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Montpelier examiner. [volume] (Montpelier, Idaho) 1895-1937, December 31, 1915, Image 1

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MONTPELIER EXAMINER.
MONTPELIER, IDAHO, FRIDAY DECEHBER 31. 1913
Ml. 41
VOL XXI.
FRENCH Will ENTER
CONGRESSIONAL RAGE
*
A
It is Reported That Burto^L Will Try to Re
gain His Seat in the Lower House-Kansas
Editor Says "Borah is the Man.
H
Burton L. French, of Moscow, ex
congressman from Idaho, will be a
candidate for the lower house of
congreps, subject to the will of the
republican primaries in this state in
1916. This announcement is made
says the Capital News, on excellent
advices frorç the close political ad
visers and friends of the "gentleman
from Moscow,
formal announcement will be forth
coming at the proper time. The en
trance of Mr. French into the politi
cal spotlight on north Idaho where
already there is one announced can
didate for the same position, State
Senator E. E. Elliott of Bonner coun
a
The matter of a
ty.
For months there'hu been not a
little Speculation in political circles
u to what Mr. French's action would
be. His frierds have been urging
him'to run for governor u well u
congressman. At the lut republican
primary election he wu a candidate
for United States senator, having de
cided to enter the upper house of
• congress following long service in
the lower. He wu defeated for sen
ator but he ran second in the race in
which there were four candidates.
For this reason and the fact he led
the ticket when running for congress
man make his friends feel he can be
elected'at the next general election
in the event of his nomination.
The following vote cast in the sen
atorial race of a year ago is pointed
to by French's friends as indicative
of his strength.
First Second
Choice Choice Total
J. H. Brady
B. L. French. 8.687 2285 10,972
J F. Ailshle
F B. Oopding .... 6,801 1788 8,087
16,839 1921 17,260
7,836 1683 9,518
French was first elected to con
gress in 1902. He served in the fifty
eighth, fifty-ninth and sixtieth con
gresses.
in ihe fall of 1908 French wps
defeated for the nomination by
Thomas R. Hamer of St. Anthony,
although tWo-thirds of the delegates
were pledged to support him. It
was his defeat at a stampede conven
tion that brought about the enact
ment of a direct primary law by the
next legislature. The 1908 was the
last state convention that has been
or probably will be held in Idaho. In
the fall of 1910 French was again a
candidate for congress, having been
At the convention held
nominated at the first primary elec
tion.
[e was elected by a hand
liirality and served in the
sixty-second and sixty-thirfl congress
es, retiring to become a candidate
for Ui
some
StAtes senator. Feared
Kduse of his ability to
generally
secure vote«/ Mr. French's entrance
into the congressional race will bring
about g lively cm»» test it is believed.
The result of the recent Lewiston
conference of north Idaho republi
cans has sifted the posable guberna
torial entries from that section down
to three. Lieutenant Governor Her
man H. Taylor of Sand point, Frank
.A. David of Moscow and George
Crum of Lewiston. Although an ef
fort has been made to eliminate the
lieutenant governor, and it is reliab
ly claimed in Boise there has been an
open break with him by Senator John
Hart, the southeastern Idaho leader,
he is kuown to have but recently
stated that he will "run for govern
or or nothing" and that he proposes
to enter the race as the, party 's stan
dard bearer. Every effort is being
- - made to convince George Crum that
ild «iter the race, and, be may
to do ao. It can be said on
the best authority that Charles L.
Heitman will not be a candidate, al
though be baa been repeatedly urged
he
to become one. He aspires to a posi
tion on the supreme betuffi but bas
informed bis friends be will not be a
candidate against the present chief
justice, Isaac N. Sullivan, known to
he a candidate to succeed himself.
The probable candidate from the
north for attorney general will be
Guy Martin, if the influence of Re
publican party leaders hu its effect.
They have approached him and point
ed out his nomination and election i*
more than possible. Mr. Martin hu
not u yet indicated he would make
the race. Ex-State Senator C. H.
Potts, of Coeur d'Alene, hu been
suggested u p possible candidate for
that office but it is known here that
men like Heitman would be open in
their opposition to him because of
the bitterness that developed over
the wet and dry fights in the pan
handle. In the event, therefore that
a northern Idaho man should enter
the race for attorney general, bring
out candidates for governor and con
gressman and secretary of state, the
north would be well represented at
the primaries.
Republicans in Idaho are growing
enthusiastic over the support for
United States Senator W. E. Borah
u a possible candidate for the repub
lican nomination of president. While
they are somewhat disappointed that
San Francisco instead of Chicago, did
not receive the national convention
of the party, they are more than
cheered by the words of W. Y. Mor
gan, lieutenant governor of Kansu,
party leader of that state, a director
of the Associated Press and editor
and owner of the News, Hutchinson,
Kan. Mr. Morgan hu just com
pleted a tour of the eut and he is
out with a statement that if the west
wants to nominate the next republi
can candidate for president, it should
get behind Senator Borah, for the
esst looks to the west for a solution
of the presidential,situation. After
reviewing the prospects of the sev
eral candidates he says in the leading
editorial in his paper:
"One of the ablest and shrewdest
of New York republican leaders said
to me that New York would go
stronger for an outsider than a home
man. I had said I wu for Senator
Borah, although I feared that a wes
tern candidate would have prejudices
to overcome* This leader said:
'Senator Borah would carry New
York by a bigger majority than any
New Yorker could.' Others told me
the'same story without dissent.
"It seem to me that never before
hu there been a better chance to
nominate a candidate from west of
the Mississippi river. I came back
with the firm belief that Senator
Borah is not only able and fit for the
place, which all concede, but in many
respects is the most available. He
stands high in the eut u a man who
meuures up to the job, and his loca
tion is an asset and not a liability
when viewed from the calm stand
point of vote-getting.
"When the west hu the best man
and the eut hu no local favorite
and concedes that a western candi
date would be stronger, I think more
than ever that Kansu ought to give
its support to the best man, the
former Kansan, William Bsrah."
it
a
to
ef
the
an
that
may
on
L.
al
BANK EMPLOYES WERE
GENEROUSLY REMEMBERED
Tim Kinney, president of the First
National bank of this city, and a
member of the board of directors,
remembered Cashier Sullivan and
the other attaches of the bank in a
most generous way on Christmas, as
is evidenced by the following tele
gram which was received by Mr.
Sullivan on Christmas Eve:
Sait Lake, Utah, Dec. 24.
R. A. Sullivan.
Montpelier, Idaho.
Representing the board of di
rectors, I send greeting to yon all
and direct you to present to all em
ployes of the bank, including your
self, five per cent of their last year's
salaries; Mrs. Sullivan to receive the
same as the girls, in consideration of
her pari faithful services.
posi
bas
a
chief
to
the
Tim Kinney.
THE SLEEPLESS NIGHT
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«Copyright.»
ELECTRIC SERVICE
OF HIGH EFFICIENCY
in
It is 4 o'clock of a winter after
noon. You are busy at your work,
and as you lift your eyes and see the
shadows lengthen across the room,
it suddenly dawns on you that twi
light is coming on; that the light
isn't as good as it might be. You
reach out and push the button that
floods the room with electric light,
and you go on with your work in
comfort.
Within five or ten minutes of the
time you turned on the light, prob
ably 40,000 or 60,000 other people
pushed buttons for light in as many
offices and shops. Where does it ail
come from?
You are one among 270,000 peo
ple who live in a territory being sup
plied with electric service by a single
organization.
Try to realize for an instant the
tremendous organization and equip
ment which must be necessary to fill
without a moment's delay any de
mand for electricity in nearly 150
towns, cities and rural communities
scattered through Utah, Idaho and
western Colorado, with 70 hours re
quired to travel by train from the
most northern to the most southern
point of the territory.
The past three years in the inter
mountain west have been fraught
with many achievements, but it is
doubtful if any line of development
work stands out in bolder relief than
the progress made during these years
in southeastern Idaho, northern and
central Utah and western Colorado,
in the utilization of natusal resources
for the generating of electrical ener
gy that in turn has meant an ade
quate, dependable and universal ser
vice throughout a territory where it
was greatly needed.
The Utah Power & Light company,
organized some three years ago and
officered by a number of the most
successful and prominent business
men of the intermountain west, has
successfully perfected a system of
unified hydro-electric transmission
and distribution lines so that it now
serves a 300-mile stretch of territory
in Idaho, Utah and western Colorado,
with an electric service of high effi
ciency and economy.
Aside from the improvements and
extensions made to the distribution
and lighting systems of the cities,
towns and villages in the company's
territory, material extensions have
been made into agricultural terri
tory, providing farmers with many
of the conveniences enjoyed by their
city neighbors. Through these ex
tensions hundreds of new customers
have been supplied with service dur
ing the past year.
Electric range cooking has shown
a big increase and domestic science
departments of varions schools and
colleges in the territory by the com
pany are taking up the subject and
a
a
as
di
all
the
of
instructing students in the art of
"cooking by wire."
Another interesting feature of the
Utah Power & Lignt company's work
in educating the public in the uses of
electrically operated appliances, is
the operation of an electric wuhing
machine by every seventh residence
customer connected to the company's
lines.
Practically three-fourths of all the
company's customers are using elec
tric irons.
Ninety-six per cent of all the resi
dences within 300 feet of the distri
bution lines of the company are using
electric service and 251 miles of in
terurban electric lines, together with
312 miles of street railway lines, se
cure all their power from the Utah
Power & Light Company
Much new work is contemplated
by the company throughout its en
tire territory during 1916, and large
sums of money will be expended in
improving the company's service to
all classes of customers, under the
policy the Utah Power & Light com
pany is pursuing of sparing no ex
pense or pains necessary to bring its
electric service to the highest possi
ble plane of efficiency and economy.
and
PNEUMONIA CLAIMS MRS.
ALICE MACKEN AS A VICTIM
At the home of her daughter, Mrs.
Daniel Hurley, laet Monday after
noon at 2:29 o'clock Mrs. Alice Mack
en, one of the pioneers of Idaho,
peacefully passed to that sleep from
which there U no awakening Mrs.
Maoken's death came as a surprise to
*11, even to her children, allot whom,
except one son, had been constant at
tendants at her bedside after she was
taken 111 on Wednesday evening of
last week. Hlie had had an attack of
the grippe, but thought she was prac
tically recovered from It and Wed
nesday went about her work as usual
That evening she was taken sudden
ly ill and the phyeician who was
summoned announced that she was
suffering from pleuro-pneumonia.
She rallied from the doctor's treat
ment and on Bunday evening she
talked freely »with members of her
family, who felt that the danger
point in her illness had been passed
However, on Monday morning she
showed signs of weakness and about
noon she lapsed into a stupor, from
which the doctors were unable to
arouse her. Mhe continued sinking
until the end can.e at the hour above
stated.
Mrs. Macken was born in the city
of Limerick, Ireland, June 18, 1852.
Mhe «uime to the United Ht»tes when
a young girl and located in Michigan.
It was there she met and married
Daniel Ryan. In the early 80's they
came to Idaho, Mr. Ryan being en
gaged in construction work on the
Oregon Hhort Line railroad which
was then being built through this
state. They remained in Montpelier
for several years and then went to
Huntington. Oregon. Wtiile resid
ing there Mr Ryan met his dealt» in
Baker City, leaving the deceased
with six children depending solely
upon her for their support.
A few years later Mrs. Ryan mar
ried Mr. John Macken, and the
(amity returned to Montpelier, wnere
she and her children have since re
sided,
Deceased Is survived by Mr. Mack
en and six children—William J.,
John M , Dan C. and James P. and
Mesdames D. J. Hurley and C. B
Gove,
Her funeral services were held
from the Catholic church yesterday
mami"weîl ellnMiS^d to"" heiV^Ml
restiug place (a tbs city ernst* ry.
of
to
al
to
a
of
the
of
is
the
in
se
en
in
to
the
ex
its
AUTOMOBILISTS WHY
TAKE A CHANCE?
The following appeal for co-opera
tion and warning to automobilista of
the hasard involved in crowing rail
road tracks without exercising a
necessary degree of care for their
own protection was written by T.
W. Rickard, an O. S. L. conductor
and Safety First Committeeman on
the Idaho division of the Short Line:
"Let it not be overlooked that the
numlser of highway crowing acci
denta has increased in the past year,
due to careless driving of automo
biles while on railroad property, and
especially on highways crowing rail
road tracks, and no one recognizes
the situation more keenly than the
average railroad manager, but he
knows that it is impossible for him
to eliminate such accidents without
the co-operation of the public in
general.
"The engineer pulling the train is
the direct representative of the rail
road in approaching highway croak
ings, and the chauffeur driving the
automobile approaching the railroad
crowing on highways is the direct
representative of the public. Now
will these two important gentlemen
holding such responsible positions
join hands for Safety First and pro
mote it all they can? The railroad
officials can plan and map out all the
safety ideas in the world, but the is
sue is really up to the engineer and
the driver of the automobile to elimi
nate accidents on highway crowing*.
About all an engineer can do ap
proaching a highway crowing is to
keep a close watch, ring the bell and
blow the whistle in accordance wi ih
the rules set up by the railroad com
pany. In order to maintain proper
train schedules the engineer must
awume that the automobile driver
will either stop or else make railroad
crossing in plenty of time to avoid
any hazard of accident.
"At this time, all over the coun
try, railroads are being asked to
abolish grade crossings or establish
warning signals and many other de
vices to protect the public. This re
quirement is due, in a targe degree,
to the many recent accidents to au
tomobi'es at grade crossings. This,
to the [ ublic's lack of knowledge of
the esua-, in a great many Instances,
seems to justify asking immediate
action on the part of the railroads
to protect the drivers of machines.
Should not the driven also be com
pelled to protect their own lives and
those interested in their care? Sta
tistics show that the majority of
these accidents are due to the care
lessness and thoughtlessness of the
automobile driver. Should not an
automobile driver take the same pre
caution that street can do before
to
at
was
of
of
was
was
she
her
she
to
at
city
1852.
they
en
the
this
to
in
mar
the
re
J.,
and
B
held
I - How ; on y* public stand
for the chances being taken by auto- j
mobile drivers when their lives are >
crossing over railroad tracks—Stop
Look and Listen?
RUIIDINGS ERECTED THIS
YEAR COST $122,000
Two Handsome New Business Blocks and Many
Substantial New Hbmes is the Year's Rec
ord for Montpelier*
nal
the
ing
Mr.
ed
ing
Montpelier hu long laid claim to
being one of the very beet towns in
Southeutern Idaho, and with each
succeeding year this claim isstrength
ened by the steady but substantial
improvements made, by the growth
of its two banks, which, by the way,
are recognised u two of the moat
•olid banking houses within the state,
and by the high standing of its mer
cantile institutions with the whole
sale and jobbing houses. While
Montpelier cannot boast of being the
home of any millionaires or those
who might be termed extremely
wealthy, yet u a whole we believe
the citisens of Montpelier are in bet
ter financial circumstances than thoee
of any other city of Its sis* in the
state.
During the year which will close
tonight there hu probably been more
activity In the building line, than In
any previous year in the city's his
tory. That the amount expended in
the erection of business blocks and
residences this year reached a total
of $112,000 may surprise thou who
have not paid clou attention to what
wu going on. This amount, of
couru, includes the $18,000 for the
new Lincoln school building. And
to this may be added the Pacific
Fruit Express Co.'s new ice houses,
which will raise the total to $122.000.
While we have not made a person
al canvass of the town to ascertain
the exact number of new residences
erected this year, we know of at
leut 18, the coot o f which hu
ranged from $1,000 to $5,000.
In the business district the must
important Improvement was the
erection of the handsome addition
to the Hotel Burgoyne. When com
pleted, this alone will represent an
outlay of at taut $80,000. Next to
the bank of Montpelier, It is the
most substantial block in the city,
and it will stand for many years u
a monument to J. N. Downing, a
man who hu made his money In
Montpelier and hu spent it here.
Besides erecting the addition to the
ate
ed
of
as
in
in
of
ity
for
but
of
an
on
at stake? Leas than one minute's
time will be loot In Mopping at rail
road crossings to
clear before crossing the track.
"Owners of automobiles as a rule
are among our best and most highly
respected dtixens, and they will not
hesitate to get back of any reaeon
able movement to protect the life
and limbe of themselves and their
friends.
"People, just at the present time,
cannot seem to picture themselves
lying dead or injured through care
less driving, s o they continue to
dodge death by a hair, to skip out of
the way just in time with their ma
chine crossing over railroad tracks.
As a result there comes a day when
the skip is not in time, all due to
taking a chance. Why Take the
Chance?
"Few people seem to be on the job
It's the
same old story. They walk the tracks
and cross them in a sort of trance
apparently expecting the engineer
to stop the train. The result ta gen
erally death. The only solution is:
Watch out for yourself and in doing
so you will save others. Many times
in one's life you have noticed that
that the way is
ing
son
j Theodore Roosevelt, which re
> suited la a verdict for the defendant.
of
to preserve their own life.
a person on to serious accidents. So
don't take the chance. Tie a good
warning this—avoid depending upon
the man who does not stop, look aad
listen before crowing a railroad
track with an automobile."
New York, Dec. 29.—Counsel for
William Barnes announced today
that an appeal will be taken to the
appellate division of the supreme
court in the suit for libel brought
by Mr. Barnes against former P resL
hot*), Mr. Downing hu expended at
tattat 96,000 Converting the old origi
nal hotel into a modern apartment
house.
The Leverich block, which adjoine
the hotel, la another aptandid build
ing which vastly improves the ap
pearance of Main street, and repre
sents an outlay of about $14.000 by
Mr. Leverich.
Cruikahank 4 Nelson have expend
ed about $15,000 in enlarging their
garage and installing a steam heat
ing plant.
In the new Lincoln school building,
Montpelier hu a temple of learning
upon which every citisen can look
with pride. It Is modern in every
particular, and is an ornament to 'he
city.
The annex to Mass Lewis' block,
ate cost of $1,000or more, hu add
ed to the appearance of that portion
of Main street.
The Gem State Lumber Co's new
lumber office and sheds represent an
outlay of at least $8,000.
Then there is the new $800 "shoe
hospital" erected by Carl Fredericks.
While It Is not large, it ts a palace
as compared to the old shop in which
Carl had been "pegging away" for
several years.
Of the 18 or 20 new reeideneee
erected, moat of them ere of the
bungalow type and ail are modern
in deeign.
Of the $112,000 or more expended
in the erection of burinees blofeks end
residences, but e very small per eeat
of it représenta borrowed money.
This is further evidence of the stabil
ity of Montpelier from a financial
standpoint.
What the new year has in store
for Montpelier, we are unable to my.
but there is every r eason to believe
that at least another score of
homeo will be erected. In the way
of public buildings, we hope to
an elegant new city hall erected up
on the aits now occupied by the old
•hack on upper Main street.
MASONS FITTINGLY
OBSERVE ST. JOHN'S DAY
The members of (be Matonic fra
ternity lu this elty observed Bt
John's Day, last Sunday, by attend
ing divine services In a body at Hi
Andrew's Episcopal church Tbs
•srvieeoand sermon by Ke*. John
son were appropriate for the oooostan.
Returning to the lodge at the close of
services the following officers wore
Installed for the ensuing year; *
W M - Richard Onto.
8. W.— Russell Qroo,
J. W. -R M Reese.
Treasurer—P. O. Heneen.
Heeretary—L. W. Hastings.
M D.-r. M. Johaaea.
J. D. -C. U Wilkins.
Mi-wards (, 'bas. Bager aad H. B.
Whitman.
.Tylsr -Ueorge Moans.
On Monday sveotag the_
ball was given In the pavilion, which
wae alte tided by abont 189 coupiee.
preprint* sud artistic. In the
thsr* was su.p*nd*d a Largo
and com pana and tatter U.
of Um» hall wae also fitted up aa a
corner. In the center ef the
easy
hall
a large evergreen wae statiouod
nod iron it various eolorod lights
glittered, (from the top of the ever
green to many pointa In the bail,
there ware stringer* of Mas aad whits
pea nan t*.
The punch bowl wne stationed la
the southeast corner of the hall.
From it delicious fruit punch was
served during the evening by Cbaa
Hager ead W E Hiehards.
Dancing began shortly after 9
o'clock and from that time until the
last strains of the "Home, Mwcct
Boom" waits died away at 4 a. m.
the merry throng simply
grand, glorioue time. From
standpoint the ball was pronounced
that has «wer
banquet was served uadar the
direction of Mr and Mrs. Mad B e l les .
The
and at midnight a grand rush
made for the banquet rases, but as
only U0 cm Id be seate d at tits first
UMH,w
waa >»»••!« The
turkey, me»bed gc nat ese. be* gravey,
■ oetary, ptakWmwjfc, toe
cream, rak* aad oofiv*. The sarvtea
» as good as owe
ÄtN'wWti ■T»-.! fib t A 041#
at tbs pavilion.
- h r.lt

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