.
"You want something to eat?" asked
the woman with the gingham apron
at the back door, of the seedy-looking
man.
"Yes, ma'am," was the reply.
"Skit you look pretty healthy to be
begging. Haven't you any trade?"
"Ob, yes, ma'am; I've a trade, but
I've worn myself out working at it."
"What Is your trade, pray?"
"I'm a fly-swatter, ma'am!"
Golf and Kisses.
"Seashore golf seldom amounts to
much," said H. Chandler Egan, the
golf champion, on the Wheaton links.
''Seashore golf always suggests to me
the dialogue between Jack and Jill.
'"Oh, Jack, dear, don t!' whispered
Jill. 'The caddie will see us.'
" 'No, he won't,' said Jack. 'He's
too busy looking for the ball, and It's
In my pocket.' "
A Cure.
Judge—Why did you steal the gen
tleman's purse?"
Prisoner—I thought the change
would do me good.—Washington Star.
An Eye to the Future.
wir
that man the rooms?
Hutband —He looked so Ill-tempered
I was afraid I should never summon
up courage to raise his rent later on.
— Fliegende Blatter. .
Why did you refuse to give
The Test.
"Do you see that nice looking man
, over there? That's my favorite au
k, thor."
"What have you read of his."
"Nothing. But I danced twice with
him last night.— Fliegende Blatter.
New Sport in Cabinet.
Walter Lowrie Fisher, the new sec
retary of the Interior, Is an enthus
iast on baseball and football, and
steals enough time from his desk to
go to most of the games in Washing
ton.—Tbe Popular Magazine.
Dr. Piller— You must diet yourself ]
and eat plain food, and not stay out
late at night i
Patient—That is what I have been j
thinking ever since you tent In your
I««t bi n.
Forced to It.
SUCCESS IN BEE KEEPING
DEPENDS ON EXPERIENCE
By Vears of Association Keeper Almost Unconsciously
Acquires Understanding of Habits of Little Honey
Gatherer and Consequently Is Better Able
to Solve Many Problems Arising.
(By E. F. PHILLIPS.)
The successful manipulation of
bees depends entirely on a knowledge
of their habits. This is not generally
recognized, and most of the literature
on practical beekeeping consists of
sets of rules to guide manipulations
While the method usually
it is nevertheless faulty, in that with
a knowledge of fundamental prin
ciples of behavior, the bee keeper is
unable to recognize the seemingly ab
normal phases of activity, and does
not know
circumstances. Rules must, of
j be based on the usual behavior. By
years of association the bee keeper
I almost unconsciously acquires a wide
I knowledge of bee behavior, and con
j sequently is better able to solve the
' problems which
I However, it would
answers.
our
what to do under such
course.
constantly arise
save an- Infinite
number of mistakes and would add
. .
firent Jy to the interest of the work
!
if more time were expended on a
study of behavior; then the knowl
edge gained could be applied to
tlcal manipulation.
prac
A colony of bees consists normally
of one queen bee, the mother of the
colony, and thousands of sexually
developed females called workers,
which normally lay no eggs, but build
the coml >. gather the stores, keep the
hive clean, feed the young, and do
| the Other work of the hivp Durlmr
I nnpl .. e - uurmg
pan or *he year there are also pres
of males, or
j drones, whose only service is to mate
I with young queens. These three
j types are easily recognized, even by
a novice. In nature the colony lives
In a hollow tree or other cavity, but
under manipulation thrives in the arti
proyided. The combs
which form their abode are composed
of wax secreted by the workers The
hexagonal cells of the two vertical
I layers constituting each comb have
! interplaced ends
un
ent some hundreds
tlclal hives
on a common sep
>/
W
A
The Honey Bee: a. Worker; b. Queen;
c. Drone.
'f
In the cells of these combs
turn.
are reared the developing bees, and
honey and pollen for food
stored here.
are also
The cells built naturally are not
all of the same size, those used in
rearing worker bees being about one
fifth of an inch across, and those used
In rearing drones and
honey, about one-fourth of an inch
across.
in storing
The upper cell In natural
combs are more Irregular, and
»rally curve upward
end.
gen
at the outer
They are used chiefly for the
storage of honey. Under manipula
COTS OR INDIVIDUAL HOUSES
m . s
Whether the large house with Indi
vidual pens is better than the Indi
vidual cot la an open question, perhaps
largely a matter of Individual perler
ence. Each has Its distinct advan
tages which cannot be secured in the
other. Many of the best hog raisers
are now providing themselves with
both types of bouses, and this seems
to be the most satisfactory method It
Is no more expensive In the long run.
for all the buildings can be kept in
use the year around. In such cases
Making Use of Garden Waite.
During the summer there Is a
great deal of waste In the garden that
may be made good use of when fed
to the hens. Hens will eat almost all
kinds of green food, vegetables and
fruljt.
When the peas have been picked
from the vines It hardly pays to burn
the vines as so much rubbish when
hens are especially fond of them
The same thing may be said of
beans, beet tops, cabbage, etc. Every
suburban home should have a flock
of hens; It Is surprising how little It
costs to keep a small flock of hens
when the waste of the garden and
kitchen Is fed them.
Individuals vs. Breed.
In the selection of hogs for breed
ing animals, more attention should be
paid to the individual qualities of
boar and sow than to the particular
breed. Breed alone does not deter
mine good breeding stock. A pure
bred boar Is to be preferred and both
boar and 80 w "bould be rather of a
■ Dedl ' lm *ban an extreme type of the
___jUiad.gmr—uted. -
tion the size of the cells is controlled
by the bee keeper by the use of a
comb foundation—sheets of pure bees
wax on which are impressed the bases
of cells and on which the bees build
the side walls.
When the activity of the spring
begins, tlje normal colony consists of
the queen and some thousand of work
ers. As the outside temperature
raises, the queen begins to lay eggs
in the worker cells.
These in time develop into white
larvae, which grow to fill the cells.
They are capped over and transform
4
»
Comb Architecture: a. Vertical seo*
lion at top of comb; b, vertical sec
tion showing transition from worker
to drone cells; c, horizontal section
at side of comb showing end bar of
frame; d, horizontal section of work
er brood cells; e, diagram showing
transition ceils.
first into pupae and then into adult
worker bees. As the weather grows
warmer, and the colony increases in
h f Z p e R by ,h'. he „ en,e Hf nC % 0 H f th H y . 0 T
,1 ?
h , . .. or erS f OI \ nUe a°
m n honev P Ina' ?, I a
° whe^ the hlll r |.° r , «Ta
ing. when the hive is nearly filled
, .
with bees and stores, or when a heavy
honey flow Is on. the queen begins
to lay eggs In the larger cells, and
these develop Into drones or males
Continued Increase of the colony
, .. . .. .
would result in the formation of
„ « ,
enormous colonies, and unless some
. . „ . . „ . . .
17" ! , n ° m ea8e ,
dm Hv hnL V I T"
Finally however the workers begin
to build queen cells. These are larger
-, ,, ** .
than any other cells in the hive and
. __ _ _. .. .. t .
hang on the comb vertically. In size
« — j d v,nro Kä _.
and shape they may be likened to
outside" 1 and are alS ° r ° U8h ° n 1118
In preparing for swarming the
queen sometimes lays eggs In partly
constructed queen cells, but when a
colony becomes queenless the cells
are built around the female larvae
The larvae In these cells receive spe
cial food, and when they have grown
to full size then, too, are sealed up,
and the colony Is then ready foi
swarming.
edge
the large houses are used for farrow
ing quarters and as soon as the pigs
are a week or two old. or as soon us
the weather permits, the sows and lit
ters are removed to the Individual
cotB. During the remainder ot the
year the large bouses are utilized tor
sleeping quarters.
I
Oil Meal.
Oil meal will often prevent Indiges
tlon and keep the young sheep cd
Under present conditions farmers
find It most generally profitable to
raise the larger breeds of hogs; the
sows producing more pigs at a lit
ter and growing more rapidly In
weight than the others.
Preventing Weeds Going to 8eed
Weeds should be kept down until
they will not be capable of further
Injury. The main object Is to see that
they do not produce seed, for nature
In her desire to prevent the extinc
tion of any species, endows them with
the power of producing seed »her,
*ery young and small. The morning
glory cockle burr and other weeds will
make seed pods when not over six
Inches high.
OBe-Horse Drag In Corn.
This Is the kind of a Reason when
It will pay to run a one-horse drag In
tbo corn after ordinary laylng-by
time. This will keep the top layer
stirred and will save the
moisture for the corn roots. Crops
have been saved In this way when
the; would bave dried out entirely u
scanty
For Late Summer
jm
H*.
V
A
pi
X
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m
fc;.
•y -y •
à m
;
'
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•<. -V "
V i
><•
v
N>
r.
'V *
*
■ ,
; ' >
' *i •
Æ
j'
V
s
-
-5,
models Outing hats for July and Au
eust are of felt In white or light
' co,ors - 8ucb as Alice blue, champagne
the 88a8 °"' 8 beautlfu pink tones.
! Th88e ar8 «"her all felt or felt and
^ . . .
hemp combinations and are trimmed
' ._ . .. . . .
8of ' draperies of
X" 0 " "i W,Dg8 rlbb ° n h They
? T r
eten * R„t thev "'T ° f ^
>hg clean. But they remain present
nh1a __. . .
ab, 6 f°r some time and are cleaned
_.,, K _, ..
with fine sandpaper. Everywhere the
0oatln 8 whlte veil accompanies these
^°''looklng creations of the milliner.
The ve , |g are of , , n gevera ,
r * 0 *« 00 . . .
netles, in coarse silk nets and in
rm, .. . . , ,
chlfron. They are all washable and
a dd immensely to the attractiveness
.. . .
Zl el ** T C °™ °* ^ **
F
ORESHADOW1NG already what
we may expect for the coming
fall season, the hats for late
summer Indicate that we shall have
many bonnet-like shapes, tail crowns
and large hats few in number as com
pared to small and medium-sized
More pretentious millinery is shown
AFTERNOON DRESS.
> \ B
i
p
I
M
Ï
Peacock blue Irish poplin is chosen
for our model. The plain skirt has
a row of satin-covered buttons sewn
part way up the seam at right side of
front
The bodice has a yoke of white
tucked nlnon over peacock blue; a
braided or fancy silk waistcoat sur
rounds the yoke. The sides are of
material; they are carried down over
th top of sleeves, which have fancy
cuffs edged with nlnon frills.
A Curious Fashion.
The latest models In skirts or In
costumes, with attached skirts and
waists show the skirt decidedly short
er In front than at the hack, a differ
ence which. In the walking length. Is
very noticeable. Even ballroom gowns
are cut on the same lines.
Is
an
wheD all the crudeness of spring has
usually been eliminated from Its gar
ments Is a puzzle, but here It Is. nev
erthelese, and many frocks that would
otherwise have been graceful have
been marred by It
"Shows the embroidery on the front
of her socks and hides the darns in
the heels." said a male critic of one
of these gowns, and his cruel remark
accurately describes the style
Why such an untidy fashion should
have come from Paris at
season
It
New Veil.
You can keep a new veil from
stretching by threading tbe sewing
machine with silk of the same color
and stitching carefully along each
The win
In the trimmed models pictured here.
One of the cone-shaped hats, of
which we may expect to see numbers
during the fall Beason, Is shown In
the Illustration. It Is trimmed with
a full ruche of silk "pinked" at the
edges and laid In quadruple box-plait
lngs. Velvet fruit, like plums, cher
ries or even apricots, set In these
ruchlngs make a trimming chic nnd
striking. Velvet fruit, In fact. Is de
veloping so much popularity that it
will probably stay with us and add a
charming note to winter millinery,
and hats made of felt In the shape
pictured here are quite like to be
trimmed In the same way.
A model of black hemp, with a mod
erately tall crown. Is also shown. It
Is calculated to pave the way for ex
tremely high-crowned models, or
crowns trimmed extremely high,
which Paris says, are to be a vogue
for winter. This soft-crowned model
makes use of the feather band about
the brim edge and Is finished with a
cluster of upstanding plumes at the
back. An ornament made of plaited
ribbon finishes the trim, poised on the
crown at the right side.
Hat of peacock blue straw with s
puffed crown of nlnon to match, and
trimmed below by a wreath of pale
pink roses.
Materials required: 4% yards pop
lin 42 Inches wide, ^4 yard tucked
nlnon, % yard silk 20 Inches wide.
TO PREVENT SAGGING SKIRTS
Have Garment Properly prepared Be
fore It it Turned Up to
Be Hemmed.
Summer dress skirts when made ot
thin material will always sag after
they are hemmed and finished If care
Is not taken to prevent It. A good way
to do Is to have the skirt sagged first
before It Is turned up to be hemmed.
This Is done after the skirt Is
pletely finished excepting the hem,
from the band to the final fitting and
the last hook and eye Is In Its place.
The skirt Is now hung In a closet or,
better rtill put upon a full-length
dress form raised from the floor by
placing It on a box, and the bias
tlons of the gores weighted
will stretch to the fullest extent.
After several days of this strain the
material will have sagged to Its full
est extent, and the hem may be
ured and turned up. Anything will
do for weighing. The smallest weights
from the kitchen scales, put In tem
porary coverings of mnslln and pin
ned on, are excellent. Any other small
objects of uniform heaviness will
for other weights.
ci m
por
they
meas
do
Sashes.
One of the greatest aids In varying
the white summer gowns Is the
of the sash, which Is the
much as ever.
The velvet sash of the winter Is
superseded by the pastel
UEC
style ns
colored
moires and the lighter chiffon ruches,
black In color, as an edging. thlB fin
ished with black chenille fringe and
flowers of the same at the cads,
being decorated with wreaths of gold
roses at the ends In piace of the other
decoration
Borne
These are some of the newer fan
cies that seem at once to become
pop
ular, as they are shown In some of the
most exclusive shops.
Accessories Important.
Fashionable gowns of the
ful description depend almost entirely
upon little accessories In the way of
collars, cuffs, vests and undersleeves
for their success.
more use
Without such orna
mental addition the average serge
cloth gown of the moment becomes a
curiously severe looking affair, dis
tinctly lacking In attractiveness. It
Is Just these charming oddments
which make such heavy raids
one's "pin money," and the woman
who Is able to reproduce expensive et
eeleras In her own sitting room has
an enormous advantage over her lees
skillful sister.
or
upon
Apron Pockets.
Sew the pocket of your apron on
the Inside, a little In from the right
hand edge. Nothing will drop from
It then, It will stay clean and a great
deal can be carried In It without
showing any ugly fullneat.
PHILOSOFHY TO THE RESCUE
Pat Went Without Hi* Steak, but at
That Everything Wat Not
Lott.
Charles Nagel, secretary of com
merce and labor, says the Irish race
has, In addition to Its sentiment and
romance, lot of philosophy as one
of Its characteristics.
''The best Illustration I ever heard
of this," he explained to a dinner
party one evening, "was the case of
a poor irishman who had been given
a fine, juicy piece of steak. Being a
religious man, be placed the steak in
front of him, and there, in the shade
of the trees surrounding his benefac
tor's house, he folded hiB hands,
closed his eyes, and gave thanks to
heaven for the meal. When he was
in the attitude of prayer a dog rushed
up and captured the steak,
looked around In time to see the food
disappearing oyer the hill.
" 'Thank heaven,',' he exclaimed,
again closing his eyes, 'he left me my
appetite!'"—The Sunday Magazine.
Pat
SURE.
m
w
-V
Man In the Big Hat—I've always
made money out of politics.
Man in Small Hat—Are you a po
litical orator?
Man ln Big Hat—No; I'm the leader 1
of a brass band. The musicians al
ways get paid, but the orators are ex
pected to talk for nothing.
Reaton Enough.
"What's the matter, old man?"
asked the sympathetic friend.
"Well," answered the judge, "you
see, my wife and I have never been ,
able to get along very well. The re
lattonshlp has become so unbearable ,
that we bolh want a divorce."
"I see," answered the friend. "Then
why don't you get one?" !
"Because," answered the Judge, sad
ly, "I have sent all the bogus divorce
lawyers to the penitentiary."
A Mystery.
He (during the spat)—Well, If you
want to know It, I married you for
your money.
She—I wish
could tell as easily
what I married you for.—Boston
Transcript.
Urn. Wtm*iow*e Soothing aymp for Children
teething. Hoftenn the guoiH, n-ducen Inflamma
tion. a I lav m pain, euren wind colic, 26c a bottle.
The hero is he who is immovably
centered.—Emerson.
BETTER FOR MEN, WOMEN AND CHILDREN THAN CASTOR OH,
SALTS.OR FILLS, AS IT SWEETENS AND CLEANSES THE SYSTEM MORE EFFICIENTLY AMS
IS FAR MORE FLEASANT TO TAKE.
^YiaJP°friGS'^LL\IlHÄNNA
IS THE IDEAL FAMILY LAXATIVE, AS
IT GIVES SATISFACTION TO ALL, IS
ALWAYS BENEFICIAL IN ITS EFFECTS
AND PERFECTLY SAFE AT ALL TIMES.
CALIFORNIA FIG SYRUP CO.
in. tlie Circle.
on everiÿ Package of tne Genuine.
J
*
\
I
\
ALL RELIABLE DRUGGISTS SELL THE ORIGINAL AND
GENUINE WHEN CAIXED FOR, ALTHOUGH THEY COULD
MAKE A LARGER PROFIT BY SELLING INFERIOR PREPARA.
TION5, YET THEY PREFER TO SELL THE GENUINE, BECAUSE
IT IS RIGHT TO DO SO AND FOR THE GOOD OF THEIR
CUSTOMER!
DRUGGISTS ARE THE ONES TO DEAL WITH, AS YOUR
LIFE OR HEALTH MAY AT SOME TIME DEPEND UPON
THOR SKILL AND RELIABILITY
fii
ÿ&ENl
WHEN IN NEED OF MEDICINE! SUCH
I.COIIOL
WHEN BUYING
_MAJBI7Wl COfKrmiKM,
'uMOLÏm* ''IMIV
Note (fie Fuff Name of tile Gompaniy
snm3äsBQ»-4
MmmTfic'sriiurd
FRINTED STRAIGHT ACROSS,NEAR THE BOTTOM. AND IN
THE CIRCLE,NEAR THE TOP OF EVERY PACKAGE,OF THE
GENUINE. ONE SIZE ONLY. FOR SALE BY ALL LEADING
DRUGGISTS.
•UN1A1UUE rilTUAK
Of PACKAGE
SYRUP OF FIGS AND ELIXIR OF SENNA IS THE ONLY PERFECT FAMILY LAXATIVE,
BECAUSE IT IS THE ONE REMEDY WHICH ACTS IN A NATURAL, STRENGTHENING WAT
AND CLEANSES THE SYSTEM. WITHOUT UNPLEASANT AFTER-EFFECTS AND WITHOUT
IRRITATING, DEBILITATING OR CRIPINC, AND THEREFORE DOCS NOT INTERFERE IN ANY
WAY WITH BUSINESS OR PLEASURE. IT IS RECOMMENDED BY SUIDONS OF MU,
INFORMED FAMILIES, WHO KNOW OF ITS VALUE FROM PERSONAL USE. TO GET IT*
BENEFICIAL E F FECT S ALWAYS BUY THE GENUINE; MANUFACTURED BY THE
REGULAR PRICE SOc PER BOTTLE,
CALIFORNIA FIG SYRUP CO.
PINK EYE
FOR
DISTEMPER
CATARRHAL FEVE»
AND ALL NOSE
AND THROAT DISEASES
(fee#*
Cur.« tbe «kin and acta
. „ , , , » preventive for utber«. I Iquld given .a
tae tongue. Rate for brood mare, and all others. Best klduev remedr 60
cenu .und «l.«l a bottle ; If, M) and 110.00 the deren. Bold by all dmuriita
and hor,.e good. t«u«., or .rut expre«« puld, by the manufacturera
SPOHN MEDICAL CO.,
Chemists, GOSHEN, INDIANA
W. L. DOUGLAS
•2.50, *3.00, *3.50 4 *4.(10 SHOES Â
WOMEN wear W.L.Dougl«s stylish, perfect
fitting, easy walking boots, because they give
long wear, same as W.L. Douglas Men's shoes.
Eg
THE STANDARD OF QUALITY
FOR OVER 30 YEARS
■if
The workmanship which has madeW.L.
Douglas shoes famous the world
maintained in every pair.
If I could lake you into my large factories
at Brockton. Mass., and show you how
carefully W .L.Douglas shoes are made,
would then understand why they are war
ranted to hold their shape. Et better andi
wear longer than any other make for the price
CÄÜTI0M Th6 S<ngln«J>g M j^ t j t>- p fla ^^
V)
JF
5k
over is
if
W
you
THAT
AWFlll
BACKACHE
Cured by Lydia E. Pinknam's
Vegetable Compound
Morton's Gap, Kentucky.—"I suf
fere d two years wi th female disorders.
my health was very
...,.bad and I had a
^continuai backache
[ï which was simply
gjawful. I could not
stand on my feet
long enough to cook
Sÿ-: : ia meal's victuals
without my back
nearly killing
and I would
such dragging sen
satlons I could
__ hardly bear It. I
naa soreness In each side, could not
stand tight clothing, and was irregular.
I was completely run down. On ad
vice I took Lydia E. Pinkham's Vege
table Compound and Liver Pills and
id health. It is now
years and I have not
•:
M
mo.
have
I
am
more tuan two :
had an ache or pain since I do all my
own work, washing and everything,
and never have the backache any more.
1 think your medicine is grand and I
praise It to all my neighbors. If you
think my testimony will help others
you may publish It."—Mrs. Oixib
Woodall, Morton's Gap, Kentucky.
Backache Is a symptom of organlo
weakness or derangement. If you
have backache don't neglect It. To
et permanent relielf you must reach
he root of the trouble. Nothing we
know of will do this so surely as Lydia
E. Pinkham's Compound.
Write to Mrs. Pink ham, at
Lynn, Mass., for special advice.
Tour letter will be absolutely
confidential, and the advice free.
Make the Liver
Do its Duty
Nine times in ten when the liver la
right the stomach and bowels are right.
CARTER'S LITTLE
LIVER PILLS
gently but firmly col
pel a lazy liver to
do its duty. A
Cures Con
atipation, In
digestion, A
Sick Kt
He «Jache,
nd Distress After Eating.
SMALL PILL, SMALL DOSE. SMALL PRICE,
Genuine must bear Signature
CARTERS
• 1TTLE
IlVER
[pills.
Thompson's
Eye Water
Sin. old rall.lt..
HOWARD E. BURTON AS ^t,1
8 peel mm prire« Gold. Silver, Lead, $1: Gold,
S'.lvci, 76c Gold, 60c; Zlne or Copper, «I Mailing
envelopes and full price Hat «ent on application.
Control and umpire work solicited. Lead vIlls.
•Jo* Reference. Carbonate National Bank.
AND
•T
W. N. U., Salt Lake City, No. 33-1911.

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