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Montpelier examiner. [volume] (Montpelier, Idaho) 1895-1937, October 12, 1917, Image 1

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MONTPELIER EXAMINER.
HO. SO
MONTPELIER, IDAHO. FRIDAY. OCT. 12 1917
vol. xxni
NEW REVENUE LAW
CATCHES EVERYBODY
Under Its Provisions Practically Every Person in
the United States Becomes a Federal Tax
Payer-Gets You Coming and Going*
Below we publish a brief synopsis
of the new war revenue bill, as pre
pared by Basil M. Manly, special
Washington correspondent for the
Boise Capital News:
With the passage of the war rev
enue bill every American man, wo
man and child, becomes « federal
tax payer.
You cannot buy any article that
has been freighted by rail or water,
you cannot ride on a train, send a
telegram, visit a theatre or ball park,
buy a bottle of patent medicine, a
baseball bat or any other kind of
sporting goods, a tube of tooth paste
or any other toilet article, own an
automobile, a motorcycle or a motor
boat, draw a time draft, buy a bond
or share of stock, or send in a proxy
for an election, without paying trib
ute to your Uncle Samuel.
Moreover, through the Income and
excess profits taxes, not leses than
6,000,000 Americans, who have nev
er known what it is to take money
out of their pockets and pay it over
directly to Uncle Sam's collectors
•will now have to learn to make out
their tax returns and master all the
intricacies of calculating gross and
net income, capital invested, depre
ciation and exemptions.
The income tax now reaches
* down and takes its levy from every
married man or woman with an in
come over $2,000, and every un
married man or woman with an In
come over $1,000, and the war prof
its tax reaches every corporation
*" with a net income over $3,000 and
every partnership and Individual op
erating a business which yields more
than $6,000 net income during this
and
on
is
tax
the
by
in
on
15
of
year.
Everyone of these five million new
tax payers ought to learn as soon a -i
possible how to figure their taxes ou
that they can now plan for the re
adjustments in their business and
personal affairs which these
tlvely heavy federal taxes will neces
sitate.
In order to enable them to make
these calculations without calling in
a laywer or wading through the in
tricacies of the 130-page
bill, the following simple analysis of
the war profits and incarne taxes lias
r.da
revenu«
DECLARES MORMONS ARE
LOYAL TO UNITED STATES
Last Sunday morning at the con
ference of the L. D. S. church in Salt
Lake, Apostle George Albert Smith
took particular pains to call to the
attention of his audience the attitude
of the organization as a church
toward the government of the United
States, so far as Its participation in
the war is concerned, when he said
that every member, of the church in
good standing sustained the nation
and the government at this and ai»
times. He said in part:
j
"In the midst of the great world i
that exists today, while there !
m
war
are transgressors of the law of the
land, while there are transgressors
of the laws of God, It Is a Joy and a
satisfaction to me to know In my aoul
that while there are those that are
opposing this free government, there
are not any of those belonging to this
church in good standing but what are
sustaining the laws of the
There is one church that is
j
United
States.
given to understand that this gov
ernment is God-given, that this gov
ernment has been raised by the Al
mighty. There is one church which
will not tear down the constituted
authorities with reference to going
forth Into the war. Wby? Because we
have been taught by inspired men
and by the word of the Lord, and all
Israel to a man has come forth and
has said, 'If I am needed, here am I.*
God help ub to sustain the govern
ment that has been so good for us.
ajad ha* made it possible for the es
tablishment of this work,
sustain good men and great men ev
are told to do in
Let us
erywhere, as we
these revelations given in these last
days, and by and by It will be said
that this world Is better for our hav
ing lived in It."
A"
been prepared with the assistance of
Washington's leading tax experts:
The Income Tax
WHO MUST PAY? Every unmar
ried man, woman or child with a net
income from wages, profits, interest,
rent or any other source exceeding
$1,000 for the calendar year 1017,
and every married person with a net
income exceeding $2,000.
Returns must be made under oath
on or before March 1, 1918, by every
person with an income exceeding the
amounts named above, even if there
is no tax due under the penalty of
$20 to $1000 for failure.
HOW TO CALCULATE NET IN
COME. Net income, upon which the
tax is levied, is calculated by taking 1
the total amount of money received I
by the individual during the year
from all sources and deducting from
that amount the following items:
Necessary expenses actually paid
in carrying on any business or trade,
but not including personal, living or
family expenses:
«All interest paid within the year
on indebtedness, except interest on
loans made for the purchase of tax j
exempt securities; .
AH taxes local, state and federal. 1
except income and war profits taxes;
Losses actually sustained during
the year in business or trade or from
fires, storm, theft etc.;
Debts ascertained to be worthless
and actually charged off;
Reasonable allowance
it
for
wear
and tear of property employ'd in bus
iness;
Contributions for religious, charit-|50.
able, scientific or educational pur
poses to an amount not in excess of | ble
15 percent of the net income with
out the benefit of this paragraph.
EXEMPTIONS.
yet
Unmarried per
sons have $1,000 exempt from
come tax; married persons have $2,
exempt and in addition $200 exempt
for each dependent child under 18
years of age,
TAX RATES.
in
The taxes levied
upon Incomes are a composite result
of four separate setB of taxes, the
"normal" tax rates in the old reve
nue bill and the new, and the "super
tax" rates In the old bill and the new.
For example, under the old law tlterk
was a normal tax of 2 per cent on all
incomes of unmarried persons over
$3,000, the new bill adds a new nor
mal tax of 2 per cent and lowers the
exemption to $1,000; under the old
bill supertaxes started with $20,000,
and these supertaxes will stand, but
there have been added new super
taxes beginning with $5,000.
result is very confusing.
In order to bring all the existing
rates Into simple form, I hate com
bined them in a single tabla which
j
)
J
!
j
i
The
(Continued on laat page)
MONTPELIER POHTOFFK'E IS
NOW ACCOUNTING OFFICE
The postoffice department recently
made an order establishing what are
termed district and central account
ing postoffices. A central postoffice
i& named for qpch county, and from
this office all of the other postoffices
In the county will hereafter obtain *
their supplies, such as stamps, stamp
ed envelopes, postal cards, paper
wrappers, etc.
The Montpelier postoffice has been ; ,
designated as the central accounting
j office for Bear Lake county and will
i keep on hand supplies for the other ,
! post offices in this county. This will
enable the postmasters in the smallei
towns to get their supplies on short,
notice.
a
is
It also means a great deal
of extra work for postmaster Robison
as he will be required to
make
a j
quarterly report of the supplies fur
nished to each office in the county
j to the Bistrict accounting office.
all
I.*
us.
es
ev
in
ARE NO FLAW« IN
LIBERTY'S CAUSE
Here are some of the new Liberty;
bond slogans:
"Put up your money and put down
the Kaiser."
"Subscribe to the Liberty loan and
hear the Kaiser groan."
"Liberty bonds afloat—we'll ge»,
the Kaiser's goat."
"World's on fire; Kaiser's a ltar;
be a bond buyer."
"If you can't go across—come
across."
"Buy a Liberty bond today and
drive oppression away."
"Float the bends and sink the U
us
boats."
"Millions for democracy, not one
.
cent for autocracy. 1
1
A Real Curiosity at the Fair
■Jftett'to«*
'W ne«
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ï I iifty/aiS
«w? IL
usrmT v*i *•>*■
>fhV
foT
it
j;i I«*»« *»' Ips-T-VS» VOX*
liyarfllBen
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I
,u
ft ill
A'
St.
He
11,
in
The
all
days
all
1
I
Third grade, 25; Fourth grade, 33;
j fifth grade, 22; Sixth grade, 33;
. t .| 178
1
ENROLLMENT IN PUBLIC
HCHOOIiH IS NOW 6MU
The enrollment since the begin
ning of school has been gradually
increasing in all of th' departments,
it stands at the present time as fol
lows:
Washington Building
First grade, 33; Second grade. 32;
Lincoln Building
First grase, 71; Second grade, 37;
Third grade, 43; Fourth grade. 48;
Fifth grade, 36; Sixth grade, 34;
total, 264.
ea.
la
two
St.
| ble sessions in the First grade of the
High School Building
Junior High, 138; Senior High,
They are still forced to hold dou
last
The
of
Lincoln building as the furniture and
fixtures ordered long ago have not
yet arrived for the other room.
The congestion at the Washington
building was relieved last week when
another room was fitted up for the
Sixth grade. Mrs. Seifert, a former
teacher, substituted in that room
last week. The regular teacher. Miss
Grace Gillard, arrived Sunday from
Iowa and assumed her duties Mon
day.
for
Most of the grades In both of the
buildings. Including the Junior High
have been out on "hikes." This
seems to be a pleasant diversion dur
ing these pleasant autumn days
The children enjoy It and it gives
them a greater Interest in their
work. The faculty have also taken
advantage of the fine weather and
have been on two trips. The former
was taken up Montpelier Canyon and
the latter around Bear Lake.
Thee hildren are making excellent
use of the playground apparatus at
j the two buildings but some of the
) alder children are somewhat Indis
creet in the use of these things after
J school hours and as a result some
! of the apparatus at the Washington
j building has been damaged,
parents should co-operate with the
teachers and avoid a repetition of
tb's In the future.
The school has arranged an enter
i rain ment in the nature of a program
up
by
be
*
is
for the parents this, Friday, even
; , ng at 8 O . c i oc g i„ t h e hgh school
building. The teachers will act aa a to
reception committee. j
, The schools will close Friday, Oct
20 for one week u the teachers «,*
requ ired to attend the joint Instl
tute w bich will be held in Pocatello
The
during the week beginning October
2 2.
a
a
a j
oREN JENSEN WRITES
FROM AMERICAN LAKE
Oren Jensen, one of the nineteen
who left here last week for the train
ing camp at American Lake, writ«»
to the Examiner under date of Oc
tober 5, as follows:
"Wo arrived here after about 36
hours ride. There were 277 men on
the train wheq. It reached here, and
we were all tired. Letters from our
«y-tends will sure be appreciated, as
we are feeling somewhat blue, but
ge», will probably like It better after
while. There are about 30,000 here
now. Send the Examiner to me at
44 Company."
and
U- at Shreveport, La.. Monday
American Lake, 166 Dept. Brigade,
The hiebest price paid for cotton
seed since the civil war was obtained
when
60 car loads averaging 25 tons to
one the car were sold for $77 per ton to
. the local oil mills.
HANS NIKLHEN, A ST. CHARMCS
PIONEER, CALLED BY HEATH
St. Charles, on Thursday, October 4
He was born In Henmark on August
11, I860, and came to tbla country
in 1864 and located at Hyrum, Utah
The following year he «me to St
Charlea and had resided there ever j
since.
atetan and he was well known by j
all of the old timer«. aa In the early
days he traveled from one end of the
valley to the other playing for dane
In those day« violin music was
all the people had to duncee by.
Mr. Nielsen never married. He*
Hans Nielsen died at hla home In
Mr Nielsen waa a fine mu
ea.
la survived by one brother, Fred and
two staters, Ellen and Margaret, of
St. Charlea. and a sister. Mrs. C. M ;
Pugmlre of Salt Lake.
funeral services wore held
Hla
from the 8t. Charles meeting house
last Monday afternoon at one o clock
The speakers were blehop Keetch and
Edgar M. Allred, both of whom apoke
of the kindly disposition and exem
plary life that the deceased had led.
IDAHO CITIZENS SHOULD i
INVSKT IN LIBERTY RONDS
Boise, Oct. 10.—Idaho must invest
$7.900,000 In liberty bonds. The ex
ecutive committee of the twelfth dt»
trlct haa fixed thla aa the minimum
for the state. The maximum is $13.
supplyn is
In order to have the Gate
for
000.000.
keep up Ita record
funds for war purposes and to cw
up to the expectations of the eve
utlve committee of the twelfth dis
trlct, Idaho must buy bond« to the
amount of $10,000,000.
The government rnuat have $3.
000,000,000 and to get this mini
mum amount Idaho must subscrib •
$7,900,000, but this figure should
by no means be the maximum. Chair
man Davis says that $9,000,000 must
be taken aa the state a minimum and
that the full $10.000.000 that the
western division headquarters expect
should be subscribed.
The government cannot get along
with less than $3,000,000,000 and It
is asking subscriptions up to $5,
000,000.000. In order to meet the
demands of the government It I» Im
perative that Idaho buy bond» up to
the fu, ' *10.000.000 allotment.
"Some people have the Id«« that
to buy a l* bert y bond la to make a
j donation to the government,"
forw " ,r * ov '* rn '» r Jam*!» » Hawl. y
"« the government were taking our
rom»«* In the shape of taxes no loya»
said
citizen would have a right to
We are, however. off«-r«d a
plain.
government bond that pays 4 per cem
interest. Holdings up to $5.000 are
exempt from all taxes. All holding*^
no matter If one haa a million do!«
lars' worth, are exempt from loca^
taxes and a Iso from the normal ln<|
Can you find a better «.$
fer Investment for the man wRli
money. The man who refuses to biiv*
a liberty bond If he has the money
to buy with Is not a g«K»d chi o
Th* question of Investment shouU
a secondary con»lderaM«>n Th« „II
Important thing la that our boy«, th«
sons of mothers and fathers of Idaho,
Their w«l
come tax..
as
have gone to tbe front,
fare demands that our dollars should
at
be handed over to the government
The red-blooded, loyal American v. lII
give unstinted financial support
whether It la for R**d Croaa work, lib
erty bonds or for one of the ««ne,
fonds needed for tbe welfare of the
to
enlisted men."
It la easier for a woman to talk on
any subject than it la for her
to
WHAT YOU CAN DO TO
HELP WIN THIS WAR
Join in the Great Food Saving Campaign Which
Will be Carried on Thruout the U. S. Dur
ing the Week Beginning Oct. 21.
■«vu
•oii
«hut
Iom
Italy
are
Senator E. M. Pugmlre of
Charles, was In the city yesterday.
Mr. Pugmlre 1» chairman for Hear
i.uk* county of tha Untied States
t food administration and la making
arrangements to carry on a campaign
for food conservation In this county
during the week beginning October
21 Similar campaigns will be con- use.
J ducted In every county In the United
States that wfeek.
The object of this campaign Is not
j only to nld the alites but to prevent
tt shortage tn this country of any of
the principal food products, especial
ly wheat, beef, pork, dairy producta,
und sugar. The solution la for Ibe
ppopi« of this country to eat
t H omo and more of other foods of as
^Hi.-n we have an abundance, and In
tQ wn|l , B | ou 0 f M U foods
During the food saving week Ihe but
j poopte will be aaked to have at least
j caUBO Wl , must send more wheat to
,| lt) if w „ aTC lo W |„ this war
American people use an average
()f f|vfl , >oun( t„ of wheat flour per
St.
Ihe
can
of
In
Last
ns
css of
on« wheat loan meal each day, be
lug
!
'.V
a
food
you
will
If the conaump
person per week
tlon should he reduced one pound a
wook that would mean a saving of
many millions of pounds of flour
; | ollB nna with the nllles. and we must
The meat problem la alao a t«r
conserve our meat supply In order
to help them. This can easily be
American people
done without any Inconvenience to
If we will
A
HEAR LAKE WILL PROlb
ABLY HAVE COUNTY AGENT
i h. W. Hoehbaum. bead of the f
county agents In Idaho, met will» the
county commissioners last Tuesday j
f or t | lc p UrpoBO 0 f Interesting them
colll ,ty.
ip i„ n rtld work that has been dona
In employing an agent for Bear Lake
Mr. Hoehbaum told of «he
4f
[nr
by the»« agent« in aeveral count!«»
He stated that a number
() f ( ,tiier counties are lntendl<M I«
fluid
uny
In Idaho.
Mcurfl sgenta for next your and h<
foU thaf f},.«m r I-ake should keep up
w | tl| |, B neighbors In ibis
Hoehbaum assured the commis
w , mlrt go «bout Ihe county looking
w | gI , an< ] giving the farmers Imprac
a practical farmer- on« acquainted
wllh tho ronfm ioiis and needs of ths
matter
slotier» that If they decided to enb
ploy an agent he would not »end
them a "white collared" man who
a
tlcsl suggestions, but would secure
farmers today.
University
arn ut u an t n y
, ' ,î ' no ,n maintaining in
Tho commissioners all expressed
themselvea aa being heartily In favor
of employing a county agent, and It j
Is quite likely that arrangement« will
be made for one in the near future
In
at
be
A county ag'Mit for every county In
Idaho Is now possible, with the en
actment of the Food Production law
recently signed by thee president.
Federal funds are now available for
every county which will co operate
with the United States department of
of
■t
If
I
All know
com--:
a HOME AUTO DRIVERS SHOW
NO REGARD FOR HUMAN LIFE
One of these days the Examiner 1*1
going to be called upon to chronicle
a serious automobile« mash up,
more precaution la not exercised b*
the auto drivers Id going up sn I
down Montpelier canyon,
have traversed tbe canyon rosd
»hat there are numerous places where
j drivers cannot see «neb other until
1-1*1»«/ aim«« together, Tbe » 1 st*
\ls* require* that on such road« drtr
W» are required to c«mt!nual!y honk
their herns. Many not only fall to
(to thla but they drive at a speed of ;
25 to 36 mil«* an hour, which
V
»
lII -fr' 1 **
ac«d >'st vus nmrrcwlv averted abvutjr
?wm n»;t*s up th
the Stoddard was driving up th- any »
when something suddenly wen« wrong
wUta fils engine and he wss compel-.
led to stop in the middle of the road
It was at a paint where cars
proocbtng from either direction could
rnm
nothing abort of criminal carel
f
-''
i.iuu lsüFârdrr a f t «nr m nb a sertoe»'
Willard
'XB/OS
on
to
sp
■«vu hut on* ou no* of mut p*r p»r
•oii p»r day. we con und the allies
«hut they itwd
Our people uiQft also learu
Iom sugar. Before tha war FYance.
Italy and Belgium produced mora
sugar than they used. but today tbay
are producing much lose than tbay
use. while England la cut off fro
as much condensed milk sa we did
In any one year befora tba war. W«
must not only keep up to tbla levât.
but still do better. To do tbla wa
must conserve In the uas of milk and
to tsss
Ihe mum of to per cent of bar
usual supply.
divide with the allied eountrti
can do It by economising.
The decreasing herds and the lack
of feed means s steady falling oft
In the dairy products of tba aille«.
Last year we sent them three time«
We must therefore
I We
ns much butter snd nearly ten tine«
butter.
The small daily servira tn substi
tution can be done by all. Tb« aav
lug In waste by ihe majority and th«
! aronlng of food consumed by all
'.V III help wla the war
Senator Pugmlre Intends to bava
a committee In each ward In tba
county to go among tba paopl« and
secure their co-operation In tba great
food saving campaign daring tba
week above stated Make ap your
mind that you are going to do what
you can to save that weak, and yon
will be surprised at the result.

A HHKHMKB HOG BRING*
THE MEAT MUM OF
f About two weeks a Bloomington
i-snrhsr brought a dressed bog to
j Montpelier, which ba sold to tba Hoff
Meat Co., and received In pay meat
\
$»141.
bwlng ln th« advane«« In th« prie«
4f bogs, lud« y th« rancher would
avo revolved clo«« to $10 for that
[nr the some a cheek for
«am« hog. Flv« years ago If a man
fluid predicted that today aa 1S
monlhi old dressed hog would bring
uny where near $00 he would bava
been declared a fit subject for <M$
Insane asylum. .— -
-—r"
OLD HOLDIEitM' HOME
AT IIOIHK 144 BURNED
Thursday afternoon of last week
a fire at the ftoldlera* Home at Bnlaa
completely destroyed the mala bu i l d
lug and ««at wing Thwre wer« I
old soldiers quartered there at tba
time, but fortunately the fire coaxing
It j them all oui without Injury.
Another fortunate thing llee In »be
In the day time made It «any to get
fact that the government barracks
at fini»» are now occupied by govern
ment troops and the old soldiers can
be cared for there until a new bntld
In
of
Ing chn be erected at tbe Howe
grounds The barracks bave bee n
rec«Hilly put In complete repair and
will provide excellent accommoda
tions •
of
for a distance of skoal
100 yards White Mr. Stoddard waa
■t work on his engine an «mat bound
car came along at a speed of 30 mil
an hour or better There waa ample
room at that point for the car to bava
If iukhhI Mr Stoddard easily at a «1 >w
»peed, but a» tbe driver did not slow
I down or honk hie horn, and Mr Mtod*
dard did not hear the ear. as It
see him
1*1
b*
I
the fender struck Mr Stoddard
the htp throwing him sgalnnt kto »vs
tar with considerable force. Had bn
st* h~'n sn Inch or two farther buck
«rom bl» car he would bnvn bnen
fcrowt. beneath the passing enr and
to gerlou.ly If not fatally Injured
of ; k wss he escaped with bru (sen on bin
hip and side
abvutjr kl**a se ed
» -upant» of th« ear. but M waa aa
Idaho car and bore the number fly
*54 It ts surprising that
road display such absolut« disregard for
could driver of that ear
f The driver of the car did MS atop
-'' jto æe what If any. Injury Mr. Mtod
tard »u»t»in«ut but continued at a
Mr Stoddard did not
Smew th»- driver cor any of th« me

sp human life os was skews by th*

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